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Kubuntu Wire: Plasma 5 in the News

Planet Ubuntu - Wed, 2014-07-16 15:14

Plasma 5 was released yesterday and the internet is ablaze with praise and delight at the results.

Slashdot just posted their story KDE Releases Plasma 5 and the first comment is “Thank our KDE developers for their hard work. I’m really impressed by KDE and have used it a lot over the years.“  You’re welcome Slashdot reader.

They point to themukt’s Details Review of Plasma 5 which rightly says “Don’t be fooled, a lot of work goes down there“.

The science fictional name reflects the futuristic technology which is already ahead of its time (companies like Apple, Microsoft, Google and Canonical are using ideas conceptualized or developed by the KDE community).

With the release of Plasma 5, the community has once again shown that free software code developed without any dictator or president or prime-minister or chancellor can be one of the best software code.

LWN has a short story on KDE Plasma 5.0 which is as usual the place to go for detailed comments including several from KDE developers.

ZDNet’s article KDE Plasma 5 Linux desktop arrives says “I found this new KDE Plasma 5 to be a good, solid desktop” and concludes “I expect most, if not all, KDE users to really enjoy this new release. Have fun!” And indeed we do have lots of fun.

And Techage gets nonenculture wrong in KDE 5 is Here: Introducing a Cleaner Frontend & An Overhauled Backend and says “On behalf of KDE fans everywhere, thank you, KDE dev team” aah, it’s nice to be thanked

Web UPD8 has How To Install KDE Plasma 5 In Kubuntu 14.10 Or 14.04 a useful guide to setting it up which even covers removing it when you want to go back to the old stuff.  Give it a try!

 

Jorge Castro: Brightbox now offering official Ubuntu images

Planet Ubuntu - Wed, 2014-07-16 14:57

Today we announced that Brightbox has joined the Ubuntu Certified Cloud programme, and is our first European Cloud Partner.

If you’re wondering where have you heard the name Brightbox before, it might be because they contribute updated Ruby packages for all Ubuntu users.

Official images that stay up to day, updated Ruby stacks for developers, it’s pretty much win-win for Ubuntu users!

Raphaël Hertzog: Spotify migrate 5000 servers from Debian to Ubuntu

Planet Ubuntu - Wed, 2014-07-16 08:07

Or yet another reason why it’s really important that we succeed with Debian LTS. Last year we heard of Dreamhost switching to Ubuntu because they can maintain a stable Ubuntu release for longer than a Debian stable release (and this despite the fact that Ubuntu only supports software in its main section, which misses a lot of popular software).

A few days ago, we just learned that Spotify took a similar decision:

A while back we decided to move onto Ubuntu for our backend server deployment. The main reasons for this was a predictable release cycle and long term support by upstream (this decision was made before the announcement that the Debian project commits to long term support as well.) With the release of the Ubuntu 14.04 LTS we are now in the process of migrating our ~5000 servers to that distribution.

This is just a supplementary proof that we have to provide long term support for Debian releases if we want to stay relevant in big deployments.

But the task is daunting and it’s difficult to find volunteers to do the job. That’s why I believe that our best answer is to get companies to contribute financially to Debian LTS.

We managed to convince a handful of companies already and July is the first month where paid contributors have joined the effort for a modest participation of 21 work hours (watch out for Thorsten Alteholz and Holger Levsen on debian-lts and debian-lts-announce). But we need to multiply this figure by 5 or 6 at least to make a correct work of maintaining Debian 6.

So grab the subscription form and have a chat with your management. It’s time to convince your company to join the initiative. Don’t hesitate to get in touch if you have questions or if you prefer that I contact a representative of your company. Thank you!

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Jonathan Riddell: Plasma 5 is Here! All Ready to Eat Your Babies

Planet Ubuntu - Tue, 2014-07-15 20:32
KDE Project:

A year and a half ago Qt 5 was released giving KDE the opportunity and excuse to do the sort of tidying up that software always needs every few years. We decided that, like Qt, we weren't going for major rewrites of the world as we did for KDE 4. Rather we'd modularise, update and simplify. Last week I clicked the publish button on the story for KDE Frameworks 5, the refresh of kdelibs. Interesting for developers. Today I clicked the publish button on the story of the first major piece of software to use KDE Frameworks, Plasma 5.

Plasma is KDE's desktop. It's also the tablet interface and media centre but those ports are still a work in progress. The basic layout of the desktop hasn't changed, we know you don't want to switch to a new workflow for no good reason. But it is cleaner and more slick. It's also got plenty of bugs in it, this release won't be the default in Kubuntu, but we will make a separate image for you to try it out. We're not putting it in the Ubuntu archive yet for the same reason but you can try it out if you are brave.

Three options to try it out:

1) On Kubuntu, Project Neon is available as PPAs which offers frequently updated development snapshots of KDE Frameworks. Packages will be installed to /opt/project-neon5 and will co-install with your normal environment and installs to 14.04.

sudo apt-add-repository ppa:neon/kf5 apt update apt install project-neon5-session project-neon5-utils project-neon5-konsole

Log out and in again
2) Releases of KDE Frameworks 5 and Plasma 5 are being packaged in the next PPA. These will replace your Plasma 4 install and installs to Utopic development version.

sudo apt-add-repository ppa:kubuntu-ppa/next sudo apt-add-repository ppa:ci-train-ppa-service/landing-005 apt update apt install kubuntu-plasma5-desktop apt full-upgrade

Log out and in again
3) Finally the Neon 5 Live image, updated every Friday with latest source from Git to run a full system from a USB disk.

Good luck! let us know how you get on using #PlasmaByKDE on Twitter or posting to Kubuntu's G+ or Facebook pages.

Sebastian Kügler: Plasma 5 Ingredients

Planet Ubuntu - Tue, 2014-07-15 12:54

Plasma 5.0 is out. I’ve compiled a (non-exhaustive) list of ingredients and that have been put into this release to give the reader an estimate of the dimensions of the project and the achievement of this milestone:

  • 46 kilo of espresso (pure arabica)
  • The milk of 3 cows
  • a Swiss mountain of chocolate
  • 140 sleepless nights mulling over code
  • 354 liters of pressurized air breathed during scuba dives
  • One encounter with a Mantis shrimp
  • The total length of 43 bathtubs full of tiger tails fixed in pixel-alignment problems
  • 817 hours spent in front of webcams
  • 189MB of irc lines written (compressed)
  • 80.000 automated builds to keep us in check
  • 2403 bugs in the code that had to die
  • A swimming-pool full of tears cried over graphics driver problems and crashers buried deep down in scripting engines, scenegraphs and (the pool allegedly was previously used for skateboarding by Greg KH)
  • 5 magic wands
  • 800 million pixels
  • 37843200000 frames rendered
  • Too many puppies
  • 7 virtual goats sacrificed during a total of 28 full moon ceremonies
  • 450 ml of holy water
  • 76 rock bands
  • 119 beats per minute
  • 8 bits alpha channels
  • 52 WTFs
  • The equivalent of 3 dead trees in recycled paper
  • 2 small branches of cederwood for pencils
  • 1 box of crayons

Nothing like entirely made-up statistics.

tl;dr:

Plasma == ♥

… but also some really hard work, made possible by the sacrifices (see above) of many great people.

Lubuntu Blog: Box support for MATE

Planet Ubuntu - Mon, 2014-07-14 23:47
The Box theme support continues growing, covering more and more environments. Now we're celebrating that the MATE desktop environment, a GTK3 fork of the traditional Gnome2, will have its own Ubuntu flavour, named Ubuntu MATE Remix. Once tested, I noticed I missed something familiar, our beloved Lubuntu spirit on it. So here begins the (experimental) theme support. It'll be available to download

Nicholas Skaggs: Utopic Test Writing Hackfest

Planet Ubuntu - Mon, 2014-07-14 18:09
We're having our first hackfest of the utopic cycle this week on Tuesday, July 15th. You can catch us live in a hangout on ubuntuonair.com starting at 1900 UTC. Everything you need to know can be found on the wiki page for the event.

During the hangout, we'll be demonstrating writing a new manual testcase, as well as reviewing writing automated testcases. We'll be answering any questions you have as well about contributing a testcase.

We need your help to write some new testcases! We're targeting both manual and automated testcase, so everyone is welcome to pitch in.

We are looking at writing and finishing some testcases for ubuntu studio and some other flavors. All you need is some basic tester knowledge and the ability to write in English.

If you know python, we are also going to be hacking on the toolkit helper for autopilot for the ubuntu sdk. That's a mouthful! Specifically it's the helpers that we use for writing autopilot tests against ubuntu-sdk applications. All app developers make use of these helpers, and we need more of them to ensure we have good coverage for all components developers use. 

Don't worry about getting stuck, we'll be around to help, and there's guides to well, guide you!

Hope to see everyone there!

Ubuntu App Developer Blog: Content Hub to replace Friends API

Planet Ubuntu - Mon, 2014-07-14 16:52

As part of the continued development of the Ubuntu platform, the Content Hub has gained the ability to share links (and soon text) as a content type, just as it has been able to share images and other file-based content in the past. This allows applications to more easily, and more consistently, share things to a user’s social media accounts.

Consolidating APIs


Thanks to the collaborative work going on between the Content Hub and the Ubuntu Webapps developers, it is now possible for remote websites to be packaged with local user scripts that provide deep integration with our platform services. One of the first to take advantage of this is the Facebook webapp, which while displaying remote content via a web browser wrapper, is also a Content Hub importer. This means that when you go to share an image from the Gallery app, the Facebook webapp is displayed as an optional sharing target for that image. If you select it, it will use the Facebook web interface to upload that image to your timeline, without having to go through the separate Friends API.

This work not only brings the social sharing user experience inline with the rest of the system’s content sharing experience, it also provide a much simpler API for application developers to use for accomplishing the same thing. As a result, the Friends API is being deprecated in favor of the new Content Hub functionality.

What it means for App Devs

Because this is an API change, there are things that you as an app developer need to be aware of. First, though the API is being deprecated immediately, it is not being removed from the device images until after the release of 14.10, which will continue to support the ubuntu-sdk-14.04 framework which included the Friends API. The API will not be included in the final ubuntu-sdk-14.10 framework, or any new 14.10-dev frameworks after -dev2.

After the 14.10 release in October, when device images start to build for utopic+1, the ubuntu-sdk-14.04 framework will no longer be on the images. So if you haven’t updated your Click package by then to use the ubuntu-sdk-14.10 framework, it won’t be available to install on devices with the new image. If you are not using the Friends API, this would simply be a matter of changing your package metadata to the new framework version.  For new apps, it will default to the newer version to begin with, so you shouldn’t have to do anything.

David Tomaschik: Passing Android Traffic through Burp

Planet Ubuntu - Sun, 2014-07-13 20:57

I wanted to take a look at all HTTP(S) traffic coming from an Android device, even if applications made direct connections without a proxy, so I set up a transparent Burp proxy. I decided to put the Proxy on my Kali VM on my laptop, but didn't want to run an AP on there, so I needed to get the traffic to there.

Network Setup

The diagram shows that my wireless lab is on a separate subnet from the rest of my network, including my laptop. The lab network is a NAT run by IPTables on the Virtual Router. While I certainly could've ARP poisoned the connection between the Internet Router and the Virtual Router, or even added a static route, I wanted a cleaner solution that would be easier to enable/disable.

Setting up the Redirect

I decided to use IPTables on the virtual router to redirect the traffic to my Kali Laptop. Furthermore, I decided to enable/disable the redirect based on logging in/out via SSH, but I needed to make sure the redirect would get torn down even if there's not a clean logout: i.e., the VM crashes, the SSH connection gets interrupted, etc. Enter pam_exec. By using the pam_exec module, we can have an arbitrary command run on log in/out, which can setup and reset the IPTables REDIRECT via an SSH tunnel to my Burp Proxy.

In order to get the command executed on any login/logout, I added the following line to /etc/pam.d/common-session:

session optional pam_exec.so log=/var/log/burp.log /opt/burp.sh

This launches the following script, that checks if its being invoked for the right user, for SSH sessions, and then inserts or deletes the relevant IPTables rules.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32#!/bin/bash BURP_PORT=8080 BURP_USER=tap LAN_IF=eth1 set -o nounset function ipt_command { ACTION=$1 echo iptables -t nat $ACTION PREROUTING -i $LAN_IF -p tcp -m multiport --dports 80,443 -j REDIRECT --to-ports $BURP_PORT\; echo iptables $ACTION INPUT -i $LAN_IF -p tcp --dport $BURP_PORT -j ACCEPT\; } if [ $PAM_USER != $BURP_USER ] ; then exit 0 fi if [ $PAM_TTY != "ssh" ] ; then exit 0 fi if [ $PAM_TYPE == "open_session" ] ; then CMD=`ipt_command -I` elif [ $PAM_TYPE == "close_session" ] ; then CMD=`ipt_command -D` fi date echo $CMD eval $CMD

This redirects all traffic incoming from $LAN_IF destined for ports 80 and 443 to local port 8080. This does have the downside of missing traffic on other ports, but this will get nearly all HTTP(S) traffic.

Of course, since the IPTables REDIRECT target still maintains the same interface as the original incoming connection, we need to allow our SSH Port Forward to bind to all interfaces. Add this line to /etc/ssh/sshd_config and restart SSH:

GatewayPorts clientspecified Setting up Burp and SSH

Burp's setup is pretty straightforward, but since we're not configuring a proxy in our client application, we'll need to use invisible proxying mode. I actually put invisible proxying on a separate port (8081) so I have 8080 setup as a regular proxy. I also use the per-host certificate setting to get the "best" SSL experience.

It turns out that there's an issue with OpenJDK 6 and SSL certificates. Apparently it will advertise algorithms not actually available, and then libnss will throw an exception, causing the connection to fail, and the client will retry with SSLv3 without SNI, preventing Burp from creating proper certificates. It can be worked around by disabling NSS in Java. In /etc/java-6-openjdk/security/java.security, comment out the line with security.provider.9=sun.security.pkcs11.SunPKCS11 ${java.home}/lib/security/nss.cfg.

Forwarding the port over to the wifilab server is pretty straightforward. You can either use the -R command-line option, or better, set things up in ~/.ssh/config.

Host wifitap User tap Hostname wifilab RemoteForward *:8080 localhost:8081

This logs in as user tap on host wifilab, forwarding local port 8081 to port 8080 on the wifilab machine. The * for a hostname is to ensure it binds to all interfaces (0.0.0.0), not just localhost.

Setting up Android

At this point, you should have a good setup for intercepting traffic from any client of the WiFi lab, but since I started off wanting to intercept Android traffic, let's optimize for that by installing our certificate. You can install it as a user certificate, but I'd rather do it as a system cert, and my testing tablet is already rooted, so it's easy enough.

You'll want to start by exporting the certificate from Burp and saving it to a file, say burp.der.

Android's system certificate store is in /system/etc/security/cacerts, and expects OpenSSL-hashed naming, like a0b1c2d3.0 for the certificate names. Another complication is that it's looking for PEM-formatted certificates, and the export from Burp is DER-formatted. We'll fix all that up in one chain of OpenSSL commands:

(openssl x509 -inform DER -outform PEM -in burp.der; openssl x509 -inform DER -in burp.der -text -fingerprint -noout ) > /tmp/`openssl x509 -inform DER -in burp.der -subject_hash -noout`.0

Android before ICS (4.0) uses OpenSSL versions below 1.0.0, so you'll need to use -subject_hash_old if you're using an older version of Android. Installing is a pretty simple task (replace HASH.0 with the filename produced by the command above):

$ adb push HASH.0 /tmp/HASH.0 $ adb shell android$ su android# mount -o remount,rw /system android# cp /tmp/HASH.0 /system/etc/security/cacerts/ android# chmod 644 /system/etc/security/cacerts/HASH.0 android# reboot

Connect your Android device to your WiFi lab, ssh wifitap from your Kali install running Burp, and you should see your HTTP(S) traffic in Burp (excepting apps that use pinned certificates, that's another matter entirely). You can check your installed certificate from the Android Security Settings.

Good luck with your Android auditing!

Colin King: a final few more features in stress-ng

Planet Ubuntu - Sun, 2014-07-13 16:47
While hoping to get a feature complete stress-ng sooner than later, I found a few more ways to fiendishly stress a system.

Stress-ng 0.01.22 will be landing soon in Ubuntu 14.10 with three more stress mechanisms:
  • CPU affinity stressing; this rapidly changes CPU affinity of the stress processes just to keep the scheduling busy wasting effort.
  • Timer stressing using the real-time clock; this allows one to generate a large amount of timer interrupts, so it is a useful interrupt saturation test.
  • Directory entry thrashing; this creates and deletes a selectable number of zero length files and hence populates and destroys directory entries.
I have also removed the need to use rand() for random number generation for some of the stress tests and re-used a the faster MWC "random" number generator to add in some well known and very simple math operations for CPU stressing.

Stress-ng now has 15 different simple stress mechanisms that exercise CPU, cache, memory, file system, I/O and CPU schedulers.  I could add more tests, but I think this is a large enough set to allow one to thrash a machine and see how well it performs under pressure.

Lubuntu Blog: PCManFM 1.2.1

Planet Ubuntu - Sat, 2014-07-12 15:34
Another update of our file manager PCManFM, tones of bug fixes and new implementations: fixed dragging and dropping icons behavior fixed icons positioning fixed resetting cursor in location bar corrected folder popup update on loading reordered ‘View’ menu item implemented drawing icons of dragged items etc. Also a huge update and bug fixing in libfm libraries (1.2.1) too. You can use

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