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Kubuntu Wire: Univention Corporate Client 2.0 – First milestone released

Planet Ubuntu - Fri, 2014-05-16 12:37

Univention Corporate Client is a derivative of Kubuntu for commercial customers.  It comes with a bunch of advanced administrative tools to make configuration easier for say Samba.

Version 2.0 has just been released and it comes with an update to Kubuntu 14.04 LTS.

You can download an ISO to test from the UCC page.

Univention Corporant Client 1.0

Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S07E07 – The One with the Jellyfish

Planet Ubuntu - Fri, 2014-05-16 08:14

Alan Pope, Mark Johnson, Tony Whitmore, and Laura Cowen are in Studio L for Season Seven, Episode Seven of the Ubuntu Podcast!

 Download OGG  Download MP3 Play in Popup

In this week’s show:-

We’ll be back next week, when we’ll interview Graham Morrison from Linux Voice and go through your feedback.

Please send your comments and suggestions to: podcast@ubuntu-uk.org
Join us on IRC in #uupc on Freenode
Leave a voicemail via phone: +44 (0) 203 298 1600, sip: podcast@sip.ubuntu-uk.org and skype: ubuntuukpodcast
Follow us on Twitter
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Valorie Zimmerman: Today's catch-up meeting with the Ubuntu Community Council

Planet Ubuntu - Fri, 2014-05-16 05:11
The Kubuntu team has been thinking about what to bring up to the CC for a few weeks, and at our Mumble meeting, discussed it there as well. Rohan Garg, Scott Kitterman, and Philip Muscovac (Shadeslayer, ScottK, and Yofel) attended with me (thank goodness!).

We put all our discussion items on a wiki page: https://wiki.kubuntu.org/Kubuntu/CCmeeting. Since the moin moin wiki is unreliable, here is our list:

Summing up -- PAST

Since last year, the threats of legal action against Mint and other derivative distributions have upset our community. We were disappointed in the reaction of the CC -- it seemed to us that the CC was just doing as Canonical directed, rather than work with Mint to bring them into the community.

We continue to feel apprehension over Wayland/Mir situation, which has brought the Ubuntu brand into controversy, and has caused a lot of bad feelings from our upstream. We hope for peace and technical excellence.

We are missing our face-to-face UDS meetings with the rest of the Ubuntu community. Last year and again this year we've arranged a Kubuntu meeting at the KDE yearly meeting, Akademy. Last year we met in Bilbao, this year it will be held in Brno, in the Czech Republic. However, we really miss being able to touch base with the rest of the Ubuntu community.

PRESENT
We have our own webserver now, at Kubuntu.co.uk. Kubuntu.org will be moved there soon.

We're now using the KDE wikis to develop our user docs, and some community wiki pages. Moin moin is just not reliable. We've gained some more translations this way for the documentation. We ran out of people who were experts in Docbook, which is why we started using the MM wiki.  http://userbase.kde.org/Kubuntu is for writing; when docs are done they are moved to the website.

We are wondering about the state of donations. On the donations page, a report is promised, but we've not seen one, and none are linked to. http://community.ubuntu.com/help-information/funding/

FUTURE

Discussing how to handle KDE's new Frameworks, Plasma Next, and new Qt. In 14.10 we'll be rather conservative, and offer the newest stuff being released this summer in a PPA. We may be able to spin an ISO of this software; we are still pondering our best path forward.


It was encouraging to hear from Mark Shuttleworth during the meeting, as well as Jono on the funding report. I'm not sure any issues were resolved, but it did feel like the air was cleared.

Full text of the meeting is here: http://irclogs.ubuntu.com/2014/05/15/%23ubuntu-meeting.html#t17:39. Thanks to tsimpson for the link. :-)

Ante Karamatić: Dell XPS 13 cracking sound – solution

Planet Ubuntu - Fri, 2014-05-16 04:03

Few days ago I made a switch from Lenovo x200s to Dell XPS 13. I was always a ThinkPad fan. I really think these were the best laptops ever. Again, were. Unfortunately, Lenovo joined a mindless hype of copying Apple. They didn’t stop there, they went even further. They actually managed to remove function keys (F1, F2…) and, in general, they managed to destroy the best laptop keyboard ever. Just take a look at that nonsense they put on X1 Carbon. Ah well, long story short, ever since Lenovo took over ThinkPad, that brand degraded in every possible way. Too bad.

New XPS 13 is in no way better than ThinkPad. It’s even worse (TrackPoint is best invention ever), but I’ve decided to give Dell a chance since they do ship Ubuntu and cause XPS 13 really looks good! It also has decent specs and in general is a decent laptop. I can’t imagine myself doing any serious work on it, but that’s becoming a common theme on laptops – they have become movie players (too bad; they will lose that war with tablets). Funny thing is that I got myself a Lenovo workstation for that serious work :)

Anyway… Dell continues to ship XPS 13 with really nasty sound coming from these machines. With default setup, on Ubuntu welcome screen, one can hear cracking. The noise is very bad and provides very unpleasant experience. It makes me wonder if Dell actually powered on one of these machines and at least check if sound and screen come up. Upgrading to 14.04 didn’t resolve the problem. Googling revealed that the same problem exists even with Windows. Oh my, my…

After some testing I found a solution for the problem. Since I’ve noticed lots of peoole have that same problem, I’ve decided to write this blog, even though I haven’t written anything for 2 years :) Pretty much, all you have to do is enable power saving for Intel HDA:

echo “options snd_hda_intel model=dell-headset-multi,dell-headset-multi power_save=1″ | sudo tee /etc/modprobe.d/omg-dell.conf

sudo depmod

On next reboot, cracking sound will be gone.

I’ve also noticed that idle cpu and enabled keyboard backlit also produce different noise. Hopefully, solution for that one will come in an update to this post.

Svetlana Belkin: Stuck With Ubuntu Touch!

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 2014-05-15 22:33

As I said in this post, I installed Ubuntu Touch 14.04 on my Nexus 7 and today I tried to restore my tablet back to Google Nexus 7 stock (factory) image but it failed on me.  I asked a question on AskUbuntu and now I’m waiting for an answer.  But another thought came to me and it’s the thought of if I keep on playing around/testing it, it would be better for everyone.  Then I can submit feedback to the developers and help to improve Ubuntu Touch!

Anyhow, I have Ubuntu Touch on the dev channel so I will have more of an up to date version of Ubuntu Touch.  There is already some features fixed, such as a way to uninstall click apps and it doesn’t crash as often.  But still some of the important basic features are missing, such as an notice that the user is shutting down the ptablet and a way to close/kill an app.  Maybe I need to write an e-mail with the feedback to the developers.


Jorge Castro: Vagrant boxes with Juju now available

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 2014-05-15 18:30

For those of you using Vagrant we are now listing our Juju Vagrant boxes here:

For those of you on OSX and Windows this is a slick way to get Juju with the GUI out of the box deploying to containers for a nice local development resource. Here are the docs on how to use them if you are unfamiliar with Vagrant.

Just how popular is Ubuntu with Vagrant users? 7 out of the top 10!

And just a reminder that we’ll be using these tomorrow (Friday) during our charm school on using Juju with Vagrant, see you at 1500 EDT on #juju and http://ubuntuonair.com!

Luis de Bethencourt: GStreamer and emacs

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 2014-05-15 18:18
Debug logs are an extremely helpful tool in the GStreamer developer's toolbox.
Most will say you can't live without them.

Something I've always missed when reading them is a convenient way to jump back and forth between the logs and the source code. So I went ahead and wrote an emacs mini mode that does exactly this:

emacs-gstreamer
an emacs mini module to navigate GStreamer debug logs.


When hitting Enter or M-. in a log file it will open the source code to the line that generated that debug message. If you have multiple emacs windows open, it will open the GStreamer source code file in the second to last active so you can continue reading the log in the active window. If you only have one window open it will open the source code file in the current one. After that you can use your favorite window and buffer handling to surf the files. Read, learn, write, and develop.

To get it running you need to have loaded a tags table with the source code. Read this other article to learn how. I run it as part of my gst-uninstalled script.
Then just run M-x gst-debug in the debug log file's buffer.

Let me know if it helps your development workflow!

Martin Albisetti: A story on finding an elusive security bug and managing it responsibly

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 2014-05-15 14:07

Now that all the responsible disclosure processes have been followed through, I’d like to tell everyone a story of my very bad week last week. Don’t worry, it has a happy ending.

 

Part 1: Exposition

On May 5th we got a support request from a user who observed confusing behaviour in one of our systems. Our support staff immediately escalated it to me and my team sprung into action for what ended up being a 48-hour rollercoaster ride that ended with us reporting upstream to Django a security bug.

The bug, in a nutshell, is that when the following conditions lines up, a system could end up serving a request to one user that was meant for another:

- You are authenticating requests with cookies, OAuth or other authentication mechanisms
- The user is using any version of Internet Explorer or Chromeframe (to be more precise, anything with “MSIE” in the request user agent)
- You (or an ISP in the middle) are caching requests between Django and the internet (except Varnish’s default configuration, for reasons we’ll get to)
- You are serving the same URL with different content to different users

We rarely saw this combination of conditions because users of services provided by Canonical generally have a bias towards not using Internet Explorer, as you’d expect from a company who develops the world’s most used Linux distribution.

 

Part 2: Rising Action

Now, one may think that the bug is obvious, and wonder how it went unnoticed since 2008, but this really was one was one of those elusive “ninja-bugs” you hear about on the Internet and it took us quite a bit of effort to track it down.

In debugging situations such as this, the first step is generally to figure out how to reproduce the bug. In fact, figuring out how to reproduce it is often the lion’s share of the effort of fixing it.  However, no matter how much we tried we could not reproduce it. No matter what we changed, we always got back the right request. This was good, because it ruled out a widespread problem in our systems, but did not get us closer to figuring out the problem.

Putting aside reproducing it for a while, we then moved on to combing very carefully through our code, trying to find any hints of what could be causing this. Several of us looked at it with fresh eyes so we wouldn’t be tainted by having developed or reviewed the code, but we all still came up empty each and every time. Our code seemed perfectly correct.

We then went on to a close examination of all related requests to get new clues to where the problem was hiding. But we had a big challenge with this. As developers we don’t get access to any production information that could identify people. This is good for user privacy, of course, but made it hard to produce useful logs. We invested some effort to work around this while maintaining user privacy by creating a way to anonymise the logs in a way that would still let us find patterns in them. This effort turned up the first real clue.

We use Squid to cache data for each user, so that when they re-request the same data, it’s queued up right in memory and can be quickly served to them without having to recreate the data from the databases and other services. In those anonymized  Squid logs, we saw cookie-authenticated requests that didn’t contain an HTTP Vary header at all, where we expected it to have at the very least “Vary: Cookie” to ensure Squid would only serve the correct content all the time. So we then knew what was happening, but not why. We immediately pulled Squid out of the middle to stop this from happening.

Why was Squid not logging Vary headers? There were many possible culprits for this, so we got a *lot* of people were involved searching for the problem. We combed through everything in our frontend stack (Apache, Haproxy and Squid) that could sometimes remove Vary headers.

This was made all the harder because we had not yet fully Juju charmed every service, so could not easily access all configurations and test theories locally. Sometimes technical debt really gets expensive!

After this exhaustive search, we determined that nothing our code removed headers. So we started following the code up to Django middlewares, and went as far as logging the exact headers Django was sending out at the last middleware layer. Still nothing.

 

Part 3: The Climax

Until we got a break. Logs were still being generated, and eventually a pattern emerged. All the initial requests that had no Vary headers seemed for the most part to be from Internet Explorer. It didn’t make sense that a browser could remove headers that were returned from a server, but knowing this took us to the right place in the Django code, and because Django is open source, there was no friction in inspecting it deeply.  That’s when we saw it.

In a function called fix_IE_for_vary, we saw the offending line of code.

del response['Vary']

We finally found the cause.

It turns out IE 6 and 7 didn’t have the HTTP Vary header implemented fully, so there’s a workaround in Django to remove it for any content that isn’t html or plain text. In hindsight, if Django would of implemented this instead as a middleware, even if default, it would have been more likely that this would have been revised earlier. Hindsight is always 20/20 though, and it easy to sit back and theorise on how things should have been done.

So if you’ve been serving any data that wasn’t html or plain text with a caching layer in the middle that implements Vary header management to-spec (Varnish doesn’t trust it by default, and checks the cookie in the request anyway), you may have improperly returned a request.

Newer versions if Internet Explorer have since fixed this, but who knew in 2008 IE 9 would come 3 years later?

 

Part 4: Falling Action

We immediately applied a temporary fix to all our running Django instances in Canonical and involved our security team to follow standard responsible disclosure processes. The Canonical security team was now in the driving seat and worked to assign a CVE number and email the Django security contact with details on the bug, how to reproduce it and links to the specific code in the Django tree.

The Django team immediately and professionally acknowledged the bug and began researching possible solutions as well as any other parts of the code where this scenario could occur. There was continuous communication among our teams for the next few days while we agreed on lead times for distributions to receive and prepare the security fix,

 

Part 5: Resolution

I can’t highlight enough how important it is to follow these well-established processes to make sure we keep the Internet at large a generally safe place.
To summarise, if you’re running Django, please update to the latest security release as quickly as possible, and disable any internal caching until then to minimise the chances of hitting this bug.

If you're running squid and want to check if you could be affected, here's a small python script to run against your logs we put together you can use as a base, you may need to tweak it based on your log format. Be sure to run it only against cookie-authenticated URLs, otherwise you will hit a lot of false positives.

Canonical Design Team: The browser is dead. Long live the browser!

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 2014-05-15 13:12

With the unstoppable rise of mobile apps, some pundits within the tech industry have hastily demoted the mobile web to a second-class citizen, or even dismissed it as ‘dead’. Who cares about websites and webapps when you can deliver a superior user experience with a native app?

Well, we care because the reality is a bit different. New apps are hard to discover; their content is locked, with no way to access it from the outside. People browse the web more than ever on their mobile phones. The browser is the most used app on the phone, both as starting point and a destination in the user journey.


Source: xkcd

At Ubuntu, we decided to focus on improving the user experience of browsing and searching the web. Our approach is underpinned by our design principles, namely:

  1. Content is king: UI should recede in the background once user starts interacting with content
  2. Leverage natural interaction by using gestures and spatial metaphors.

In designing the browser, there’s one more principle we took into account. If content is our king, then recency should be our queen.

Recency is queen

People forget about things. That’s why tasks such as finding a page you visited yesterday or last week can be very hard: UIs are not designed to support the long-term memory of the user. For example, when browsing tabs on a smartphone touchscreen, it is hard to recognise what’s on screen as we forgot what that page is and why we arrived there.

Similarly, bookmarks are often a meaningless list of webpages, as their value was linked to the specific time when they were taken. For example, let’s imagine we are planning our next holiday and we start bookmarking a few interesting places. We may even create a new ‘holidays’ folder and add the bookmarks to it. However, once the holiday is the bookmarks are still there, they don’t expire once they have lost their value. This happens pretty much every time; old bookmarks and folders will eventually start cluttering our screen and make it difficult to find the information we need.

Therefore we redesigned tabs, history and bookmarks to display the most recent information first. Consequently, the display and the retrieval of information is simplified.

Browser tabs

In our browser, most recent tabs come first. Here is how it works:

In this way, users don’t have to painstakingly browse an endless list of tabs that may have been opened weeks or days ago, like in Mobile Safari or Chrome.

History

Browser history has not changed much since Netscape Navigator; modern browser still display a chronological log of all the web pages we visited starting from today. Finding a website or a page is hard because of the sheer amount of information. In our browser we employ a clustered model where you display the last visited websites, not every single page. On tap, you then display all webpages for that websites, starting from the most recent. In this way scanning the history log is much easier and less painful.

Loving the bottom edge

We believe the bottom edge is the most pleasurable edge to use. It is easily accessible at any time and ergonomically friendly to the typical one-hand phone hold. Once discovered, it will slowly build into our muscle memory and become a natural and intuitive way of interacting with the application.

This is why we combined tabs and history and made them accessible through the bottom edge. As a team, we spent months building and refining a sleek, intuitive and fluid user experience.

Here’s a sneak preview of how it will look like:


Video: Browser interactions

Bottom edge gesture will have three stages:

  1. Dragging from the bottom edge will hint and reveal the most recently viewed tab
  2. Continue dragging and the full tab spread is revealed
  3. Keep on dragging and browser history will be fully revealed.

All elements will support gestural interaction: user can swipe to delete a tab or a website from history.

That’s all for now. In the next blog post, we will talk more about gestural interaction in Browser. Stay tuned!

Stuart Langridge: Mozilla add HTML5 DRM, sadly but inevitably

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 2014-05-15 10:34

“If all your friends jumped off a bridge, would you jump too?”
“Oh jeez. Probably.”
“What!? Why!?”
“Because all my friends did.”

— xkcd, Bridge

Mozilla have decided to implement the HTML5 EME DRM for videos. This sucks.

I don’t like the EME stuff. It’s contrary to the whole idea of the web. It’s potentially the beginning of a slippery slope of web pages being locked off because that’s what the ebook people want. I wrote about this last year. Jeremy says that it is precisely because other technologies are locked down that it’s important to keep the web open, and he’s right.

But… that didn’t happen. The web is not open. Google and Microsoft and Apple have already started implementing EME, over the complaints of precisely nobody. The argument that adding DRMed video divides the web into haves and have-nots apparently didn’t cut any ice with those browser vendors. So Mozilla reluctantly fall in line, and are castigated for it in a way that the others weren’t.

Now, there’s a reasonable argument that Mozilla should be held to a higher standard, because their goal actually embodies the Open Web and the others are primarily about profits and market share. Mozilla should stand on principle, precisely because they have principles. I admire this argument, but unfortunately it’s like perpetual motion machines, the 200mpg carburettor, and the rehydrateable pizza from Back to the Future — it doesn’t work. The world isn’t nice just because you wish real hard. Mozilla have stood on principle in the past, by refusing to implement H.264 format video. It made no difference. They were laughed at for not being “modern”, their users just found that some videos mysteriously wouldn’t play, they were told that standing on principle made them irrelevant, and it made no difference to the market. They have a voice at the table, but it’s not loud enough to move the industry when the industry want something else.

The last people to try this other than Mozilla were Opera. The Opera team devoted their time to being standards compliant, working to improve those standards where possible, taking the decision to be correct rather than compatible in most cases, and what happened? Nobody used their browser because it didn’t work, and now they use Blink as their renderer instead.

I like the warm fuzzy feeling I get from knowing that Mozilla are out there doing the right thing. But there’s always been an edge of, well, they’re doing the right thing which means that I don’t have to. Firefox should stand on principle here and refuse to play DRMed videos… but of course I’m not going to stop using DRMed video, I’ll just use Safari for that. The warm fuzzy feeling is jolly nice, but it’s not enough to actually keep the Mozilla organisation running. If you dislike Mozilla doing this (which I do, too), then where’s the outcry against Apple and Microsoft and Google for doing the same thing? Where’s the outcry against them for doing it first? Mozilla helps keep the web open for us, but in return we have to help keep the web open for Mozilla. And we aren’t.

Benjamin Kerensa: On DRM and Firefox

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 2014-05-15 05:48

There has been a lot of criticism of Mozilla’s decision to move forward in implementing W3C EME, a web standard that the standards body has been working on for some time. While it is understandable that many are upset and believe that Mozilla is not honoring its values, the truth is there really is no other decision Mozilla can make while continuing to compete with other browsers.

The fact is, nearly 30% of Internet traffic today is Netflix, and Netflix is one of the content publishers pushing for this change along with other big names. If Mozilla were to choose not to implement this web standard, it would leave a significant portion of users with inability to access some of the locked content the a majority of users desire. A good portion of users would likely make a decision to leave Firefox rather quickly if this was not implemented and they were locked out.

So with that reality in mind, Mozilla has a choice to support this standard (which is not something the organization necessarily enjoys) or to not support it and lose much of its user base and have a very uncertain future.

“By open-sourcing the sandbox that limits the Adobe software’s access to the system, Mozilla is making it auditable and verifiable. This is a much better deal than users will get out of any of the rival browsers, like Safari, Chrome and Internet Explorer, and it is a meaningful and substantial difference.” – Cory Doctorow, The Guardian

The best thing that can be done right now is for users who are unhappy with the decision to continue to support Mozilla which will continue to fight for an open web. Users should also be vocal to the W3C and content publishers that are responsible for this web standard.

In closing Ben Moskowitz also wrote a great blog post on this topic explaining quite more in depth why Mozilla is in this position.

 

 

 

 

Joel Leclerc: About the Orchestral Tutorial Series, and other things

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 2014-05-15 04:30

Okay, first, I’m very sorry. I promised a person I’d finish it, and I didn’t.

Why? Well, the explanation is rather complicated, but simply put, I had issues with making universal instructions for installing each software, and then life got in the way, and it got forgotten (or rather “Oh, I have to do it sometime… I’m sure that publishing it tomorrow won’t hurt” XD).

But, I was also slightly hesitant, because I had figured out a potentially much better way of making music (no DAW, just JACK routing), but I had issues with that too.

So yeah, I’m really sorry about this. However, I’m also happy I waited, because I have learned much more about orchestral music production since (my new methods are completely different from my old ones).

I am not planning to finish it anytime soon though, because, as I said in the first post of the redux, I am working on my own DAW. But it’s much more (it’s a complete operating system …… that includes a custom-made kernel). I will not post any details about it, but as you can tell, this is a huge project.

I’m not working on it straight away though, because I need some more experience. The first step is to create our own programming language. The language we have planned is theoretically possible to implement, but would be significantly harder to write a compiler for than C or pretty much any other language. So yeah, I do need more experience XD

Anyways, for now, I’m working on a new game engine to gently get myself back into programming (I was working solely on music for a while), and I’m also working on a soundtrack for a friend’s animation (one of the musical ideas is the first one from here, if anyone’s interested: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FCJJjJcRIh8 ).

And to finish off this post, I just want to show a little bit of code I’m somewhat proud about (that was originally supposed to go in the game engine, but I have a feeling that this is not a good idea anymore XD). Made this today in about 15 mins :D  (took me a while to debug it…. rather obviously lol)

void rsc_ls_free(char**a){for(long j,i=0;!(((!(j=(long)a[i]))||(realloc((char*)j,0)))&&(!realloc(a,0)));i++);}


Paul Tagliamonte: Linode pv-grub chaining

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 2014-05-15 01:40

I've been using Linode since 2010, and many of my friends have heard me talk about how big a fan I am of linode. I've used Debian unstable on all my Linodes, since I often use them as a remote shell for general purpose Debian development. I've found my linodes to be indispensable, and I really love Linode.

The Problem

Recently, because of my work on Docker, I was forced to stop using the Linode kernel in favor of the stock Debian kernel, since the stock Linode kernel has no aufs support, and the default LVM-based devicemapper backend can be quite a pain.

The btrfs errors are ones I fully expect to be gone soon, I can't wait to switch back to using it.

I tried loading in btrfs support, and using that to host the Docker instance backed with btrfs, but it was throwing errors as well. Stuck with unstable backends, I wanted to use the aufs backend, which, dispite problems in aufs internally, is quite stable with Docker (and in general).

I started to run through the Linode Library's guide on PV-Grub, but that resulted in a cryptic error with xen not understanding the compression of the kernel. I checked for recent changes to the compresson, and lo, the Debian kernel has been switched to use xz compression in sid. Awesome news, really. XZ compression is awesome, and I've been super impressed with how universally we've adopted it in Debian. Keep it up! However, it appears only a newer pv-grub than the Linode hosts have installed will fix this.

After contacting the (ever friendly) Linode support, they were unable to give me a timeline on adding xz support, which would entail upgrading pv-grub. It was quite disapointing news, to be honest. Workarounds were suggested, but I'm not quite happy with them as proper solutions.

After asking in #debian-kernel, waldi was able to give me a few pointers, and the following is very inspired by him, the only thing that changed much was config tweaking, which was easy enough. Thanks, Bastian!

The Constraints

I wanted to maintain a 100% stock configuration from the kernel up. When I upgraded my kernel, I wanted to just work. I didn't want to unpack and repack the kernel, and I didn't want to install software outside main on my system. It had to be 100% Debian and unmodified.

The Solution It's pretty fun to attach to the lish console and watch bootup pass through GRUB 0.9, to GRUB 2.x to Linux. Free Software, Fuck Yeah.

Left unable to run my own kernel directly in the Linode interface, the tact here was to use Linode's old pv-grub to chain-load grub-xen, which loaded a modern kernel. Turns out this works great.

Let's start by creating a config for Linode's pv-grub to read and use.

sudo mkdir -p /boot/grub/

Now, since pv-grub is legacy grub, we can write out the following config to chain-load in grub-xen (which is just Grub 2.0, as far as I can tell) to /boot/grub/menu.lst. And to think, I almost forgot all about menu.lst. Almost.

default 1 timeout 3 title grub-xen shim root (hd0) kernel /boot/xen-shim boot

Just like riding a bike! Now, let's install and set up grub-xen to work for us.

sudo apt-get install grub-xen sudo update-grub

And, let's set the config for the GRUB image we'll create in the next step in the /boot/load.cf file:

configfile (xen/xvda)/boot/grub/grub.cfg

Now, lastly, let's generate the /boot/xen-shim file that we need to boot to:

grub-mkimage --prefix '(xen/xvda)/boot/grub' -c /boot/load.cf -O x86_64-xen /usr/lib/grub/x86_64-xen/*.mod > /boot/xen-shim

Next, change your boot configuration to use pv-grub, and give the machine a kick. Should work great! If you run into issues, use the lish shell to debug it, and let me know what else I should include in this post!

Hack on!

Svetlana Belkin: Evernote Workflow Design

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 2014-05-15 01:03

Evernote is what I was looking for since December 2012.  Before it, I looked at note-taking programs like KeepNote and Cherry Tree but they didn’t have multimedia (such as hand-written and audio notes).  And, as I said in my “Workflow (Re)Design” post, I’m looking for something that can tie in hand-written notes and typed notes and have them syncing between my four devices. It’s hard to believe that I overlooked at Evernote when it was suggested to me by someone on IRC.

And so for the last two hours, I have downloaded the .exe, since there is no Linux program for it yet, not even the clones are good, and installed it under WINE.  Like with all new programs or devices (or systems), I like to sit down and change the settings first to have the feel and the workflow that I need.  I hate to admit this but I never read the help files for anything.  I seem to apart of that culture that never read directions.  I also looked at how others are using Evernote.

Here is my plan:

* Have (at the moment) three notebooks that will be used for:

* Personal (Matters)
* School
* Ubuntu

* Use tags for “sub-notebooks”, Ubuntu Sense as an example
* Stack notes when need.  This will come useful for class notes for all of my classes.
* Use the Camera App to take photos of hand-written notes and other things.  Scanning will be used also.

Hopefully this will work out or else I will be stuck with my old workflow.

P.S. One good thing about Evernote is the notes that are stacked within the notebook is not dynamic like in M$ OneNote or BasketNotes.  That’s one thing that I hate about those type of programs.


Costales: Apps for Human Beings (pyGTK with Glade)

Planet Ubuntu - Wed, 2014-05-14 16:53
I really believe in the Ubuntu Promise,

"Ubuntu is [...] accessible to all".
I think this is one of the awesome things in this OS and community. A few years ago, I received a bug in Gufw:



THE PROBLEM
By example, I have 2 comboboxes:
"Deny" for "Incoming"

You can see if the "Deny" value is for "Incoming" or for "Outgoing".
But a visual impairment user will focus on "Deny" and ORCA will speech these options: "Allow, Deny, Reject":

"Allow, Deny, Reject" for... what?
... but... For what is that "Allow, Deny, Reject"? That is the question! We need to link the label with the widget! ;)
Link label to widget!
HOW TO FIX IT?
In Glade just link the label to its widget.

By example, you have 1 label for 1 button:
 
1 label for 1 button
Select the label and add an underline in its Label property (Alt+h will focus on that):

Add shortcuts

Set the underline (checking "User underline") & link the label to the widget (click on the pen and choose your desire widget, button_OS in this case):

Linking label with button
Take a look at the official documentation too :) Cheers!

Ubuntu App Developer Blog: Announcing Ubuntu Dual Boot with enhanced upgrades and more!

Planet Ubuntu - Wed, 2014-05-14 10:55

We’re thrilled to announce a new release of Ubuntu Dual boot, now supporting enhanced Ubuntu upgrades either from the Android or Ubuntu side.

The new Ubuntu Dualboot release, codenamed M9, enables developers to run both Ubuntu and Android on a single device and is packed with new features that make it the power tool to use for those doing development in both platforms.

For developers only

Dual boot is not a feature suitable for regular users. It is recommended to be installed only by developers who are comfortable with flashing devices and with their partition layout. Dual boot rewrites the Android recovery partition and those installing it should be intimately familiar with re-flashing it in case something goes wrong.

Multiple Android flavours are supported (AOSP or stock, CyanogenMod) and installation of Ubuntu can be done for all versions available in the regular distribution channels.

What’s new

The new release fixes a number of bugs, brings under-the-hood enhancements and includes a bunch of exciting features. Here are the highlights:

Enhanced Ubuntu upgrades

The most prominent feature is the addition of support for the upgrades on the Ubuntu side. Now image upgrades can be downloaded using the standard procedure in System Settings › Updates from Ubuntu. To complete the installation, a reboot to Android will have the Dualboot app pick up the downloaded image upgrade, install it in the right location and reboot to the new Ubuntu image.

As an alternative, installations can still be done fully on the Android side. In a nutshell:

  • Download of a new Ubuntu version can happen on either the Ubuntu or Android side
  • Installation of a new Ubuntu version needs to be done from the Android side via the Dualboot app

Learn more about upgrading to a new Ubuntu image ›

Android notifications and background execution improvements

The Dualboot Android app now provides notifications for when new Ubuntu images are available, so no more excuses not to be running the latest Ubuntu! In addition, improvements have been added to download and install Ubuntu in the background, while showing progress also using standard Android notifications.

Sideload support

For those cases in which bandwidth is at a premium, the dual boot installer now supports sideload mode. This enables downloading images on a fast network and saving them for later installation: these can be downloaded on a laptop and then transferred via USB to the device. It also opens the door for easily flashing custom images other than the ones downloaded from the official channels.

Learn more about sideload support ›

Custom servers

A nifty feature our heroic community of porters of Ubuntu images to devices not officially supported, and for users of those ports: dual boot now supports setting a custom server to directly install new Ubuntu images from there

Learn more about using a custom server ›

Installing dual boot

Installing and running dual boot can be done in a few easy steps. In a nutshell, it requires performing a one-off installation of the dual boot app in Android, which will enable you to both install the version of Ubuntu of your choice, and to reboot into Ubuntu.

Install dual boot on your device

Jonathan Riddell: Next Generation Edges Closer

Planet Ubuntu - Wed, 2014-05-14 08:10
KDE Project:

Today I released the Plasma Next Beta.

It's the first major user of KDE Frameworks 5 and tidies up the internal and the externals of the Plasma desktop.

At the Kubuntu meeting yesterday we decided not to ship Plasma Next by default in October but to make a secondary ISO for those who want to test it out while putting the Plasma 1 version into maintenance mode - updating the version and fixing the major bugs and not much more.

It's going to be an exciting release. But not so exciting it'll implode :)

To get a sneak preview grab the Neon5 ISO which Rohan updated yesterday especially for this beta.

Ubuntu App Developer Blog: Announcing Ubuntu Pioneers

Planet Ubuntu - Tue, 2014-05-13 17:17

Ubuntu has always been about breaking new ground. We broke the ground with the desktop back in 2004, we have broken the ground with cloud orchestration across multiple clouds and providers, and we are building a powerful, innovative mobile and desktop platform that is breaking ground with convergence.

The hardest part about breaking new ground and innovating is not having the vision and creating the technology, it is getting people on board to be part of it.

We knew this was going to be a challenge when we first took the wraps off the Ubuntu app developer platform: we have a brand new platform that was still being developed, and when we started many of the key pieces were not there such as a solid developer portal, documentation, API references, training and more. Today the story is very different with a compelling, end-to-end, developer story for building powerful convergent apps.

We believed and always have believed in the power of this platform, and every single one of those people who also believed in what we are doing and wrote apps have shared the same spirit of pioneering a new platform that we have.

As such, we want to acknowledge those people.

And with this, I present Ubuntu Pioneers.

The idea is simple, we want to celebrate the first 200 app developers who get their apps in Ubuntu. We are doing this in two ways.

Firstly, we have created http://developer.ubuntu.com/pioneers which displays all of these developers and lists the apps that they have created. This will provide a permanent record of those who were there right at the beginning.

Secondly, we have designed a custom, limited-edition Ubuntu Pioneers t-shirt that we want to send to all of our pioneers. For those of you who are listed on this page, please ensure that your email address is correct in MyApps as we will be getting in touch soon.

Thank-you so much to every single person listed on that page. You are an inspiration for me, my team, and the wider Ubuntu project.

If you have that pioneering spirit and wished you were up there, fear not! We still have some space before we hit 200 developers, so go here to get started building an app.

Original by Jono Bacon

Ubuntu Kernel Team: Kernel Team Meeting Minutes – May 13, 2014

Planet Ubuntu - Tue, 2014-05-13 17:14
Meeting Minutes

IRC Log of the meeting.

Meeting minutes.

Agenda

20140513 Meeting Agenda


ARM Status

nothing new to report this week


Release Metrics and Incoming Bugs

Release metrics and incoming bug data can be reviewed at the following link:

http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/reports/kt-meeting.txt


Milestone Targeted Work Items

I have reservations about BP’s being the appropriate method for tracking
work items as we move forward. I’ve tentatively set up a discussion
point for the team sprint at the end of the month to figure out a better
alternative.


Status: Utopic Development Kernel

We are preparing to upload our first v3.15 based kernel to the Utopic
archive. We’re awaiting some DKMS package fixes before doing so. We’ve
currently rebased to the latest v3.15-rc5 upstream kernel.
Additionally, at a minimum, we will converge on the v3.16 kernel for the
Utopic 14.10 release.
—–
Important upcoming dates:
Mon-Wed June 9 – 11, vUDS (~4 weeks away)
Thurs Jun 26 – Alpha 1 (~6 weeks away)


Status: CVE’s

The current CVE status can be reviewed at the following link:

http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/cve/pkg/ALL-linux.html


Status: Stable, Security, and Bugfix Kernel Updates – Trusty/Saucy/Precise/Lucid

Status for the main kernels, until today (May. 6):

  • Lucid – Verification and Testing
  • Precise – Verification and Testing
  • Quantal – Verification and Testing
  • Saucy – Verification and Testing
  • Trusty – Verification and Testing

    Current opened tracking bugs details:

  • http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/reports/kernel-sru-workflow.html

    For SRUs, SRU report is a good source of information:

  • http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/reports/sru-report.html

    Schedule:

    cycle: 27-Apr through 17-May
    ====================================================================
    25-Apr Last day for kernel commits for this cycle
    27-Apr – 03-May Kernel prep week.
    04-May – 10-May Bug verification & Regression testing.
    11-May – 17-May Regression testing & Release to -updates.


Open Discussion or Questions? Raise your hand to be recognized

No open discussions.

Jono Bacon: Announcing Ubuntu Pioneers

Planet Ubuntu - Tue, 2014-05-13 16:24

Ubuntu has always been about breaking new ground. We broke the ground with the desktop back in 2004, we have broken the ground with cloud orchestration across multiple clouds and providers, and we are building a powerful, innovative mobile and desktop platform that is breaking ground with convergence.

The hardest part about breaking new ground and innovating is not having the vision and creating the technology, it is getting people on board to be part of it.

We knew this was going to be a challenge when we first took the wraps off the Ubuntu app developer platform: we have a brand new platform that was still being developed, and when we started many of the key pieces were not there such as a solid developer portal, documentation, API references, training and more. Today the story is very different with a compelling, end-to-end, developer story for building powerful convergent apps.

We believed and always have believed in the power of this platform, and every single one of those people who also believed in what we are doing and wrote apps have shared the same spirit of pioneering a new platform that we have.

As such, we want to acknowledge those people.

And with this, I present Ubuntu Pioneers.

The idea is simple, we want to celebrate the first 200 app developers who get their apps in Ubuntu. We are doing this in two ways.

Firstly, we have created http://developer.ubuntu.com/pioneers which displays all of these developers and lists the apps that they have created. This will provide a permanent record of those who were there right at the beginning.

Secondly, we have designed a custom, limited-edition Ubuntu Pioneers t-shirt that we want to send to all of our pioneers. For those of you who are listed on this page, please ensure that your email address is correct in MyApps as we will be getting in touch soon.

Thank-you so much to every single person listed on that page. You are an inspiration for me, my team, and the wider Ubuntu project.

If you have that pioneering spirit and wished you were up there, fear not! We still have some space before we hit 200 developers, so go here to get started building an app.

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