Hacking

Hacking

Installing an all-in-one printer device in Debian

Recently I had cause to buy a scanner. Being in a reasonably small home I was eager to save on desk-space, and so decided to upgrade my ageing inkjet printer at the same time. Having looked around I eventually went for an HP Photosmart C5180 device. This is my experience of installing it on Debian Lenny.

Indexing offline CD-ROM archives

Suppose you've been good (or sort of good anyway), and you have a huge stack of CD-ROMs (or DVDs) with backups and archives of your old files. Great. But how can you find anything? I solved this problem today by making an index of all the files stored on these disks using a few simple GNU command line tools.

Development in Open Source

Wed, 2008-04-23 15:58 -- liran

Open Source projects have gained in the past few years an entirely different reputation in the public's eye, in a good sense.

Now-days we are seeing things happening in the Open Source arena, beautiful things, that most of us didn't expect to take place so fast and so intense. Among these, are the huge amount of endorsement in terms of project sponsorship coming from Fortune 500 companies as well as funds that keep pouring on either existing Open Source projects to support them or even

My OpenDiameter Experience, Part II, setting up a simple 3-party EAP-MD5 test

In Part I, I have shown what I did to get the build and installation going. In Part II, I will show what steps I took to get a simplest test like the following done: A EAP-MD5 test that involves an OpenDiameter server (aaad), an OpenDiameter client (nasd), and a EAP-MD5 client (pacd) talking to nasd using PANA. All three parties reside on one single host.

Simple as the test is, a lot of work is needed in OpenDiameter's case, as we will see soon.

Some Background Information

The Diameter Protocol

Destroy annoying bugs part 4: the end is near

In this the last part of this four-part series I will zoom carefully into the ease of use of PMD. I totally enjoy PMD. The reason for this is the relative simplicity of writing your own bug pattern-capturing rules and using them under fire. More on that later. To round off we have included an in-depth interview with Tom Copeland, the author of PMD Applied and the newer JavaCC . It is no coincidence that Tom is at the center of the PMD development thrust.

Note: this is Part 4. Feel free to read Part 3!

Destroy annoying bugs part 3: FindBugs for large scale analysis

In the previous posts, I have written about personal use of static code reviews via a GUI, in this case Eclipse. However, for large projects with hundreds of thousands of lines of code or more, with the code base being scattered amongst project teams, we have a problem. The economics of Quality Assurance demand a more mass analyzed and factory-efficient approach. Do things quick, hit the code, find the worst bugs and repair. The white box looking out, in combination with the functional or load testing black box methodologies looking in.

Note: this is Part 3. Feel free to read Part 2!

Destroy annoying bugs part 2: Plug me into Eclipse.

Static code reviews aimed at eating bugs (!) are unbiased and neutral. If you spill coffee on their laps or are applying for the same job as them, the advice given back will remain the same. Static code reviews work via rules; some rules are accurate in their assessment and others are not so relevant--or even false. Before building a thorough infrastructure for large-scale deployment, it is well worth installing the tool's respective plugins. You can have a lot of fun kicking the tires of the rule sets for your own particular environment. Getting your fingers into the reality of the code is the first step in the path to Quality Assurance enlightenment. Note to self, remember to ask boss for pay rise.

Note: this is Part 2. Feel free to read Part 1!

Destroy annoying bugs part 1: FindBugs and PMD doing good work cheaply

Finding bugs in your code can be quite nasty--especially if you don't know where to look. However, finding bugs automatically does not require astronaut training. I think it's time to leave that "pleasure" to free (as in freedom) automatic static code review tools like the ones reviewed in this series of articles.

My OpenDiameter Experience, Part I, Build and Installation

Diameter is a AAA protocol that is supposed to be the successor to RADIUS, and OpenDiameter is an open source implementation of the Diameter Protocol. I recently started playing around with OpenDiameter and, to my surprise, the online resources and documentations on how to use it are very hard to find, if there is any. I figured out my way to get the basics running, and I am here to share my initial experiences, hoping to help other OpenDiameter beginners. I also hope that the OpenDiameter community could contribute more

HOWTO: Incremental Setup of FreeRADIUS Server for EAP Authentications

Introduction

If you are like me and need to set up a FreeRADIUS server for EAP authentications every so often, each time do you also find yourself having a little hard time trying to refresh your memory? Well, after that happened to me for a couple of times, I found that a incremental and systematic way of setting up and testing FreeRADIUS server could make it easier to remember and easier to debug. Here is what I do and I hope it can benefit others as well.

Step 1. Set up and test local authentication without EAP, using radtest tool.

Configure a professional firewall using pfSense

The guide will take you through the setup of the pfSense firewall with one WAN interface, one LAN interface and one Opt1-WiFi Interface.

This guide was written for Linksys, Netgear, and D-link users with no firewall or router experience. No experience is needed with FreeBSD or GNU/Linux to install and run pfSense. When you are finished, management of pfSense will be from a web interface just like any of the SOHO firewall/router appliances.

Red Hat packagers dance around frivolous music game software patents

Sadly, there's nothing genuinely new about this story, but a recent discussion on the Fedora Games mailing list demonstrates the sort of chilling effect on innovation and impoverishment of the intellectual commons that occurs today because of a broken, outmoded US patent system and its misapplication to software. I'm at a loss for words to express how absurd these "patents" are.

NetBeans 6.0 is out: why should developers use it?

The free software age is all about giving the freedom to choose: flexibility to choose the best out of a variety of almost-the-best software is one of the hallmarks of this era. On the flip side, a newbie to this world often faces a choice overload. Should she go for Fedora or Ubuntu or Debian, GNOME or KDE, NetBeans or Eclipse, Open MPI or Open MP or PVM? We have loyalists on every side swearing by their product--and they are not wrong. It is tough to make a choice. However, with time, based on usage preferences, a choice is made and she finds her favourite distro, development tools and the like.

At the moment, two IDEs are dominant in the free software world: Eclipse and NetBeans. Being a NetBeans fan (and part of the NetBeans community), I will explain why in my opinion it's NetBeans is a fantastic choice.

Review of FreeBSD 7

The next major update of FreeBSD 7, due this December, is in the running to be one of the most impressive FreeBSD releases to date. The ULE scheduler has now reached maturity, leading to significant gains across the board (particularly in server workloads). This new scheduler brings notably impressive performance improvements to both MySQL and PostgreSQL.

In the first section of this article, I'm going to take a look at what's new. In the second section, I will discuss what the future holds for FreeBSD beyond the upcoming FreeBSD 7.0 release, including screen shots of the revamped FreeBSD installer "finstall".

Configure Exim with anti-spam

A few comments on my article The perfect network server in issue 17 requested some more in depth follow-up pieces. This is what I hope to be the first of those. It focuses on Exim, the mail transfer agent (MTA), specifically setting it up with spam scanning. It is based on setups I currently use, hosted on Debian GNU/Linux.

Home automation in GNU/Linux

Home Automation is anything that your home does for you automatically to make living there more enjoyable or productive. It covers many areas, including remote and timed control of lights and electrical home appliances, distributed media services, and communication. Over the last 10 years, many hardware manufacturers have presented their own proprietary solutions to these problems. Unbeknownst to them, a groundswell of developers from around the world has been providing similar solutions to the free and open source community.

All the C you need to know for GTK+

If you want to develop applications with GTK+, a graphical toolkit used by the GNOME desktop environment, it is essential that you are comfortable with the C programming language. This article is meant to give you a short refresher on the basics of C that you will need to know when developing GTK+ applications.

Writing a kernel module for FreeBSD

FreeBSD 7.0 has already been released. If you are a real hacker, the best way to jump in and learn it is hacking together an introductory kernel module. In this article I'll implement a very basic module that prints a message when it is loaded, and another when it is unloaded. I'll also cover the mechanics of compiling our module using standard tools and rebuilding the stock FreeBSD kernel. Let's do it!

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