apt

Some tips for troubleshooting packages on your system or Ouch! the Pain!

When something is working, it seems to make sense to you. For example, we all know that a car burns gas, and uses the energy to run a motor that turns the wheels to make it go. Gas--> motor--> wheels--> Go! It seems simple. The same is true of an operating system. You turn it on, it boots up, some text goes across the screen, then the windows pop up and you're ready to go. Boot--> text--> windows--> Go! Its easy, until something breaks. You never really understand how complicated something is until it breaks.

Tales From the Front: in Search of APT-GET UNDO

I am currently in that level of hell reserved for people who upgrade their GNU/Linux system too quickly. I have for some time now been happily using KDE 4 with the plasma desktop enjoying the cute little animations and eye candy, and learning to use the task-bar and widgets. Then my bliss was interrupted by a simple mistake. I decided to upgrade. I forgot that my /etc/apt/sources.list was set to load experimental versions of the software, and now my X-server system is broken. It is only now that I am discovering that there is no apt-get undo.

Updating your system: GNU/Linux 5, Windows 0

The pace of software development -- regardless of the licence -- is pretty fast these days. The state of your systems need constant monitoring. New features, bug-fixes and (most important) security updates need to be properly managed. Here, in no particular order, are five ways that choosing a free operating system will make system maintenance a lot easier and simpler. In short they are ways that -- when it comes to system updates -- GNU/Linux beats Windows.

How to find .debs (even if you think they don't exist)

One of the biggest strengths of Debian (and derivatives like Ubuntu) is support for the .deb package. After all, it provides a one-click method of easily installing programs. Best of all, these programs are automatically updated via the official Debian repositories. Unfortunately, the official repositories aren’t always the best. Some programs aren’t always up to date (the latest version of Thunderbird is 2.0. However, the latest version in the repositories is 1.5).

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