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Jonathan Riddell: Akademy Day 0 Photo Blog

Planet Ubuntu - Fri, 2014-09-05 22:15
KDE Project:


Welcome to Czech, it has beautiful sunsets


Welcome to Akademy at the Brno University of Technology


Gladhorn whips the KDE board candidates into shape


Red Hat shows us their new office building as they serve us beer


KDE for Yes

Javier L.: Remote Sysadmin Available

Planet Ubuntu - Fri, 2014-09-05 15:20

Since today I’m looking actively for a job, if you require a packager or a linux system administrator consider the following entry:

Name: Javier López

Location: South America and constantly moving

Remote: Yes

Willing to relocate: No

Technologies: elastix, nagios, snmp, smokeping, proxmox, vagrant, shell, python scripting, logstash, software packaging (deb,rpm).

Resume: http://javier.io/cv/en

Contact: echo m+javier-io | tr ‘+-‘ ‘@.’

Github: https://github.com/chilicuil

LP: https://launchpad.net/~chilicuil

Culture and people matter the most to me. I prefer unix geeks, vim users, open source fanatics, logical thinkers and tool tinkerers. I think I can help most in a DevOps/Sysadmin position.


Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S07E23 – The One with the Nap Partners

Planet Ubuntu - Fri, 2014-09-05 00:22

Laura Cowen, Alan Pope, and Mark Johnson are in Studio L for Season Seven, Episode Twenty-Three of the Ubuntu Podcast!

 Download OGG  Download MP3 Play in Popup

In this week’s show:-

We’ll be back next week, when we’ll be discussing whether communities suck, and we’ll go through your feedback.

Please send your comments and suggestions to: podcast@ubuntu-uk.org
Join us on IRC in #uupc on Freenode
Leave a voicemail via phone: +44 (0) 203 298 1600, sip: podcast@sip.ubuntu-uk.org and skype: ubuntuukpodcast
Follow us on Twitter
Find our Facebook Fan Page
Follow us on Google+

Zygmunt Krynicki: PEX, distribute your standalone python executables

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 2014-09-04 17:20
I just discovered PEX. It's pretty simple conceptually. Bundle all your python 2/3 modules in a ZIP file. Add a __main__.py inside with bootstrap magic and set the interpreter to #!/usr/bin/env python* and you're done. That's what PEX does for you, with a few extra bells and whistles.

So I did this:

$ pex -r 'plainbox' -r 'xlsxwriter' -r 'lxml' \
  -e plainbox.public:main -o plainbox

And it worked :-) It's super simple and quite convenient for many things I can think of. If you want to play around with the python3 version you may want to apply this patch (python3 is still a stranger to many developers :P)

You can also download the resulting PlainBox executable

Nicholas Skaggs: Autopilot Test Runners

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 2014-09-04 14:35
In my last next post, I discussed will discuss notable autopilot features and talk about how autopilot has matured since it became an independent project.

In the meantime I would be remiss if I didn't also talk about the different test runners commonly used with autopilot tests. In addition to the autopilot binary which can be executed to run the tests, different tools have cropped up to make running tests easier.

autopilot-sandbox-run
This tool ships with autopilot itself and was developed as a way to run autopilot test suites on your desktop in a sane manner. Run the autopilot3-sandbox-run command with --help to see all the options available. By default, the tests will run in an Xvfb server, all completely behind the scenes with the results being reported to you upon completion. This is a great way to run tests with no interference on your desktop. If you are a visual person like me, you may instead wish to pass -X to enable the test runs to occur in a Xephyr window allowing you to see what's happening, but still retaining control of your mouse and keyboard.

I need this tool!
sudo apt-get install python3-autopilot

I want to run tests on my desktop without losing control of my mouse!
autopilot3-sandbox-run my_testsuite_name

I want to run tests on my desktop without losing control of my mouse, but I still want to see what's happening!
autopilot3-sandbox-run -X my_testsuite_name

Autopkgtest
Autopkgtest was developed as a means to automatically test Debian packages, "as-installed". Recently support was added to also test click packages and to run on phablet devices. Autopkgtest will take care of dependencies, setting up autopilot, and unlocking the device. You can literally plug in a device and wait for the results. You should really checkout the README pages, including those on running tests. That said, here's a quick primer on running tests using autopkgtest.

I need this tool!
sudo apt-get install autopkgtest
If you are on trusty, grab and install the utopic deb from here.

I want to run tests for a click package installed on my device!
Awesome. This one is simple. Connect the device and then run:
adt-run --click my.click.name --- ssh -s adb

For example,
adt-run --click com.ubuntu.music --- ssh -s adb

will run the tests for the installed version of the music app on your device. You don't need to do anything else. For the curious, this works by reading the manifest file all click packages have. Read more here.

I want to run the tests I wrote/modified against an installed click package!
For this you need to also pass your local folder containing the tests. You will also want to make sure you installed the new version of the click package if needed.

adt-run my-folder/ --click my.click.name --- ssh -s adb

Autopkgtest can also run in a lxc container, QEMU, a chroot, and other fun targets. In the examples above, I passed --- ssh -s adb as the target, instructing autopkgtest to use ssh and adb and thus run the tests on a connected phablet device. If you want to run autopilot tests on a phablet device, I recommend using autopkgtest as it handles everything for you.

phablet-test-run
This tool is part of the greater phablet-tools package. It was originally developed as an easy way to execute tests on your phablet device. Note however that copying the tests and any dependencies to the phablet device is left to you. The phablet-tools package provides some other useful utilities to help you with this (checkout phablet-click-test-setup for example).

I need this tool!
sudo apt-get install phablet-tools

I want to run the tests I wrote/modified against an installed click package!
First copy the tests to the device. You can use the ubuntu sdk or click-buddy for this, or even do it manually via adb. Then run phablet-test-run. It takes the same arguments as autopilot itself.

phablet-test-run -v my_testsuite

Note the tools looks for the testsuite and any dependencies of the testsuite inside the /home/phablet/autopilot folder. It's up to you to make sure everything that is needed to run your tests are located there or else it will fail.

other ways
There are of course other possible test runners that wrap around autopilot to make executing tests easier. Perhaps you've written a script yourself. Just remember at the end of the day the autopilot binary will be running the tests. It simply needs to be able to find the testsuite and all of it's dependencies in order to run. For this reason, don't be afraid to execute autopilot3 and run the tests yourself. Happy test runs!

Raphaël Hertzog: The problem of distributing applications

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 2014-09-04 08:29

A few days ago I watched a Q/A session with Linus Torvalds at Debconf 14. One of the main complaint of Linus towards Linux distribution was the way that distribution ends up using different versions of libraries than what has been used during application development. And the fact that it’s next to impossible to support properly all Linux distributions at the same time due to this kind of differences.


And now I just discovered a new proposal of the systemd team that basically tries to address this: Revisiting how we put together Linux Systems.

They suggest to make extensive use of btrfs subvolumes to host multiple variants of the /usr tree (that is supposed to contain all the invariant system code/data) that you could combine with multiple runtime/framework subvolumes thanks to filesytem namespaces and make available to individual applications.

This way of grouping libraries in “runtime subvolumes” reminds me a bit of the concepts of baserock (they are using git instead of btrfs) and while I was a bit dubious of all this (because it goes against quite a few of the principles of distribution integration) I’m beginning to believe that there’s room for both models to work together.

It would be nice if Debian could become the reference distribution that upstream developers are using to develop against Linux. This would in turn mean that when upstream distribution their application under this new form, they will provide (or reference) Debian-based subvolumes ready for use by users (even those who are not using Debian as their main OS). And those subvolumes would be managed by the Debian project (probably automatically built from our collection of .deb).

We’re still quite far from this goal but it will interesting to see this idea mature and become reality. There are plenty of challenges facing us.

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Benjamin Kerensa: One Year of Release Management

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 2014-09-04 05:16
This month marks my one year anniversary contributing to the Release Management Team as a Early Feedback Community Release Manager and I was not sure how the experience would turn out at first. I have really enjoyed the last 12 months working on our Firefox Nightly release. At our last work week in Portland, one […]

Stephen Michael Kellat: An ALL-CALL

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 2014-09-04 00:00

The following message was sent as an ALL-CALL to all members of Ubuntu Ohio regardless of their subscription status to the team's Launchpad-based mailing list.

This is an all-call to Ubuntu Ohio.

For the purposes of Ubuntu Global Jam I would like to schedule regional keysignings. Setting up an all-state single gathering is not looking doable at this time. With our not participating in Ohio Linux Fest this year setting things up regionally would seem appropriate.

For those living in any of the following counties I want to set up an event in perhaps Kirtland, Kent, or somewhere in Geagua County: Lorain, Cuyahoga, Medina, Summit, Portage, Trumbull, Geagua, Lake, Ashtabula, Wayne, Stark, and Mahoning. It will be ideal if anybody in the community with proper connections can get us space to meet in on Kent State University's Kent Campus. Relative to Kirtland as a meeting point, I can either contact Kirtland Public Library or talk to Lakeland Community College to get space. As to Geauga County for a meeting point I will be open for suggestions.

No, we will not attempt to go for an inconvenient location such as The Lodge at Geneva State Park in Ashtabula County for the group of counties listed above.

For other portions of the state, I am open to ideas for organization as to where you would like to get together and how wide a net you would like to cast. Please contribute those on the community's mailing list at ubuntu-us-ohio@lists.launchpad.net

If you are interested in participating in this face-to-face event you need to express interest on the mailing list and indicate both what county you live in and your preferred date to get together. We need expressions of interest by NO LATER THAN 10 PM local time on Friday night. Ubuntu Global Jam runs September 12th-14th and Monday will be a day to scramble to get meeting places set up. Instructions on what to bring for the keysigning would be provided by Tuesday night so as to prepare if enough interest is expressed.

For the purposes of this all-call, "enough interest" is going to be defined as a minimum of 3 people other than the person heading up the keysigning session commiting on-list to attend.

If there any questions, please contact the Ohio leadership team by way of this contact form: https://launchpad.net/~ubuntu-us-ohio-council/+contactuser

Thank you for your time and patience.

Stephen Michael Kellat
Leader/Point of Contact, Ubuntu Ohio

Dustin Kirkland: OpenStack Austin Meetup, with an Orange Box and Home Brew Beer!

Planet Ubuntu - Wed, 2014-09-03 15:59


In case you missed the recent Cloud Austin MeetUp, you have another chance to see the Ubuntu Orange Box live and in action here in Austin!

This time, we're at the OpenStack Austin MeetUp, next Wednesday, September 10, 2014, at 6:30pm at Tech Ranch Austin, 9111 Jollyville Rd #100, Austin, TX!

If you join us, you'll witness all of OpenStack Ice House, deployed in minutes to real hardware. Not an all-in-one DevStack; not a minimum viable set of components.  Real, rich, production-quality OpenStack!  Ceilometer, Ceph, Cinder, Glance, Heat, Horizon, Keystone, MongoDB, MySQL, Nova, NTP, Quantum, and RabbitMQ -- intelligently orchestrated and rapidly scaled across 10 physical servers sitting right up front on the podium.  Of course, we'll go under the hood and look at how all of this comes together on the fabulous Ubuntu Orange Box.
And like any good open source software developer, I generally like to make things myself, and share them with others.  In that spirit, I'll also bring a couple of growlers of my own home brewed beer, Ubrewtu ;-)  Free as in beer, of course!Cheers,Dustin

Daniel Holbach: ubuntu-community-team list: Hang out, discuss new ideas

Planet Ubuntu - Wed, 2014-09-03 13:50

We just created a new Ubuntu mailing list called ubuntu-community-team.

As we didn’t have a place like this before, we created it so we can

  • have discussions around planning community events
  • start all kinds of initiatives around Ubuntu
  • allow enthusiasts of the Ubuntu community to kick around new ideas
  • bring people from all parts of our community together so we can learn from each other
  • hang out and have fun

We are looking forward to seeing you on the list as well, sign up on this page.

Jeremy Kerr: Customising OpenPower firmware

Planet Ubuntu - Wed, 2014-09-03 12:58

Now that the OpenPower sources are available, it's possible to build custom firmware images for OpenPower machines. Here's a little guide to show how that's done.

The build process

OpenPower firmware has a number of different components, and some infrastructure to pull it all together. We use buildroot to do most of the heavy lifting, plus a little wrapper, called op-build.

There's a README file, containing build instructions in the op-build git repository, but here's a quick overview:

To build an OpenPower PNOR image from scratch, we'll need a few prerequisites (assuming recent Ubuntu):

sudo apt-get install cscope ctags libz-dev libexpat-dev libc6-dev-i386 \ gcc g++ git bison flex gcc-multilib g++-multilib libxml-simple-perl \ libxml-sax-perl

Then we can grab the op-build repository, along with the git submodules:

git clone --recursive git://github.com/open-power/op-build.git

set up our environment and configure using the "palmetto" machine configuration:

. op-build-env op-build palmetto_defconfig

and build:

op-build

After a while (there is quite a bit of downloading to do on the first build), the build should complete successfully, and you'll have a PNOR image build in output/images/palmetto.pnor.

If you have an existing op-build tree around (colleagues working on OpenPower perhaps?), you can share or copy the dl/ directory to save on download time.

The op-build command is just a shortcut for a make in the buildroot tree, so the general buildroot documentation applies here too. Just replace "make" with "op-build". For example, we can enable a verbose build with:

op-build V=1 Changing the build configuration

Above, we used a palmetto_defconfig as the base buildroot configuration. This defines overall options for the build; things like:

  • Toolchain details used to build the image
  • Which firmware packages are used
  • Which packages are used in the petitboot bootloader environment
  • Which kernel configuration is used for the petitboot bootloader environment

This configuration can be changed through buildroot's menuconfig UI. To adjust the configuration:

op-build menuconfig

And busybox's configuration interface will be shown:

As an example, let's say we want to add the "file" utility to the petitboot environment. To do this, we can nagivate to that option in the Target Packages section (Target Packages → Shell and Utilities → file), and enable the option:

Then exit (saving changes) and rebuild:

op-build

- the resulting image will have the file command present in the petitboot shell environment.

Kernel configuration

There are a few other configuration targets to influence the build process; the most interesting for our case will be the kernel configuration. Since we use petitboot as our bootloader, it requires a Linux kernel for the initial bootloader environment. The set of drivers in this kernel will dictate which devices you'll be able to boot from.

So, if we want to enable booting from a new device, we'll need to include an appropriate driver in the kernel. To adjust the kernel configuration, use the linux-menuconfig target:

op-build linux-menuconfig

- which will show the standard Linux "menuconfig" interface:

From here, you can alter the kernel configuration. Once you're done, save changes and exit. Then, to build the new PNOR image:

op-build Customised packages

If you have a customised version of one of the packages used in the OpenPower build, you can easily tell op-build to use your local package. There are a number of package-specific make variables documented in the buildroot generic package reference, the most interesting ones being the _VERSION and _SITE variables.

For example, let's say we have a custom petitboot tree that we want to use for the build. We've committed our changes in the petitboot tree, and want to build a new PNOR image. For the sake of this example, the git SHA petitboot commit we'd like to build is 2468ace0, and our custom petitboot tree is at /home/jk/devel/petitboot.

To build a new PNOR image with this particular petitboot source, we need to specify a few buildroot make variables:

op-build PETITBOOT_SITE=/home/jk/devel/petitboot \ PETITBOOT_SITE_METHOD=git \ PETITBOOT_VERSION=2468ace0

This is what these variables are doing:

  • PETITBOOT_SITE=/home/jk/devel/petitboot - tells op-build where our custom source tree is. This could be a git URL or a local path.
  • PETITBOOT_SITE_METHOD=git - telsl op-build that PETITBOOT_SITE is a git tree. If we were using a git:// URL for PETITBOOT_SITE, then this variable would be set automatically
  • PETITBOOT_VERSION=2468ace0 - tells op-build which version of petitboot to checkout. This can be any commit reference that git understands.

The same method can be used for any of the other packages used during build. For OpenPower builds, you may also want to use the SKIBOOT_* and LINUX_* variables to include custom skiboot firmware and kernel in the build.

If you'd prefer to test new sources without committing to git, you can use _SITE_METHOD=local. This will copy the source tree (defined by _SITE) to the buildroot tree and use it directly. For example:

op-build SKIBOOT_SITE=/home/jk/devel/skiboot \ SKIBOOT_SITE_METHOD=local

- will build the current (and not-necessarily-committed) sources in /home/jk/devel/skiboot. Note that buildroot has no way to tell if your code has changed with _SITE_METHOD=local. If you re-build with this, it's safer to clean the relevant source tree first:

op-build skiboot-dirclean

John Baer: Daas – Google’s not so secret Weapon

Planet Ubuntu - Tue, 2014-09-02 23:08

When many folks begin discussing the differances between Chromebook OS and Windows or iOS versus

The post Daas – Google’s not so secret Weapon appeared first on john's journal.

Raphaël Hertzog: My Free Software Activities in August 2014

Planet Ubuntu - Tue, 2014-09-02 15:58

This is my monthly summary of my free software related activities. If you’re among the people who made a donation to support my work (65.55 €, thanks everybody!), then you can learn how I spent your money. Otherwise it’s just an interesting status update on my various projects.

Distro Tracker

Even though I was officially in vacation during 3 of the 4 weeks of August, I spent many nights working on Distro Tracker. I’m pleased to have managed to bring back Python 3 compatibility over all the (tested) code base. The full test suite now passes with Python 3.4 and Django 1.6 (or 1.7).

From now on, I’ll run “tox” on all code submitted to make sure that we won’t regress on this point. tox also runs flake8 for me so that I can easily detect when the submitted code doesn’t respect the PEP8 coding style. It also catches other interesting mistakes (like unused variable or too complex functions).

Getting the code to pass flake8 was also a major effort, it resulted in a huge commit (89 files changed, 1763 insertions, 1176 deletions).

Thanks to the extensive test suite, all those refactoring only resulted in two regressions that I fixed rather quickly.

Some statistics: 51 commits over the last month, 41 by me, 3 by Andrew Starr-Bochicchio, 3 by Christophe Siraut, 3 by Joseph Herlant and 1 by Simon Kainz. Thanks to all of them! Their contributions ported some features that were already available on the old PTS. The new PTS is now warning of upcoming auto-removals, is displaying problems with uptream URLs, includes a short package description in the page title, and provides a link to screenshots (if they exist on screenshots.debian.net).

We still have plenty of bugs to handle, so you can help too: check out https://tracker.debian.org/docs/contributing.html. I always leave easy bugs for others to handle, so grab one and get started! I’ll review your patch with pleasure.

Tryton

After my last batch of contributions to Tryton’s French Chart of Accounts (#4108, #4109, #4110, #4111) Cédric Krier granted me commit rights to the account_fr mercurial module.

Debconf 14

I wasn’t able to attend this year but thanks to awesome work of the video team, I watched some videos (and I still have a bunch that I want to see). Some of them were put online the day after they had been recorded. Really amazing work!

Django 1.7

After the initial bug reports, I got some feedback of maintainers who feared that it would be difficult to get their packages working with Django 1.7. I helped them as best as I can by providing some patches (for horizon, for django-restricted-resource, for django-testscenarios).

Since I expected many maintainers to be not very pro-active, I rebuilt all packages with Django 1.7 to detect at least those that would fail to build. I tagged as confirmed all the corresponding bug reports.

Looking at https://bugs.debian.org/cgi-bin/pkgreport.cgi?users=python-django@packages.debian.org;tag=django17, one can see that some progress has been made with 25 packages fixed. Still there are at least 25 others that are still problematic in sid and 35 that have not been investigated at all (except for the automatic rebuild that passed). Again your help is more than welcome!

It’s easy to install python-django 1.7 from experimental and they try to use/rebuild the packages from the above list.

Dpkg translation

With the freeze approaching, I wanted to ensure that dpkg was fully translated in French. I thus pinged debian-l10n-french@lists.debian.org and merged some translations that were done by volunteers. Unfortunately it looks like nobody really stepped up to maintain it in the long run… so I did myself the required update when dpkg 1.17.12 got uploaded.

Is there anyone willing to manage dpkg’s French translation? With the latest changes in 1.17.13, we have again a few untranslated strings:
$ for i in $(find . -name fr.po); do echo $i; msgfmt -c -o /dev/null --statistics $i; done
./po/fr.po
1083 translated messages, 4 fuzzy translations, 1 untranslated message.
./dselect/po/fr.po
268 translated messages, 3 fuzzy translations.
./scripts/po/fr.po
545 translated messages.
./man/po/fr.po
2277 translated messages, 8 fuzzy translations, 3 untranslated messages.

Misc stuff

I made an xsane QA upload (it’s currently orphaned) to drop the (build-)dependency on liblcms1 and avoid getting it removed from Debian testing (see #745524). For the record, how-can-i-help warned me of this after one dist-upgrade.

With the Django 1.7 work and the need to open up an experimental branch, I decided to switch python-django’s packaging to git even though the current team policy is to use subversion. This triggered (once more) the discussion about a possible switch to git and I was pleased to see more enthusiasm this time around. Barry Warsaw tested a few workflows, shared his feeling and pushed toward a live discussion of the switch during Debconf. It looks like it might happen for good this time. I contributed my share in the discussions on the mailing list.

Thanks

See you next month for a new summary of my activities.

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Zygmunt Krynicki: Personal annoyance personified: we need a Serial Manager

Planet Ubuntu - Tue, 2014-09-02 13:25
This is a personal annoyance of mine. Everything involving a serial line is preceded by "sudo stop modemmanager". Given that we're talking about a free desktop things should not have to require that.

I've just noticed and read the "Ubuntu Loves Devs" effort and I think that's something that could be addressed, or at least acknowledged. I've filed a bug report about what could be made to make modems and embedded / specialized development tools be less at odds with each other.

If you're interested in embedded development boards or accessing various devices using serial lines I'd like to invite you to join the discussion.

Canonical Design Team: Come and meet us at dConstruct

Planet Ubuntu - Tue, 2014-09-02 12:44

Ubuntu is sponsoring the dConstruct “Living with the network” event on the 5th of September at the Brighton Dome. Stop by for a chat with the team, grab some goodies and enter our competition for a chance to win an Ubuntu Phone.

Didier Roche: Ubuntu loves Developers

Planet Ubuntu - Tue, 2014-09-02 12:41

Ubuntu is one of the best Linux platforms with an awesome desktop for regular users (and soon phone and tablets and more!) and great servers for system administrators and devops. A number of developers are choosing Ubuntu as their primary development system of choice, even if they develop for platforms other than Ubuntu itself, like doing some Android development, web development and so on.

However, even if we fill the basic needs for this audience, we decided a few months ago to start a development and integration effort to make those users completely feel at home. Ubuntu loves developers and we are going to showcase it by making Ubuntu the best available developer platform!

Sounds great! What's up then?

We decided to start by concentrating on Android developers. We'll ramp up afterwards on other use cases like Go developers, web developers, Dart… but we want to ensure we deliver a stunning experience for each targeted audience before moving on to the next topic.

After analyzing how to setup an Android development machine on Ubuntu we realized that, depending on the system, it can takes up to 9 different steps to get proper IDE integration and all the dependencies installed. The whole goal was to reduce that to one single command!

Concretely speaking, we created the Ubuntu Developer Tools Center, a command line tool which allows you to download the latest version of Android Studio (beta), alongside the latest Android SDK, and all the required dependencies (which will only ask for sudo access if you don't have all the required dependencies installed already), enable multi-arch on your system if you are on a 64 bit machine, integrate it with the Unity launcher…

As said, we focused on Android Studio (based itself on Intellij IDEA) for now as it seems that’s where Google has been focusing its Android tools development effort for over a year. However, the system is not restrictive and it will be relatively trivial in the near future to add ADT support (Android Development Tools using Eclipse)[1].

Indeed, The Ubuntu Developer Tools Center is targeted as being a real platform for all developer users on Ubuntu. We carefully implemented the base platform with a strong technical foundation, so that it's easily extensible and some features like the advanced bash shell completion will even make more sense once we added other development tools support.

Availability

We will always target first the latest Ubuntu LTS version alongside the latest version in development. Yes! It means that people who want to benefit for the extensively tested and strong base experience that a Long Term Support version offers will always be up to date on their favorite developer tools and be first-class citizen. We strongly believe that developers always want the latest available tools on a strong and solid stable base and this is one of the core principle we are focusing on.

For now, the LTS support is through our official Ubuntu Developer Tools Center ppa, but we plan to move that to the backports archive with all the newly or updated libraries. For Utopic, it's already available in the 14.10 Ubuntu archive.

Initial available version

Be aware that the Ubuntu Developer Tools Center is currently in alpha. This tool will evolve depending on your feedback, so it's up to you to suggest the direction you want it to go! A blog post on how to contribute will follow in the next days. This initial version is available in English, French and Chinese!

Another blog post will expand as well how we test this tool. For now, just be aware that the extensive test suite is running daily, and it ensures that on all supported platforms we don't break, that the Ubuntu platform itself doesn't break us, or that any 3rd party on which we rely on (like website links and so on) don't change without us spotting it. This will ensure that our tools is always working, with limited downtime.

Example: how to install Ubuntu Developer tools and then, Android Studio Ubuntu Developer Tools Center

If you are on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, first, add the UDTC ppa:

$ sudo add-apt-repository ppa:didrocks/ubuntu-developer-tools-center $ sudo apt-get update

Then, installing UDTC:

$ sudo apt-get install ubuntu-developer-tools-center

How to install android-studio

Simply executes[2]:

$ udtc android

And then, accept the installation path and Google license. It will download, install all requirements alongside Android Studio and latest android SDK itself, then configure and fit it into the system like by adding an Unity launcher icon…

And that's it! Happy Android application hacking on Ubuntu. You will find the familiar experience with the android emulator and sdk manager + auto-updater to always be on the latest.

Feedback

We welcome any ideas and feedback, as well as contributions as we'll discuss more in the next post. Meanwhile, do not hesitate to reach me on IRC (didrocks on freenode, #ubuntu-desktop as the primary channel to discuss), or on Google+. You can as well open bugs on the launchpad project or github one

I'm excited about this opportunity to work on the developer desktop. Ubuntu loves Developers, and it's all on us to create a strong developer community so that we can really make Ubuntu, the developer-friendly platform of choice!

Notes

[1] For the technical audience, the Android Studio specific part is less than 60 lines

[2] android-studio is the default for the android development platform, you can choose it explicitely by executing "$ udtc android android-studio". Refer to --help or use the bash completion for more help and hints

Jonathan Riddell: Should Scotland be an Independent Country?

Planet Ubuntu - Tue, 2014-09-02 10:21
KDE Project:

Today my postal vote in the referendum for Scottish independence was sent off. I usually use my personal blog for non technical bits but I thought some readers of my KDE Blog might be interested in this as it does affect the geopolitics of pretty much the whole world.

What's going on?

300 years ago Scotland was broke and England was getting rich from its empire so England gave Scotland a wad of money and created the United Kingdom. That served Scotland pretty well for some centuries as Scots were able to trade and move freely across the empire and plenty of Scots were happy to take part in that (my old school still has a load of Hong Kong gold in its attic as a result). Time passed and the empire was shut down, the UK joined the EU and some oil was found in the sea off the coast of Scotland. After many decades of Scottish public services being run by some people appointed by the UK government, 15 years ago a new Scottish pariament was reconvened to control public services and laws in Scotland, but not tax or anything international.

In Scottish politics we have not liked the Conservative (and Unionist or Tory) party since Margaret Thatcher destroyed Scottish industry. Then Labour went out of fashion after Tony Blair started some random wars and Scottish administration (not even wanting to call itself a government) decided to market Scotland by calling it small. Then their coalition partner party the Liberal Democrats fell out of fashion by getting into the UK government and dropping all their liberal principles (GCHQ has been doing mass surveilance on the population and they haven't said a word against it). So at the last election the only large party left that had not lost all respect, the Scottish National Party, was voted in with a majority and their Scottish Government is now organising this referendum.

What will happen if the vote is Yes?

Both sides have said they will respect the result. If over 50% of people vote yes then the Scottish Government will start to negotiate with the UK government on the details to make Scotland an independent country. Depending on your point of view this is either a new country (Scotland) and a continuing state (rest of UK) or dissolving the 300 year old union to make two new countries. The proposed timetable is to make Scotland independent by March 2016 (which is done to fit in with the election timetable of the Scottish parliament, it's made somewhat more complex by a UK election happening in 2015).

Why vote for Yes?

There is a democracy in Scotland which has been notably different from England and the rest of the UK for some time. The two parties that make up the UK government (Conservative and Liberal Democrat) are the two least popular parties in Scotland. Political borders are circles on a map which can be arbitrary or based on some nasty tribal allegance but here's a redrawing which makes government better follow the demos of the population.

Is this anti-English?

We can be proud in Scotland that independence is being done through a peaceful political process. That was not the case in Ireland were they had effectively a guerrilla civil war until recently over incomprehensible tribal allegances. And it's not the case that Scottish nationalism is in any way anti any other nation, Scotland would continue to be best friends with England and the other counties of the British Isles.

The Yes campaign has sensibly avoided any call to patriotism, kilts and Irn Bru tend to get old quickly. By contrast the No campaign has tried quite a lot of patriotism talking about shared ties and gosh remember the first world war wasn't it glorious? Meanwhile English politics is getting more and more little-Englander. The Prime Minister has said he will give a referendum on membership of the EU, he wants to pull the UK out of the Court of Human Rights and he is making immigration much harder, all good reasons to vote to stay away from that sort of politics.

But isn't it better to work together?

Yes, and Scotland has benefited from the union with England to not have barriers of trade or movement. Now we have a larger union, the EU, to sort out the boring stuff around trade and movement we have no need of that middle layer of government. Scottish independence is an efficiency drive.

Can Scotland afford to be independent?

This is a common worry. Scots are often not very confident in their own country. We're small and need the help of something larger is a common thought. Of course it's not true, Scotland is exactly in the middle if you place it in a list of countries by size or population. We have plenty of industry and natural resources. And then we have the largest oil reserves in Europe. Currently the UK spends all the money that comes in from the oil while any other well run country with oil creates a soverign wealth fund, a common argument against independence is that the oil will run out sometime, my argument for independence is we need to be independent toot sweet so we can start a soverign wealth fund before it runs out.

Will Scotland be allowed to join the EU?

There's no precendent for this happening and no rules governing this process. Those against independence say Scotland would need to apply to join the EU and the Spanish might block it to stop the Catalans getting ideas above their station. Those for independence point out that Scotland is already a member of the EU, that all the citizens have EU citizenship and there is no rule to kick us out. In the end politics will decide and the EU has a good record of welcoming in people rather than shunning them.

What Currency will Scotland use?

Ah, yes, slightly more tricky this and the No campaign has been playing it to the full. The Scottish Government wants to continue to use the pound sterling with a formal currency union with the rest of the UK. The current UK government says this would not happen but it's not clear why the rest of the UK gets to keep it and Scotland not, this does suggest the last 300 years of union have really been a sham. The Scottish Government in response points out that as a freely tradeable currency Scotland can use the pound if it wants and nobody can stop it (this is what Ireland did when it became independent and what the Isle of Man and Gibraltar still do) and without a currency union Scotland would have no need to pay the massive national debt the UK has. Personally I'd like to use the Euro but that doesn't seem very fashionable these days for some reason.

What will happen to the BBC.. to the NHS.. won't the terrorists love it.. will Scotland have to join Schengen.. will immigrants steal our jobs and our women... will the UK get to keep its nuclear bombs?

The Scottish Government published a really long book with answers to all these details. They're just starting positions of course, after any Yes vote there will be lots of negotiation to work out how everything will be set up, but there is little that seems insurmountable.

They want to start a Scottish equivalent of the BBC which would mean we would actually get Scottish news in Scotland, currently half the news shown to use is irrelevant. It would make a formal agreement to allow us to keep important stuff like the World Service and Doctor Who. The National Health Service gives us free use of doctors and hospitals and any politician which says anything against it will be voted out quickly, the NHS is separate in Scotland than that in England so there's no change here, although some no campaign adverts have tried to claim otherwise. There has been some nonsense about terrorists loving it and we won't have MI5 and GCHQ to look after us all, to me the mass surveilance of the spy agencies is very much a reason to get away from that. I'd be all for Scotland joining Schengen and having closer ties with Europe but I expect we'll remain part of the British Isles Common Travel Area, it's only sensible politically. Scotland needs more immigrants for various economic reasons but in England there's a large political wish against it, another good reason to vote Yes. The UK nuclear bombs are kept north of Glasgow and sadly this is the only issue that has interested Slashdot. There is no desire to keep these in Scotland and the Scottish Government has promised to get rid of them mucho rapido, what the rest of the UK does with them is a problem for the rest of the UK.

All very exciting..

The vote is on 18th September and the polls show the No campaign stay steady at a bit below 50% and the Yes campaign started low at 30-odd percent but has been gaining ground as undecided voters move to Yes. There's now only a few points separating them and there are still plenty of undecided voters. The trend is for undecideds to move to Yes so it's very much all to play for. It's fun to live in interesting times.

The Fridge: Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 381

Planet Ubuntu - Mon, 2014-09-01 22:14

Tony Yarusso: Propane Grill

Planet Ubuntu - Mon, 2014-09-01 21:29

I'm looking for one that has side shelves (sometimes called a warming shelf in specs), a thermometer, and is on wheels.

  Estimated Cost $200Last updated on 09/01/2014 - 16:29 Big house itemsRequested 1Purchased 0  

Tony Yarusso: The Opposite of Cold: The Northwoods Finnish Sauna Tradition

Planet Ubuntu - Mon, 2014-09-01 21:18

Beginning with the origins of Finnish sauna and how the practice was first brought to North America, and continuing all the way to contemporary design, The Opposite of Cold is an exquisite commemoration of the history, culture, and practice of Finnish sauna in the northwoods. With stunning photographs of unique and historic saunas of the region-including the oldest sauna in North America, incredible surviving saunas from immigrant farmsteads, and the gorgeous contemporary saunas from noted architects-Michael Nordskog and Aaron Hautala unveil the importance and beauty of sauna culture in modern Midwestern life.

  Estimated Cost $18See www.amazon.com/dp/0816656827See www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-opposite-of-cold-m...Last updated on 09/01/2014 - 16:18 Nice to haveRequested 1Purchased 0  

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