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Updated: 3 hours 47 min ago

Ubuntu Server blog: 2014-04-08 Meeting Minutes

Tue, 2014-04-08 17:12

A few last pieces are being worked in the last couple of days to final
freeze.

  • James Page is struggling to find a release team member to review the docker.io feature freeze exception request (bug 1295093).
  • The juju-quickstart MIR is deferred; Robie will upload some final bugfixes soon.
  • Louis is working on some last minute fixes to sosreport.
  • Parameswaran reports that all smoke tests are passing.
  • Stefan is polishing some last pieces in Xen and libvirt.

Full minutes: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/MeetingLogs/Server/20140408
Log: http://ubottu.com/meetingology/logs/ubuntu-meeting/2014/ubuntu-meeting.2014-04-08-16.01.log.html

Ubuntu Kernel Team: Kernel Team Meeting Minutes – April 08, 2014

Tue, 2014-04-08 17:11
Meeting Minutes

IRC Log of the meeting.

Meeting minutes.

Agenda

20140408 Meeting Agenda


ARM Status

T/master-next: LP1303657 (“Cannot boot trusty kernel on qemu-system-arm”) – we
were missing the correct dtb (wasn’t necessary in S) and qemu was waiting for a
console over jtag (HVC_DCC) that would never show up – waiting for a
confirmation from the reporter before sending the patches.


Release Metrics and Incoming Bugs

Release metrics and incoming bug data can be reviewed at the following link:

http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/reports/kt-meeting.txt


Milestone Targeted Work Items    apw    core-1311-kernel    4 work items          core-1311-cross-compilation    2 work items          core-1311-hwe-plans    1 work item       ogasawara    core-1403-hwe-stack-eol-notifications    2 work items       smb    servercloud-1311-openstack-virt    3 work items   


Status: Trusty Development Kernel

We entered into Kernel Freeze for Trusty last Thurs and have uploaded
what we intend to be the final kernel for Trusty, 3.13.0-23.45. All
patches from here on out are subject to our Ubuntu SRU policy and only
critical bug fixes will warrant an upload before release next week.
—–
Important upcoming dates:
Thurs Apr 17 – Ubuntu 14.04 Final Release (~1 week away)


Status: CVE’s

The current CVE status can be reviewed at the following link:

http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/cve/pkg/ALL-linux.html


Status: Stable, Security, and Bugfix Kernel Updates – Saucy/Raring/Quantal/Precise/Lucid

Status for the main kernels, until today (Mar. 25):

  • Lucid – Verification and Testing
  • Precise – Verification and Testing
  • Quantal – Verification and Testing
  • Saucy – Verification and Testing

    Current opened tracking bugs details:

  • http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/reports/kernel-sru-workflow.html

    For SRUs, SRU report is a good source of information:

  • http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/reports/sru-report.html

    Schedule:

    cycle: 30-Mar through 26-Apr
    ====================================================================
    28-Mar Last day for kernel commits for this cycle
    30-Mar – 05-Apr Kernel prep week.
    06-Apr – 12-Apr Bug verification & Regression testing.
    17-Apr 14.04 Released
    13-Apr – 26-Apr Regression testing & Release to -updates.


Open Discussion or Questions? Raise your hand to be recognized

No open discussion.

Daniel Pocock: reConServer for easy SIP conferencing

Tue, 2014-04-08 16:24

In the lead up to the release of Debian wheezy, there was quite some debate about the Mumble conferencing software which uses the deprecated and unsupported CELT codec. Although Mumble has very recently added Opus support, it is still limited by the fact that it is a standalone solution without any support for distributed protocols like SIP or XMPP.

Making SIP conferencing easy

Of course, people could always set up SIP conferences by installing Asterisk but for many use cases that may be overkill and may simply introduce alternative security and administration overheads.

Enter reConServer

The popular reSIProcate SIP stack includes a high-level programming API, the Conversation Manager, dubbed librecon. It was developed and contributed to the open source project by Scott Godin of SIP Spectrum. In very simple terms, a Conversation object with two Participants is a phone call. A Conversation object with more than two Participants is a conference.

The original librecon includes a fully functional demo app, testUA that allows you to control conferences from the command line.

As part of Google Summer of Code 2013, Catalin Constantin Usurelu took the testUA.cxx code and converted it into a proper daemon process. It is now available as a ready-to-run SIP conferencing server package in Debian and Ubuntu.

The quick and easy way to try it

Normally, a SIP conferencing server will be linked to a SIP proxy and other infrastructure.

For trying it out quickly, however, no SIP proxy is necessary.

Simply install the package with the default settings and then configure a client to talk to the reConServer directly by dialing the IP address of the server.

For example, set the following options in /etc/reConServer/reConServer.config:

UDPPort = 5062 EnableAutoAnswer = true

and it will happily accept all SIP calls sent to the IP address where it is running.

Now configure Jitsi to talk to it directly in serverless SIP configuration:

Notice here that we simply put a username without any domain part, this tells Jitsi to create an account that can operate without a SIP proxy or registration server:

Calling in to the conference

Notice in the screenshot below we simply dial the IP address and port number of the reConServer process, sip:192.168.1.100:5062. When the first call comes in, reConServer will answer and place the caller on hold. When the next caller arrives, the hold should automatically finish and audio will be heard.

Next steps

To make it run as part of a proper SIP deployment, set the necessary configuration options (username, password, proxy) to make reConServer register to the SIP proxy. Users can then call the conference through the proxy.

To discuss any problems or questions, please come and join the recon-users mailing list or the Jitsi users list

Consider using Wireshark to observe the SIP packets and learn more about the protocol.

Laura Czajkowski: School is in session

Tue, 2014-04-08 14:59

I’ve had a lot of travel lately and I’ve had some time to think, when you take a step back and look at technology you realise it’s always changing always developing updating and adding new features.  It got me thinking, I should also keep updating my knowledge bank. It’s all well and good to talk about technology to people daily which I do but I also needed to understand more of it in greater depth.

Last week I started my first class M101P – MongoDB 101 Python, online course for 7 weeks and given my travel lately having something online is ideal for me. I’ve chosen python as I’ve wanted to learn python for a while now so killing two birds with one stone, there is also java which I did at college and never really loved! and node.js which I don’t have any experience but perhaps the next time I’ll try that course.

As I’m running Ubuntu (currently trusty) it’s simple to get started, either via the software centre or by following the instructions in the docs.

Install MongoDB via Ubuntu Software Centre

 

If you follow the tutorial which I’m currently doing it starts off with what is MongoDB? Some easy definitions but you do feel you are learning things as after each short video from Andrew ( the teacher) you have a short quiz. Makes the learning a bit more fun and also not as boring.

What is in store for M101P

 

After following through the sections it’s easy to plan out the 2 hours I need to do the class, and then 2 hours I need for homework, I’m not doing it for the cert which you can get, I just want to expand my knowledge. So many applications like Ubuntu use MongoDB, if you’re using JuJu you can use the MongoDB Charm.  I love the way our tools overlap with one another but that means I need to understand more. Hopefully this class will help me with this and it should be a fun few weeks taking part. It’s free online course which could be useful and it’s always good to learn about new open source projects out there,

Ubuntu App Developer Blog: Reminder: Ubuntu App Showdown – don’t be late

Tue, 2014-04-08 13:36

Here’s the final reminder. The App Showdown is almost over and you can win some beautiful devices if you get your app in tomorrow, Wednesday, April 9th 2014 (23:59 UTC).

Getting your app in is very easy: just follow these two steps.

Submit your app

This is obviously the most important bit and needs to happen first. Don’t leave this to the last minute. Your app might have to go through a couple of reviews before it’s accepted in the store. So plan in some time for that. Once it’s accepted and published in the store, you can always, much more quickly, publish an update.

Submit your app.

Register your participation

Once your app is in the store, you need to register your participation in the App Showdown. To make sure your application is registered for the contest and judges review it, you’ll need to fill in the participation form. You can start filling it in already and until the submission deadline, it should only take you 2 minutes to complete.

Fill out the submission form.

Questions?

If you have questions or need help, reach out (also rather sooner than later) to our great community of Ubuntu App Developers.

Good luck everyone, we’re looking forward to lots and lots of great apps!

Leo Iannacone: Fluxbox Light Themes

Tue, 2014-04-08 07:49

Fluxbox Light Themes is a porting of Ubuntu Themes for Fluxbox.

Install

You can choose to use this ppa or take directly the deb package.
Alternatively you can download the archive and install themes manually by copying Ambiance and Radiance into your local Fluxbox styles folder:

cp -r Ambiance ~/.fluxbox/styles cp -r Radiance ~/.fluxbox/styles Tips

Remember to update these settings in your ~/.fluxbox/init:

session.*.titlebar.left: Close Minimize Maximize session.*.titlebar.right: Preview

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