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The Fridge: Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn) alpha-2 released!

Planet Ubuntu - Fri, 2014-08-01 17:57

– The Unicorn looked dreamily at Alice, and said "Talk, child."
– Alice could not help her lips curling up into a smile as she began: "Do
you know, I always thought Unicorns were fabulous monsters, too? I
never saw one alive before!"
– "Well, now that we have seen each other," said the Unicorn, "If you’ll
believe in me, I’ll believe in you. Is that a bargain?"

Lewis Carroll, Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There.

The second alpha of the Utopic Unicorn (to become 14.10) has now been released!

This alpha features images for Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu GNOME, UbuntuKylin and the Ubuntu Cloud images.

Pre-releases of the Utopic Unicorn are *not* encouraged for anyone needing a stable system or anyone who is not comfortable running into occasional, even frequent breakage. They are, however, recommended for Ubuntu flavor developers and those who want to help in testing, reporting and fixing bugs as we work towards getting this release ready.

Alpha 2 includes a number of software updates that are ready for wider testing. This is quite an early set of images, so you should expect some bugs.

While these Alpha 2 images have been tested and work, except as noted in the release notes, Ubuntu developers are continuing to improve the Utopic Unicorn. In particular, once newer daily images are available, system installation bugs identified in the Alpha 2 installer should be verified against the current daily image before being reported in Launchpad. Using an obsolete image to re-report bugs that have already been fixed wastes your time and the time of developers who are busy trying to make 14.10 the best Ubuntu release yet. Always ensure your system is up to date before reporting bugs.

Kubuntu

Kubuntu is the KDE based flavour of Ubuntu. It uses the Plasma desktop and includes a wide selection of tools from the KDE project.

Kubuntu development is now focussing on the next generation of KDE Software, Plasma 5. This is not yet stable enough for everyday use, so we are still shipping the Plasma 1 desktop on our image which has been updated to the latest version in the alpha.

The Alpha-2 images can be downloaded at: http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/kubuntu/releases/utopic/alpha-2/

More information on Kubuntu Alpha-2 can be found here: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/UtopicUnicorn/Alpha2/Kubuntu

Lubuntu

Lubuntu is a flavor of Ubuntu based on LXDE and focused on providing a very lightweight distribution.

The Alpha 2 images can be downloaded at: http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/lubuntu/releases/utopic/alpha-2/

Ubuntu GNOME

Ubuntu GNOME is a flavor of Ubuntu featuring the GNOME desktop environment.

The Alpha-2 images can be downloaded at: http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/ubuntu-gnome/releases/utopic/alpha-2/

More information on Ubuntu GNOME Alpha-2 can be found here: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/UtopicUnicorn/Alpha2/UbuntuGNOME

UbuntuKylin

UbuntuKylin is a flavor of Ubuntu that is more suitable for Chinese users.

The Alpha-2 images can be downloaded at: http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/ubuntukylin/releases/utopic/alpha-2/

More information on UbuntuKylin Alpha-2 can be found here: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Ubuntu%20Kylin/1410-alpha-2-ReleaseNote

Ubuntu Cloud

Ubuntu Cloud images will shortly be available. These images can be run on Amazon EC2, Openstack, SmartOS and many other clouds.

http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/releases/utopic/alpha-2/

Regular daily images for Ubuntu can be found at: http://cdimage.ubuntu.com

If you’re interested in following the changes as we further develop Utopic, we suggest that you subscribe to the ubuntu-devel-announce list. This is a low-traffic list (a few posts a week) carrying announcements of approved specifications, policy changes, alpha releases and other interesting events.

http://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-devel-announce

A big thank you to the developers and testers for their efforts to pull together this Alpha release!

From the steps outside GUADEC in Strasbourg, and on behalf of the Ubuntu release team,

Originally posted to the ubuntu-devel-announce mailing list on Fri Aug 1 08:50:23 UTC 2014 by Iain Lane

Harald Sitter: Porting to KDE Frameworks 5

Planet Ubuntu - Fri, 2014-08-01 12:44

Porting to KDE Frameworks 5 is so easy even I can do it.

Almost all Kubuntu software is ported already. Some of the applications even managed to go qt-only because of all the awesome bits that moved from kdelibs into Qt5. It is all really very awesome I have to say.

Harald Sitter: Kubuntu Testing and You

Planet Ubuntu - Fri, 2014-08-01 12:44

With the latest Kubuntu 14.04 Beta 1 out the door, the Kubuntu team is hard at work to deliver the highest possible quality for the upcoming LTS release.

As part of this we are introducing basic test cases that every user can run to ensure that core functionality such as instant messaging and playing MP3 files is working as expected. All tests are meant to take no more than 10 minutes and should be doable by just about everyone. They are the perfect way to get some basic testing done without all the hassle testing usually involves.

If you are already testing Beta 1, head on over to our Quality Assurance Headquarters to get the latest test cases.

Feel free to run any test case, at any time.

If you have any questions, drop me a mail at apachelogger@kubuntu.org, or stop by in #kubuntu-devel on irc.freenode.net.

kitten by David Flores

Ubuntu GNOME: Ubuntu GNOME 14.04.1 LTS

Planet Ubuntu - Fri, 2014-08-01 12:41

Hi,

Ubuntu GNOME Team is happy to announce the first point release for Ubuntu GNOME 14.04 LTS.

  • Q: What are point releases for LTS versions of Ubuntu family?
  • A: Please, see the answer.

Get Ubuntu GNOME 14.04.1

  1. First of all, kindly do read the release notes.
  2. Download from here.

To contact Ubuntu GNOME:
Please see our full list of contact channels.

Thank you for choosing and using Ubuntu GNOME!

 

Ubuntu GNOME: Utopic Unicorn Alpha2

Planet Ubuntu - Fri, 2014-08-01 12:02

Hi,

Ubuntu GNOME Team is pleased to announce the release of Ubuntu GNOME Utopic Unicorn Alpha 2.

Please do read the release notes.

NOTE:

This is Alpha 2 Release. Ubuntu GNOME Alpha Releases are NOT recommended for:

  • Regular users who are not aware of pre-release issues
  • Anyone who needs a stable system
  • Anyone uncomfortable running a possibly frequently broken system
  • Anyone in a production environment with data or workflows that need to be reliable

Ubuntu GNOME Alpha Releases are recommended for:

  • Regular users who want to help us test by finding, reporting, and/or fixing bugs
  • Ubuntu GNOME developers

To help with testing Ubuntu GNOME:
Please see Testing Ubuntu GNOME Wiki Page.

To contact Ubuntu GNOME:
Please see our full list of contact channels.

Thank you for choosing and testing Ubuntu GNOME!

Kubuntu: Utopic Alpha 2 Released

Planet Ubuntu - Fri, 2014-08-01 09:21
Alpha 2 of Utopic is out now for testing. Download it or upgrade to it to test what will become 14.10 in October.

Adam Stokes: Ubuntu Openstack Installer – upcoming ui enhancements

Planet Ubuntu - Fri, 2014-08-01 06:34

In our next release of the Openstack Installer we concentrated on some visual improvements. Here are a few screenshots of some of those changes:

We’ve enhanced feedback of what’s happening during the installation phase:

Services are now being displayed as deployment occurs rather than waiting until completion:

An added help screen to provide more insight into the installer:

We decided to keep it more Openstack focused when listing the running services, this is the final view with all components deployed:

And if you don’t care about the UI (why wouldn’t you?!?) there is an added option to run the entire deployment in your console:

We’ve still got some more polishing to do and a few more enhancements to add, so keep your eye out for a future announcement!

If you are interested in helping us out head over to the installer github page and have a look, the experimental branch is the code used when generating these screenshots. Some of our immediate needs are end to end testing of the single and multi installer, extending the guides, and feedback on the UI itself.

Adnane Belmadiaf: Ubuntu Touch session in Morocco

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 2014-07-31 22:05

Next November I'll be speaking at JMaghreb conference, i'll be giving a talk about the Ubuntu Touch platform and the Ubuntu development story, together with a live coding session and a Q&A round at the end.

In this session i'll be covering :

  • System architecture
  • Security model
  • QML/HTML5 SDK
  • Platform APIs(udm, push notifications, webview, etc...)
  • Writing & testing apps on the device & the emulator
  • Publishing apps to the store

The exact time & date of the session will be announced soon, so if you're going to be in or near Morocco this November, make sure to attend!

Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S07E18 – The One with the Flashback

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 2014-07-31 18:30

We’re back with Season Seven, Episode Eighteen of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope is sill MIA, Mark Johnson is still in quarantine but talking to us using Skype, and Tony Whitmore and Laura Cowen are drinking cold squash (it’s really quite hot out there!) and eating Jamaican Ginger cake in Studio L.

 Download OGG  Download MP3 Play in Popup

In this week’s show:

We’ll be back next week, so please send your comments and suggestions to: podcast@ubuntu-uk.org
Join us on IRC in #uupc on Freenode
Leave a voicemail via phone: +44 (0) 203 298 1600, sip: podcast@sip.ubuntu-uk.org and skype: ubuntuukpodcast
Follow us on Twitter
Find our Facebook Fan Page
Follow us on Google+

Elizabeth K. Joseph: A Career in FOSS at Fosscon in Philadelphia, August 9th

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 2014-07-31 17:05

After years fueled by hobbyist passion, I’ve been really excited to see how work that many of my peers and I have been doing in open source has grown into us having serious technical careers these past few years. Whether you’re a programmer, community manager, systems administrator like me or other type of technologist, familiarity with Open Source technology, culture and projects can be a serious boon to your career.

Last year when I attended Fosscon in Philadelphia, I did a talk about my work as an “Open Source Sysadmin” – meaning all my work for the OpenStack Infrastructure team is done in public code repositories. Following my talk I got a lot of questions about how I’m funded to do this, and a lot of interest in the fact that a company like HP is making such an investment.

So this year I’m returning to Fosscon to talk about these things! In addition to my own experiences with volunteer and paid work in Open Source, I’ll be drawing experience from my colleague at HP, Mark Atwood, who recently wrote 7 skills to land your open source dream job and those of others folks I work with who are also “living the dream” with a job in open source.

I’m delighted to be joined at this conference by keynote speaker and friend Corey Quinn and Charlie Reisinger of Penn Manor School District who I’ve chatted with via email and social media many times about the amazing Ubuntu deployment at his district and whom am looking forward to finally meeting.

In Philadelphia or near by? The conference is coming up on Saturday, August 9th and is being held at the the world-renowned Franklin Institute science museum.

Registration to the conference is free, but you get a t-shirt if you pay the small stipend of $25 to support the conference (I did!): http://fosscon.us/Attend

Ubuntu Scientists: Backport spyder 2.3 to Ubuntu 14.04 LTS

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 2014-07-31 15:26

News from Ghislain Vaillant:

The recently released Spyder version 2.3 introduced the much awaited Python 3 support. Debian already has a working package in testing/unstable for both Python 2 (spyder) and Python 3 (spyder3). I have proposed a backport of this version of Spyder to the current LTS in the following bug report: https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/spyder/+bug/1347487 For those who are interested, please back this proposal up by adding any additional comments up in the bug report or simply marking yourself as affected.


Filed under: News Tagged: spyder

Dustin Kirkland: Ubuntu OpenStack on an Orange Box, Live Demo at the Cloud Austin Meetup, August 19th

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 2014-07-31 10:49


I hope you'll join me at Rackspace on Tuesday, August 19, 2014, at the Cloud Austin Meetup, at 6pm, where I'll use our spectacular Orange Box to deploy Hadoop, scale it up, run a terasort, destroy it, deploy OpenStack, launch instances, and destroy it too.  I'll talk about the hardware (the Orange Box, Intel NUCs, Managed VLAN switch), as well as the software (Ubuntu, OpenStack, MAAS, Juju, Hadoop) that makes all of this work in 30 minutes or less!

Be sure to RSVP, as space is limited.

http://www.meetup.com/CloudAustin/events/194009002/
Cheers,
Dustin

Martin Albisetti: Engineering management

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 2014-07-31 02:02

I'm a few days away from hitting 6 years at Canonical and I've ended up doing a lot more management than anything else in that time. Before that I did a solid 8 years at my own company, doing anything from developing, project managing, product managing, engineering managing, sales and accounting.
This time of the year is performance review time at Canonical, so it's gotten me thinking a lot about my role and how my view on engineering management has evolved over the years.

A key insights I've had from a former boss, Elliot Murphy, was viewing it as a support role for others to do their job rather than a follow-the-leader approach. I had heard the phrase "As a manager, I work for you" a few times over the years, but it rarely seemed true and felt mostly like a good concept to make people happy but not really applied in practice in any meaningful way.

Of all the approaches I've taken or seen, a role where you're there to unblock developers more than anything else, I believe is the best one. And unless you're a bit power-hungry on some level, it's probably the most enjoyable way of being a manager.

It's not to be applied blindly, though, I think a few conditions have to be met:
1) The team has to be fairly experienced/senior/smart, I think if it isn't it breaks down to often
2) You need to understand very clearly what needs doing and why, and need to invest heavily and frequently in communicated it to the team, both the global context as well as how it applies to them individually
3) You need to build a relationship of trust with each person and need to trust them, because trust is always a 2-way street
4) You need to be enough of an engineer to understand problems in depth when explained, know when to defer to other's judgments (which should be the common case when the team generally smart and experienced) and be capable of tie-breaking in a technical-savvy way
5) Have anyone who's ego doesn't fit in a small, 100ml container, leave it at home

There are many more things to do, but I think if you don't have those five, everything else is hard to hold together. In general, if the team is smart and experienced, understands what needs doing and why, and like their job, almost everything else self-organizes.
If it isn't self-organizing well enough, walk over those 5 points, one or several must be mis-aligned. More often than not, it's 2). Communication is hard, expensive and more of an art than a science. Most of the times things have seemed to stumble a bit, it's been a failure of how I understood what we should be doing as a team, or a failure on how I communicated it to everyone else as it evolved over time.
Second most frequent I think is 1), but that may vary more depending on your team, company and project.

Oh, and actually caring about people and what you do helps a lot, but that helps a lot in life in general, so do that anyway regardless of you role 

TurnKey Linux: No Juju for you! Ubuntu's Not Invented Here syndrome

Planet Ubuntu - Wed, 2014-07-30 21:49

Today Brian emailed me to share his enthusiasm for the Ubuntu Juju project, developed by Canonical, the company that makes Ubuntu.

Brian is a good friend that has been advising us on all matters TurnKey practically since the project began. His advice and feedback is always well informed and insightful so even when I already have my own opinions on the matter, I still take the time to look into his suggestions carefully. Thanks Brian!

This time, Brian wrote in to share that he's been enjoying his (impressive) Juju experience and sent a few links for us to look at. He also asked:

Have you guys ever thought of creating Juju Charm's for all of the TurnKeyLinux apps?

The first thing I looked at was whether I could use Juju without using Ubuntu. Not really, and that's a major dealbreaker because TurnKey is based on Debian. It used to be based on Ubuntu but a few years after we started TurnKey it became increasingly clear that we made the wrong decision. Debian was superior on so many levels: community, security, stability, packaging quality and most importantly - the fundamental driving values. So we bit the bullet and moved over to Debian in 2012.

I figured a somewhat expanded version of my answer to Brian could start an interesting discussion so I'm posting it to the blog. In a nutshell, I'm trying to explain why I think many in the free software community are not terribly enthusiastic about building on top of Canonical's work and why Ubuntu seems to have lost so much ground as the world's favorite Linux distro.

In 2008, when Alon and I started TurnKey, Ubuntu was at its height. Here are the Google Trends for Ubuntu since:

Ouch. What happened? My response to Brian tells a small part of this story.

Brian, thanks for prompting me to take another look at Juju today. We are evaluating several directions for TurnKey 14, which we will be re-engineering to work as a collection of modular services built on top of Core rather than monolithic system images. We're going to try and avoid reinventing the wheel as much as possible by leveraging the best components.

Juju is an option but to be honest it's probably not the leading horse in the race, and sadly that has more to do with the track record of the company backing it then any technical fault. In the context of the free software community, getting the answers right at the technical level is almost never enough. Collaborating successfully with the broader ecosystem and winning over hearts and minds matters. A lot.

At this point, Juju doesn't seem to support Debian at all. Debian have even removed the Juju client from sid for some reason. Not sure what the story behind that is. Given the growing divergence between Ubuntu and Debian, we can't expect to be able to leverage the Juju Ubuntu charms without some serious forking.

More importantly, we don't want to back the wrong horse. Canonical have a bad case of not-invented-here syndrome and a tendency to not really listen to the community. They're like the Apple of the FLOSS world except that Shuttleworth is no Steve Jobs and I mean that both in a good way (not as much of an asshole) and a bad way (not as good a leader/visionary).

Brian responded by defending Canonical and explaining that from his perspective working with the world's largest service providers Canonical was making impressive in-roads, especially in the enterprise and cloud arena.

Brian is the expert here so I'm in no position to argue, and to be honest rereading the email I sent him it did come off as a bit more anti-Canonical / Ubuntu than I intended. But my main point wasn't that Canonical is a bad company or that Ubuntu sucks, just that what happens in Ubuntu stays in Ubuntu. Maybe that's great for Canonical in the Enterprise space, but it makes building on their work a shaky proposition.

Canonical: boldly going where no one wants to go after

Canonical has a special talent for either backing the wrong horse, or breeding it.  A few examples of Canonical's track record:

  • UEC vs OpenStack
  • Bazaar vs Git
  • Upstart vs systemd
  • Launchpad vs github
  • Unity vs gnome
  • mir vs wayland

Given this track record, a Canonical backed project is an unlikely winner in any race for widespread adoption. You'd think they would win some battles just by chance. What's going on? 

My pet theory is that it has to be a mix of reasons: They don't listen. They don't inspire. They don't make the best stuff. They don't have the best people. They don't have the most money or the best business.

They do good work, and provide nice solutions, but for some reason we never seem to see those solutions adopted outside of Ubuntu by the wider Linux community. If you aren't already in the Ubuntu camp it seems short-sighted to back their projects. 

I don't think that Canonical is bad at what it does. It's just that they're rarely the best and being mediocre (or even second best) isn't good enough when the tournament effect is at work. The winner takes home the pot (e.g., becomes the new standard) and Canonical isn't winning.

I'm not even sure they want to. I mean, does Apple want Firewire to become a standard? But Apple can afford to create its own standards. Can Canonical?

If companies were text editors, Canonical would be Emacs

Canonical is not a company driven by the Unix philosophy of doing one thing and doing it well. If companies were text editors, Canonical would be Emacs.

It's easy to lose count of the many different  directions they seem to be trying to go in at once: Ubuntu Desktop, Ubuntu Server, Ubuntu Cloud, Ubuntu Phone, Ubuntu Tablet, and Ubuntu TV. Oh my! I'm waiting for them to announce the Ubuntu gaming system and Ubuntu car. 

I'm impressed (and slightly fearful) by the way companies like Google have expanded their business, but Google waited until they were wildly profitable with their core product to do that. I'm no expert but having your fingers in so many pies when your company is still losing money a decade after its creation doesn't seem like sound business strategy.

And then there are the various community antagonizing fiascos that left me wondering how they didn't see it coming:

  • Sending Unity search results to Canonical (they've since fixed that)
  • Inserting Amazon product referrals into the desktop experience (they've since made it opt-in)

Sure they've since come to their senses, but as the old saying goes: an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

How much does Canonical really care about free software values?

Here's another thing that bugs me. It's unclear how much Shuttleworth/Canonical genuinely cares about the underlying values of free software. From the outside it looks like Canonical is firmly rooted in the "commercial open source" camp as opposed to the "free software" camp (what's the difference?). This is reflected in a tendency towards technical isolation and the design of solutions that encourage dependence on Canonical services.

The focus is on utility and convenience, not values. And to clarify what I mean by that - a value is a principle you would hold onto even if you get penalized for it by the marketplace. If you give lip service to a value but are willing to give it up to make more money that's not a value - that's marketing.

I'm not saying Canonical's focus on convenience and utility are bad. It's just not inspiring. And you need to be inspiring to lead.

Still, they do a lot of good work and have done much to popularize free software. We should congratulate them for that and be thankful that Shuttleworth decided to invest his millions to create the company. There's definitely a useful place for a company like Canonical in the ecosystem. Ubuntu provides a gentler introduction to the sometimes harsh world of free software. It's especially useful to the vast majority of "human beings" who aren't aware that free software has anything else to offer beyond the magic of getting stuff for free. Who knows, some of them may eventually pull back the curtain.

But it takes more then being useful to lead and Canonical's take on free software is just not very inspiring for developers and would-be contributors, many of whom, like myself, do care deeply about values. There's what you do, and there's why you do it.

Free software is more than a better way to develop software, and more than a way to get stuff for free. Free software is about freedom. The more technologically dependent our society becomes, the more free software values matter because technology is a double edged sword. It can be used to strengthen our freedoms, or take them away.

We need utility as a measuring stick, and the right values as our compass. We need both.

Which reminds me of a pearl of wisdom I came across that keeps reverberating in my head:

Develop people, not products.

Ubuntu App Developer Blog: A faster Ubuntu positioning system with Nokia HERE

Planet Ubuntu - Wed, 2014-07-30 09:09

We’re very excited to announce an agreement with Nokia HERE to provide A-GPS support on Ubuntu. The new platform service will enable developers to obtain accurate positioning data for their location-based apps in under two minutes, a significantly shorter Time To First Fix (TTFF) than the average for raw GPS technologies.

Faster positioning

While Ubuntu already features GPS-based location, it has always been a key requirement for the OS to provide application developers with rapid and efficient location positioning capabilities.

The new positioning service will be a hybrid solution integrating A-GPS and WiFi positioning, a powerful combo to help obtaining a very fast and accurate TTFF. The system is to be functional by the Release To Manufacturer (RTM) milestone, and available on the regular Ubuntu builds and for retail phones shipping Ubuntu.

Privacy and security

With the user’s explicit consent, anonymous data related to signal strength of local WiFi signals and radio cells can be contributed to crowd-sourcing location services, with the purpose of improving the overall quality of the positioning service for all users.

In line with Ubuntu’s privacy policy, no personal data of any nature is to be collected and released. Users will also be able to opt-out of this service if they do not wish their mobile handset to collect this type of data.

The positioning system will also be run under strict confinement, so that the service and its data cannot be accessed without the user explicitly granting access. With Ubuntu’s trust model, a confined application has to be granted trust by the user to gain access to security- or privacy-relevant system components.

Mapping capabilities

As the new service is to be focused on positioning, it will be decoupled from any mapping solution. Ubuntu Developers, as before, will have a choice of mapping services to use for their applications, including Nokia HERE, OpenStreetMap and others.

Header image based on “openstreetmap gps coverage” by Steven Kay, CC-BY-SA 2.0.

Duncan McGreggor: OSCON 2014 Theme Song - Andrew Sorensen's Live Coding Keynote

Planet Ubuntu - Wed, 2014-07-30 06:14
Andrew Sorensen live-coding at OSCON 2014Keynote

Shortly after Andrew Sorensen began the performance segment of his keynote at OSCON 2014, the #oscon Twitter topic began erupting with posts about the live coding session. Comments, retweets, and additional links persisted for that day and the next. In short, Andrew was a hit :-)

My first encounter with Andrew's work was a few years ago when I was getting back into Lisp. I was playing with generative music with Overtone (and then, a bit later, experimenting with SuperCollider, Hy, and Twisted) and came across his piece A Study in Keith. You might want to take a break from reading this port and watch that now ...

When Andrew started up his presentation, I didn't immediately recognize him. In fact, when the code was displayed on the big screens, I assumed it was Clojure until I looked closely and saw he was using (define ...) and not (defun ...).  This seemed very familiar, and then I remembered Impromptu, which ultimately lead to my discovery of Extempore (see more links below) and the realization that this is what Andrew was using to live code.

At the end of the performance a bunch of us jumped up and gave a standing ovation. (In fact, you can hear me yell out "YEAH" at the end of his presentation when he says "And there we go."). It was quite a show. It seemed the OSCON 2014 had been given a theme song. The next step was getting the source code ...


Andrew's gist (Dark Github Theme)Sharing the Code

Andrew gave a presentation on Extempore in the ballroom right after the keynote. This too was fantastic and resulted in much tweeting.

Afterwards a bunch of us went up front and chatted with him, enthusing about his work, the recent presentation, the keynote, and his previously published pieces.

I had Andrew's ear for a moment, and asked him if he was interested in sharing his keynote source -- there had been several requests for it on Twitter (that also got retweeted and/or favourited). Without hesitation, he gave an enthusiastic "yes" and we were off and running for the lounge where we could sit down to create a gist (and grab a cappuccino!). The availability of the source was announced immediately, to the delight of many.


Setting Up Extempore

Sublime Text 3 connected to ExtemporeLater that night in my hotel room, I had time to download and run Extempore ... and discovered that I couldn't actually play the keynote code, since there was some implicit setup I was missing. However, after some digging around on the docs site and the mail list, music was pouring forth from my laptop -- to my great joy :-D

To ensure anyone else who is not familiar with Extempore can also have this pleasure, I've put together the all the prerequisites and setup necessary in a forked gist, in multiple parts. I will go through those in this blog post. Also: all of my testing and live coding was done using Ben Swift's Extempore Sublime Text plugin.

The first step is getting all the dependencies. You'll want to start the downloads right away, since they are large (the sample files are compressed .wavs). While that's going on, you can install Extempore using Homebrew (this worked for me on Mac OS X with no additional tweaking/configuration necessary):

With Extempore running, let's do some setup. We're going to need to:

  • load some libraries (this takes a while for them to compile),
  • define some samples, and then
  • define some musical note aliases for convenience (and visual clarity).
The easiest way to use the files below is to clone the gist repo and load them up in Sublime Text, executing blocks of text by hi-lighting them, and then pressing ^x^x.
Here is the file for the fist two bullets mentioned above:

You will need to edit this file to point to the locations where your samples were downloaded. Also,at the very end there are some lines of code you can execute to make sure that your samples are working.
Now let's define the note aliases. You can just hi-light the entire contents of this file in Sublime Text and then ^x^x:
At this point, we're ready to play!


Playing the Music

To get started on the music, open up the fourth file from the clone of the gist and ^x^x the root, scale, and left-hand-notes-* constants.

Here is the evolution of the left hand part:
Go ahead and start that first one playing (^x^x the definition as well as the call). Wait for a bit, and then execute the next one, etc. Once you've started playing the final left hand form, you can switch to the wider range of notes defined/updated at the bottom.

Next, you'll want to bring in the right hand ... then bassline ... then the higher fmsynth sparkles for the right hand:

Then you'll increase the energy with the drum section:

Finally, you'll bring it to the climax, and then start the gentle fade out:

A slightly modified code listing for the final keynote form is here:


Variation on a Theme

I have recorded a variation of Andrew's keynote based on the code above, for your listening pleasure :-) You can listen to it in your browser or download it.

This version plays part of the left hand piano an octave lower. There's a tiny bit of clipping in places, and I accidentally jazzed it up (and for too long!) with a hi-hat change in the middle. There are also some awkward transitions and volume oddities. However, these should be inspiration for you to make your own variation of the OSCON 2014 Theme Song :-)

The "script" used for the recording can found here.


Links of Note

Some of these were mentioned above, some haven't been. All relate to Extempore :-)


Daniel Pocock: Pruning Syslog entries from MongoDB

Planet Ubuntu - Tue, 2014-07-29 18:27

I previously announced the availability of rsyslog+MongoDB+LogAnalyzer in Debian wheezy-backports. This latest rsyslog with MongoDB storage support is also available for Ubuntu and Fedora users in one way or another.

Just one thing was missing: a flexible way to prune the database. LogAnalyzer provides a very basic pruning script that simply purges all records over a certain age. The script hasn't been adapted to work within the package layout. It is written in PHP, which may not be ideal for people who don't actually want LogAnalyzer on their Syslog/MongoDB host.

Now there is a convenient solution: I've just contributed a very trivial Python script for selectively pruning the records.

Thanks to Python syntax and the PyMongo client, it is extremely concise: in fact, here is the full script:

#!/usr/bin/python import syslog import datetime from pymongo import Connection # It assumes we use the default database name 'logs' and collection 'syslog' # in the rsyslog configuration. with Connection() as client: db = client.logs table = db.syslog #print "Initial count: %d" % table.count() today = datetime.datetime.today() # remove ANY record older than 5 weeks except mail.info t = today - datetime.timedelta(weeks=5) table.remove({"time":{ "$lt": t }, "syslog_fac": { "$ne" : syslog.LOG_MAIL }}) # remove any debug record older than 7 days t = today - datetime.timedelta(days=7) table.remove({"time":{ "$lt": t }, "syslog_sever": syslog.LOG_DEBUG}) #print "Final count: %d" % table.count()

Just put it in /usr/local/bin and run it daily from cron.

Customization

Just adapt the table.remove statements as required. See the PyMongo tutorial for a very basic introduction to the query syntax and full details in the MongoDB query operator reference for creating more elaborate pruning rules.

Potential improvements
  • Indexing the columns used in the queries
  • Logging progress and stats to Syslog


LogAnalyzer using a database backend such as MongoDB is very easy to set up and much faster than working with text-based log files

Ubuntu Server blog: Server team meeting minutes: 2014-07-29

Planet Ubuntu - Tue, 2014-07-29 17:46
Meeting Actions

None

U Development

The discussion about “U Development” started at 16:00.

  • Feature freeze is August 21. Note Debian Import Freeze is coming up
    • as well.
  • The mysql /var/lib/mysql discussion is proceeding, but it seems
    • unlikely that this will happen by feature freeze now. Nevertheless, we expect to land 5.6 in main in the same manner as 5.5 is currently on schedule.
  • http://status.ubuntu.com/ubuntu-u/group/topic-u-server.html – please

    • remember to keep your blueprints updated with work item progress and re-plan milestones if things slip.
Server & Cloud Bugs (caribou)

The discussion about “Server & Cloud Bugs (caribou)” started at 16:03.

  • No updates
Weekly Updates & Questions for the QA Team (psivaa)

The discussion about “Weekly Updates & Questions for the QA Team (psivaa)” started at 16:05.

  • No updates
Weekly Updates & Questions for the Kernel Team (smb, sforshee)

The discussion about “Weekly Updates & Questions for the Kernel Team (smb, sforshee)” started at 16:05.

  • James Page reports that iscsitarget 12.04 DKMS updates for HWE
    • kernels are ready and uploaded to trusty-proposed awaiting SRU team review (bug 1262712)
  • The KSM on NUMA + KVM bug (1346917) is making great progress, driven
    • by Chris Arges. Brad Figg reports that an upload to trusty-proposed is imminent, and it should land on August 8th (the day after 12.04.5). 12.04.5 (for the HWE kernel) won’t include the update, but one will be available for it the next day.
  • For kernel SRU cadence updates, see
Ubuntu Server Team Events

The discussion about “Ubuntu Server Team Events” started at 16:17.

  • rbasak noted that the Canonical Server Team have been sprinting in
    • #ubuntu-server on Fridays to complete merges, including mentoring and sponsoring, and that all are welcome to join them.
Open Discussion

The discussion about “Open Discussion” started at 16:18.

  • James Page reported that there are plans to SRU docker 1.0.x to
    • 14.04 in bug 1338768. The proposed uploaded is in a PPA and awaiting review from the SRU team. Testers are encouraged to try it out.
Agree on next meeting date and time

Next meeting will be on Tuesday, August 4th at 16:00 UTC in #ubuntu-meeting. Note that this was stated incorrectly in the meeting itself. The chair will be Liam Young.

Ubuntu Kernel Team: Kernel Team Meeting Minutes – July 29, 2014

Planet Ubuntu - Tue, 2014-07-29 17:18
Meeting Minutes

IRC Log of the meeting.

Meeting minutes.

Agenda

20140729 Meeting Agenda


Release Metrics and Incoming Bugs

Release metrics and incoming bug data can be reviewed at the following link:

http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/reports/kt-meeting.txt


Status: Utopic Development Kernel

The Utopic kernel has been rebased to v3.16-rc7 and uploaded to the
archive, ie. linux-3.13.0-6.11. Please test and let us know your
results. I also want to mention 14.04.1 released last Thursday
July 24 and 12.04.5 is scheduled to release next Thurs Aug 7.
—–
Important upcoming dates:
Thurs Aug 07 – 12.04.5 (~1 week away)
Thurs Aug 21 – Utopic Feature Freeze (~3 weeks away)


Status: CVE’s

The current CVE status can be reviewed at the following link:

http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/cve/pkg/ALL-linux.html


Status: Stable, Security, and Bugfix Kernel Updates – Trusty/Saucy/Precise/Lucid

Status for the main kernels, until today (Jul. 22):

  • Lucid – Released
  • Precise – Released
  • Saucy – Released
  • Trusty – Released

    Current opened tracking bugs details:

  • http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/reports/kernel-sru-workflow.html

    For SRUs, SRU report is a good source of information:

  • http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/reports/sru-report.html

    Schedule:

    14.04.1 cycle: 29-Jun through 07-Aug
    ====================================================================
    27-Jun Last day for kernel commits for this cycle
    29-Jun – 05-Jul Kernel prep week.
    06-Jul – 12-Jul Bug verification & Regression testing.
    13-Jul – 19-Jul Regression testing & Release to -updates.
    20-Jul – 24-Jul Release prep
    24-Jul 14.04.1 Release [1]
    07-Aug 12.04.5 Release [2]

    cycle: 08-Aug through 29-Aug
    ====================================================================
    08-Aug Last day for kernel commits for this cycle
    10-Aug – 16-Aug Kernel prep week.
    17-Aug – 23-Aug Bug verification & Regression testing.
    24-Aug – 29-Aug Regression testing & Release to -updates.

    [1] This will be the very last kernels for lts-backport-quantal, lts-backport-raring,
    and lts-backport-saucy.

    [2] This will be the lts-backport-trusty kernel as the default in the precise point
    release iso.


Open Discussion or Questions? Raise your hand to be recognized

No open discussions.

Kubuntu Wire: Rohan on ubuntuonair.com

Planet Ubuntu - Tue, 2014-07-29 16:07

Kubuntu Ninja Rohan was on today’s ubuntuonair talking about Plasma 5 and what is happening in Kubuntu.  Watch it now to hear the news.

 

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