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Jono Bacon: I Am Hiring

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 2014-04-03 16:53

I just wanted to let you folks know that I am recruiting for a community manager to join my team at Canonical.

I am looking for someone with strong technical knowledge of building Ubuntu (knowledge of how we release, how we build packages, bug management, governance etc), great community management skills, and someone who is willing to be challenged and grow in their skills and capabilities.

My goal with everyone who joins my team is not just to help them be successful in their work, but to help them be the very best at what they do in our industry. As such I am looking for someone with a passion to be successful and grow.

I think it is a great opportunity and to be part of a great team. Details of the job are available here – please apply if you are interested!?

Ubuntu App Developer Blog: Improvements to the App submission process

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 2014-04-03 15:30

We’ve recently rolled out some changes to the submission process for Click Applications that should make it easier for you to submit new applications, and allow them to be approved more quickly.

Previously when submitting an application you would have to enter all the information about that application on the website, even when some of that information was already included in the package itself. This was firstly an irritation, but sometimes developers would make a mistake when re-entering this information, meaning that the app was rejected from review and they would have to go back and correct the mistake.

With the new changes, when you submit an application you will wait a few seconds while the package is examined by the system, and you will then be redirected to the same process as before. However this time some of the fields will be pre-filled with information from the package. You won’t have to type in the application name, as it will already be there. This will speed up the process, and should reduce the number of mistakes that happen at that stage.

We’ve also been working on a command-line interface for submitting applications. It’s not polished yet, but if you are intrepid you can try out click-toolbelt.

Daniel Pocock: LogAnalyzer and rsyslog MongoDB support now in wheezy-backports

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 2014-04-03 15:12

LogAnalyzer is a powerful but simple log file analysis tool. The upstream web site gives an online demo.

It is developed in PHP, runs in Apache and has no other dependencies such as databases - it can read directly from the log files.

For efficiency, however, it is now trivial to make it work with MongoDB on Debian.

Using a database (including MongoDB and SQL backends) also means that severity codes (debug/info/notice/warn/error/...) are retained. These are not available from many log files. The UI can only colour-code and filter the messages by severity if it has a database backend.

Package status

The packages just entered Debian recently. It has now been migrated to wheezy-backports so anybody on wheezy can use it.

Quick start with MongoDB

The version of rsyslog in Debian wheezy does not support MongoDB output. It is necessary to grab 7.4.8 from backports.

Some versions, up to 7.4.4 in backports, had bugs with MongoDB support - if you tried those, please try again now.

The backported rsyslog is a drop-in replacement for the standard rsyslog package and for users with a default configuration it is unlikely you will notice any difference. For users who customized the configuration, as always, make a backup before trying the new version.

  • Install all the necessary packages: apt-get install rsyslog-mongodb php5-mongo mongodb-server
  • Add the following to /etc/rsyslog.conf:

    module (load="ommongodb")
    *.* action(type="ommongodb" server="127.0.0.1")

  • Look for the MongoDB settings in /etc/loganalyzer/config.php and uncomment them. Comment out the stuff for disk log access.
  • Restart rsyslog and then browse your logs at http://localhost/loganalyzer

Ubuntu App Developer Blog: Submitting your app for the App Showdown

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 2014-04-03 14:00

The app showdown is still in full swing and we have seen lots and lots of activity already. The competition is going to end on Wednesday, April 9th 2014 (23:59 UTC). So what do you need to do to enter and submit the app?

It’s actually quite easy. It takes three steps.

Submit your app

This is obviously the most important bit and needs to happen first. Don’t leave this to the last minute. Your app might have to go through a couple of reviews before it’s accepted in the store. So plan in some time for that. Once it’s accepted and published in the store, you can always, much more quickly, publish an update.

Submit your app.

Register your participation

Once your app is in the store, you need to register your participation in the App Showdown. To make sure your application is registered for the contest and judges review it, you’ll need to fill in the participation form. You can start filling it in already and until the submission deadline, it should only take you 2 minutes to complete.

Fill out the submission form.

 

Questions?

If you have questions or need help, reach out (also rather sooner than later) to our great community of Ubuntu App Developers.

Ubuntu LoCo Council: Want to get your DVD Pack first? Pre-order now!

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 2014-04-03 13:44

We have just received news from Canonical that all verified LoCo Teams contacts who have pre-ordered a 14.04 DVD pack will receive it from the first shipment. This will only apply for those who register until April 8th, 2014. So, if you are the contact for a verified team and have not pre-ordered your DVDs for 14.04, make sure you do it as soon as possible!

If you are not a verified team, please l apply for the process in order to get a pack for the cycle.

Remember, only team contacts from verified teams can request them!

Make sure to get your orders in before the 8th!

Adolfo Jayme Barrientos: Let’s fight for document freedom together!

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 2014-04-03 13:21


Since its inception, the LibreOffice project has been pursuing the objective of freeing office computing from vendor lock-in. Now, some fellow Document Foundation members and LibreOffice developers have announced an umbrella project for all the file parsing libraries that are being developed to achieve this objective.

The new project is called Document Liberation, and will house the wide range of libraries that are already allowing LibreOffice users to have control on their own files. We want everyone to, for example, take their old files written in proprietary formats and have a way to recover the information, convert it over to a standard-compliant, modern format, and ensure the long-term preservation of the information they own – because you should own your data, not a specific version of a program.

Are you interested on this? Let’s make it happen! Head over the new Document Liberation website and read all about this effort.

Gerfried Fuchs: 2CELLOS

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 2014-04-03 10:08

A good friend just yesterday sent me a link to a one and a half hour lasting live concert of 2CELLOS. And wow, I was deeply impressed. Terrific! Even Sir Elton John approves. Have to share them with you, too. :)

Enjoy!

P.S.: I sooo love them also for their pun in their second album title, In2ition. :D

/music | permanent link | Comments: 0 |

Ubuntu GNOME: Canonical is Shutting Down Ubuntu One File Services

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 2014-04-03 09:35

Hi,

“No, unfortunately it’s not an April Fools joke.”

Said Jane Silber from Canonical.

Sad but true. Canonical is shutting down Ubuntu One file services.

“Today we are announcing plans to shut down the Ubuntu One file services. This is a tough decision, particularly when our users rely so heavily on the functionality that Ubuntu One provides. However, like any company, we want to focus our efforts on our most important strategic initiatives and ensure we are not spread too thin.”

However, the shutting down will not be over night but Ubuntu One will no longer be available on Ubuntu and its official variants.

“As of today, it will no longer be possible to purchase storage or music from the Ubuntu One store. The Ubuntu One file services will not be included in the upcoming Ubuntu 14.04 LTS release, and the Ubuntu One apps in older versions of Ubuntu and in the Ubuntu, Google, and Apple stores will be updated appropriately. The current services will be unavailable from 1 June 2014; user content will remain available for download until 31 July, at which time it will be deleted.”

This decision, as per Canonical, will not affect:

“The shutdown will not affect the Ubuntu One single sign on service, the Ubuntu One payment service, or the backend U1DB database service.”

For Full Details, please refer to this post.

Thank you!

Jono Bacon: Ubuntu Online Summit Dates

Planet Ubuntu - Wed, 2014-04-02 23:03

At the last Ubuntu Developer Summit we discussed the idea of making our regular online summit serve more than just developers. We are interested in showcasing not just the developer-orientated discussion sessions that we currently have, but also including content such as presentations, demos, tutorials, and other topics.

I just wanted to give everyone a heads up that the first Ubuntu Online Summit will happen from 10th – 12th June 2014. The website is not yet updated (we are going to keep everything on summit.ubuntu.com and uds.ubuntu.com can point there, and Michael is making the changes to bring over the static content).

We are really keen to get ideas for how the event can run so I am scheduling a hangout on Thurs 10th April at 5pm UTC on Ubuntu On Air where I would welcome ideas and input. I hope to see you there!

Lubuntu Blog: Ubuntu One shutting down

Planet Ubuntu - Wed, 2014-04-02 21:21
Ubuntu One is about to close. Canonical can't continue offering this service anymore. This is really annoying to all of us, who trusted in their (excellent, by the way) service, the high transfer ratio and the space. But for this blog this can be awful, because all the links in this site are pointing to files hosted in this service, and now I have to migrate all of them. I'd like to apologize

Ubuntu Kernel Team: Kernel Team Meeting Minutes – April 01, 2014

Planet Ubuntu - Wed, 2014-04-02 20:15
Meeting Minutes

IRC Log of the meeting.

Meeting minutes.

Agenda

20140402 Meeting Agenda


ARM Status

Nothing new to report this week


Release Metrics and Incoming Bugs

Release metrics and incoming bug data can be reviewed at the following link:

http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/reports/kt-meeting.txt


Milestone Targeted Work Items    apw    core-1311-kernel    4 work items          core-1311-cross-compilation    2 work items          core-1311-hwe-plans    1 work item       ogasawara    core-1311-kernel    1 work item          core-1403-hwe-stack-eol-notifications    2 work items       smb    servercloud-1311-openstack-virt    3 work items   


Status: Trusty Development Kernel

The 3.13.0-21.43 Trusty kernel has been uploaded to the archive. With
kernel freeze about to go into effect this Thurs Apr 3, I do not
anticipate another upload between now and then. After kernel freeze,
all patches are subject to our Ubuntu SRU policy and only critical bug
fixes will warrant an upload before release.
—–
Important upcoming dates:
Thurs Apr 03 – Kernel Freeze (~2 days away)
Thurs Apr 17 – Ubuntu 14.04 Final Release (~2 weeks away)


Status: CVE’s

The current CVE status can be reviewed at the following link:

http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/cve/pkg/ALL-linux.html


Status: Stable, Security, and Bugfix Kernel Updates -

Saucy/Raring/Quantal/Precise/Lucid (bjf/henrix/kamal)
Status for the main kernels, until today (Mar. 25):

  • Lucid – Prep week
  • Precise – Prep week
  • Quantal – Prep week
  • Saucy – Prep week

    Current opened tracking bugs details:

  • http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/reports/kernel-sru-workflow.html

    For SRUs, SRU report is a good source of information:

  • http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/reports/sru-report.html

    Schedule:

    cycle: 30-Mar through 26-Apr
    ====================================================================
    28-Mar Last day for kernel commits for this cycle
    30-Mar – 05-Apr Kernel prep week.
    06-Apr – 12-Apr Bug verification & Regression testing.
    17-Apr 14.04 Released
    13-Apr – 26-Apr Regression testing & Release to -updates.


Open Discussion or Questions? Raise your hand to be recognized

No open discussions.

Duncan McGreggor: Hash Maps in LFE: Request for Comment

Planet Ubuntu - Wed, 2014-04-02 17:33
As you may have heard, hash maps are coming to Erlang in R17. We're all pretty excited about this. The LFE community (yes, we have one... hey, being headquartered on Gutland keeps us lean!) has been abuzz with excitement: do we get some new syntax for Erlang maps? Or just record-like macros?

That's still an open question. There's a good chance that if we find an elegant solution, we'll get some new syntax.

In an effort to (re)start this conversation and get us thinking about the possibilities, I've drawn together some examples from various Lisps. At the end of the post, we'll review some related data structures in LFE... as a point of contrast and possible guidance.

Note that I've tried to keep the code grouped in larger gists, not split up with prose wedged between them. This should make it easier to compare and contrast whole examples at a glance.

Before we dive into the Lisps, let's take a look at maps in Erlang:

Erlang Maps

Common Lisp Hash Tables

Racket Hash Tables

Clojure Hash Maps

Shen Property Lists

OpenLisp Hash Tables

LFE Property Lists

LFE orddicts

I summarized some very basic usability and aesthetic thoughts on the LFE mail list, but I'll restate them here:
  • Erlang syntax really is quite powerful; I continue to be impressed.
  • Clojure was by far the most enjoyable to work with... however, doing something similar in LFE would require quite a bit of additions for language or macro infrastructure. My concern here is that we'd end up with a Clojure clone rather than something distinctly Erlang-Lispy.
  • Racket had the fullest and most useful set of hash functions (and best docs).
  • Chicken Scheme was probably second.
  • Common Lisp was probably (I hate to say it) the most awkward of the bunch). I'm hoping we can avoid pretty much everything the way it was done there :-/
One of the things that makes Clojure such a joy to work with is the unified aspect of core functions and how one uses these to manipulate data structures of different types. Most other implementations have functions/macros that are dedicated to working with just maps. While that's clean and definitely has a strong appeal, Clojure reflects a great deal of elegance.

That being said, I don't think today is the day to propose unifying features for LFE/Erlang data types ;-) (To be honest, though, it's certainly in the back of my mind... this is probably also true for many folks on the mail list.)

Given my positive experience with maps (hash tables) in Racket, and Robert's initial proposed functions like map-new, map-set, I'd encourage us to look to Racket for some inspiration:
Additional thoughts:
  • "map" has a specific meaning in FPs (: lists map), and there's a little bit of cognitive dissonance for me when I look at map-*
  • In my experience, applications generally don't have too many records; however, I've known apps with 100s and 1000s of instances of hash maps; as such, the idea of creating macros for each hash-map (e.g., my-map-get, my-map-set, ...) terrifies me a little. I don't believe this has been proposed, and I don't know enough about LFE's internals (much less, Erlang's) to be able to discuss this with any certainty.
  • The thought did occur that we could put all the map functions in a module e.g., (: maps new ... ), etc. I haven't actually looked at the Erlang source and don't know how maps are implemented in R17 yet (nor how that functionality is presented to the developer). Obviously, once I have, this point will be more clear for me.
With this done, I then did a thought experiment in potential syntax additions for LFE. Below are the series of gists that demonstrate this.

Looking at this Erlang syntax:

My fingers want to do something like this in LFE:

That feels pretty natural, from the LFE perspective. However, it looks like it might require hacking on the tuple-parsing logic (or splitting that into two code paths: one for regular tuple-parsing, and the other for maps...?).

The above syntax also lends itself nicely to these:

The question that arises for me is "how would we do this when calling functions?" Perhaps one of these:

Then, for Joe's other example:

We'd have this for LFE:

Before we pattern match on this, let's look at Erlang pattern matching for tuples:

Compare this with pattern matching elements of a tuple in LFE:

With that in our minds, we turn to Joe's matching example against a specific map element:

And we could do the same in LFE like this:

I'm really uncertain about add-pair and update-pair, both the need for them and the names. Interested to hear from others who know how map is implemented in Erlang and the best way to work with that in LFE...

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