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Ubuntu GNOME: Planning for Ubuntu GNOME Utopic Unicorn

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 2014-05-08 10:38

Hello everyone,

After a very successful and long 6 months with Trusty Tahr Cycle, here comes another cycle and another 6 months of fun, hard work and more great and successful achievements to accomplish.

As with any start of any cycle, there is a planning phase, then a brainstorming phase and then the implementation phase.

The Planning Phase of Ubuntu GNOME Utopic Unicorn
Blueprints are done and we have the main roadmap for Ubuntu GNOME Utopic Unicorn with 7 blueprints for each Sub-Team and more to come whenever needed.

Ubuntu GNOME Utopic Unicorn Roadmap

  1. Artwork Roadmap
  2. Brainstorming Roadmap
  3. Marketing and Communications Roadmap
  4. Packaging Roadmap
  5. QA Roadmap
  6. Translations Roadmap
  7. Wiki and Documentation Roadmap

Above are the main Blueprints for Ubuntu GNOME Utopic Unicorn Cycle. There is one main roadmap of course which is the umbrella of all the other 7 main blueprints for each sub-team.

More blueprints will be added whenever needed and will be linked to one of the 7 blueprints, depending on the area these new blueprints will be created under. Example: if the new created blueprint will be related to Ubuntu GNOME Slideshow, this will be under Artwork Sub-Team and therefore, will be linked to: Ubuntu GNOME Artwork Roadmap for Utopic Unicorn.

The Brainstorming Phase of Ubuntu GNOME Utopic Unicorn
Ubuntu GNOME Team will start many meetings, one for each Sub-Team, in order to discuss the blueprints. Once these blueprints are discussed and approved, we shall start then the Implementation Phase.

The Implementation Phase of Ubuntu GNOME Utopic Unicorn
This phase obviously will be longest which will start right after the discussion and brainstorming phase. Planning Phase is done. Brainstorming Phase will start very soon right after publishing this post. It might take 1-2 weeks Maximum and then we shall start the Implementation Phase.

Each Sub-Team will have specific tasks to do. Our Team is more than ready to carry on with the great and amazing work we have always showed and we’re looking forward for yet another cycle of fun, team work, achievements and smiles on the faces of Ubuntu GNOME Users.

We promise that we shall never let you down. However, don’t expect to find/see ALL what you have in mind on Ubuntu GNOME 14.10 nothing is perfect as you know.. Yet, from your side, you can play a great role to help and support. That can be easily achieved and done by:

Joining Ubuntu GNOME and Getting Involved.

Thank you!

Ali/amjjawad
Head of Brainstorming and One of Ubuntu GNOME Leaders

Duncan McGreggor: LFE Design Summit

Planet Ubuntu - Wed, 2014-05-07 20:36
Well, maybe not summit, but certainly a meeting of minds :-)

The LFE Community is pleased to announce that we will be holding our first ever community design meeting in Stockholm, Sweden this June during the Erlang User Conference! We have set aside 1 hour for a kick-off discussion that we can continue in breakout sessions, hallways, meadhalls, in #erlang-lisp on Freenode, and on the LFE mail list

Our goals are to not only share plans, but to discover what you want in LFE, how you want to use it. This is an opportunity for us to work together, explore interesting problems to solve, build community awareness around language goals, and identify efforts around which each of us are interested in collaborating with others in the course of subsequent months.

We've opened up a Google Docs form so you can add your ideas for session topics. Here are some discussion topics that we've come up with so far:
  • LFE Standard Library 
  • Java Interop via Erjang 
  • State of LFE/LFE Roadmap 
  • Specs, Types, Debug Info and Dialyzer: Erlang Core AST in BEAM 
  • Refining LFE docs and guides, creating a CookBook, etc.
Add your favorites!
In the next couple weeks, we'll identify the top session topics the folks have proposed and attempt to cover these during the Erlang User Conference. Robert was able to get us some meeting space & time for this; he's hoping to have something viewable on the EUC site soon.
This is a fist step; let's see how this goes, and if people really enjoy it, we can have a real summit next time!


Daniel Pocock: A URI prefix for radio callsigns

Planet Ubuntu - Wed, 2014-05-07 20:16

I've had my amateur callsign far longer than I've had my email address or provider-indepent IP ranges.

While working with the tel: URI recently, I started thinking it would be useful to have a similar URI scheme for radio callsigns. After all, callsigns follow a well documented and globally unique pattern. Amateur operators are often mixing computing technology with radio. This could be a useful foundation for bigger things.

One possibility is in SIP. SIP already has the possibility to route messages using URIs other than sip:. For example, a SIP message can have a tel: URI in the request line. It could be equally feasible to do this for radio callsigns, especially for amateur radio.

Another possibility is placing call signs in HTML. Imagine if you could click M0GLR and some browser plugin looks up a directory to find out which frequencies or repeaters I've used recently.

From URI to URL

A URI typically identifies a resource. A URL helps locate the resource.

In radio, a URL would probably not be very similar to a HTTP scheme URL. A full URL for a radio contact might specify not just the callsign but also the desired frequency and transmission mode.

Instead of a directory path, it is likely you would need things like these as a bare minimum:

  • transmit frequency
  • receive frequence (or offset) if using a duplex mode
  • modulation (FM, SSB, etc)
  • bandwidth
  • mode: morse code, voice, video, packet data, etc

For a fixed station, especially a repeater, it may also be useful to encode the geographic location. For a station in orbit, however, it may be necessary to provide a completely different set of parameters describing the orbit or a pointer to where to find fresh parameters.

Please share your feedback

The idea is now actively under discussion on the IETF URI-review mailing list.

Kees Cook: Linux Security Summit 2014

Planet Ubuntu - Wed, 2014-05-07 18:31

The Linux Security Summit is happening in Chicago August 18th and 19th, just before LinuxCon. Send us some presentation and topic proposals, and join the conversation with other like-minded people. :)

I’d love to see what people have been working on, and what they’d like to work on. Our general topics will hopefully include:

  • System hardening
  • Access control
  • Cryptography
  • Integrity control
  • Hardware security
  • Networking
  • Storage
  • Virtualization
  • Desktop
  • Tools
  • Management
  • Case studies
  • Emerging technologies, threats & techniques

The Call For Participation closes June 6th, so you’ve got about a month, but earlier is better.

© 2014, Kees Cook. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License.

Marcin Juszkiewicz: 10 years ago I got write access to OpenEmbedded

Planet Ubuntu - Wed, 2014-05-07 11:53

It was 8th May of 2004 when I did first push to OpenEmbedded repository. It was BitKeeper at that time but if someone wants to look then commit can be seen in git.

I will not write about my OE history as there are several posts about it on my blog already:

It was nice to be there through all those years to see how it grows. From a tool used by bunch of open source lovers who wanted to build stuff for own toys/devices, to a tool used by more and more companies. First ones like OpenedHand, Vernier. Then SoC vendors started to appear: Atmel, Texas Instruments and more. New architectures were added. New rewrites, updates (tons of those).

Speaking of updates… According to statistics from Ohloh.net I am still in top 5 contributors in OpenEmbedded and Yocto project ;)

There were commercial devices on a market with OpenEmbedded derived distributions running on them. I wonder how many Palm Pre users knew that they can build extra packages with OE. And that work was not lost — LG Electronics uses WebOS on their current TV sets and switched whole development team to use OpenEmbedded.

Since 2006 we got annual meetings and this year we have two of them: European as usual and North America one for first time (there was one few years ago during ELC but I do not remember was it official).

There is OpenEmbedded e.V. which is non-profit organization to take care of OE finances and infrastructure. I was one step from being one of its founders but birth of my daughter was more important ;)

And of course there is the Yocto project. Born from OpenedHand’s Poky helped to bring order into OpenEmbedded. Layers (which were discussed since 2006 at least) were created and enforced so recipes are better organized than it was before. It also helped with visibility. Note that when I write OpenEmbedded I mean OpenEmbedded and Yocto project as they are connected.

I remember days when Montavista was seen as kind of competitor (“kind of” because they were big and expensive while we were just a bunch of guys). Then they moved to OpenEmbedded and dropped own tools. Other company with such switch was Denx. 3 years ago they released ELDK 5.0 which was OE based and made several releases since then.

What future will bring? No idea but it will be bright. And I will still be somewhere nearby.

All rights reserved © Marcin Juszkiewicz
10 years ago I got write access to OpenEmbedded was originally posted on Marcin Juszkiewicz website

Related posts:

  1. 3 years of OpenEmbedded and me
  2. It is 10 years of Linux on ARM for me
  3. OpenEmbedded again

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