news aggregator

Sam Hewitt: Microwave-Irradiated Potato Chips

Planet Ubuntu - Fri, 2014-04-18 20:00
A little radiation goes a long way.

Your microwave can be used for more than reheating coffee.

It is far more versatile a device, for instance, you can make these fat-free potato chips ("crisps" for you British gentlepeople) in one with very little effort.

    Ingredients
  • 1 potato,
  • sea salt, to taste
  • any other seasoning or spice that you'd like to flavour the chips with.
  • Needed Equipment
  • Microwave
  • Useful Equipment
  • a mandoline –brilliant thing to have, even a sub-$20 will do
  • a silicon sheet –for a non-stick surface in the microwave, I recommend the brand "Silpat"
    Directions
  1. Thinly cut the potato into even, 2-3 millimeter slices.
  2. Here, a mandoline is incredibly useful (even perhaps ideal or necessary).
  3. Rinse the excess starch off the potato slices and shake/pat/spin off the excess water.
  4. Place the slices onto a non-stick microwave-safe (no metals!) sheet, without overlap.
  5. Microwave on high power for 2 minutes. This'll remove a lot of the water in the potato and you'll begin to see them browning.
  6. Flip the slices and microwave for another minute. Keep an eye on them while they're in there to prevent burning.
  7. Remove any nicely browned chips.
  8. For any not fully done, zap on high in 10 second intervals until they too are browned.
  9. Season with salt, to your tastes, and/or any other thing really.
  10. Enjoy, guilt-free. :)

Ronnie Tucker: PLUMgrid Virtual Network Infrastructure Achieves Certification for Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform

Planet Ubuntu - Fri, 2014-04-18 19:18

PLUMgrid , the leader in Virtual Network Infrastructure (VNI), today announced that PLUMgrid VNI 3.0 has achieved certification for Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform . The certification ensures that PLUMgrid VNI 3.0 has been integrated, tested and certified for use with Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform.
PLUMgrid VNI 3.0 is a secure virtual networking product for large-scale OpenStack clouds. Built using PLUMgrid Platform and IO Visor™ technology , it provides an easy and simple solution to build cloud infrastructure at scale and offer secure, multi-tenant network services to OpenStack cloud users. Based on a highly automated workflow, PLUMgrid VNI 3.0 enables applications and users to deploy private Virtual Domains™ in seconds without changing the physical network fabric.

Source:

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/plumgrid-virtual-network-infrastructure-achieves-certification-for-red-hat-enterprise-linux-openstack-platform-2014-04-14

Ronnie Tucker: IBM: Now Is The Time For KVM

Planet Ubuntu - Fri, 2014-04-18 19:17

IBM says that now is great time for KVM (Kernel-based Virtual Machine) technology as a result of key contributions from its large developer community.
The KVM hypervisor is an open source virtualization technology and, increasingly, it is becoming an important tool in any Linux user’s handbook, especially in light of OpenStack.
KVM is a full virtualization solution for Linux on x86 hardware containing virtualization extensions (Intel VT or AMD-V) and consisting of a loadable kernel module (kvm.ko) that provides the core virtualization infrastructure and a processor-specific module (kvm-intel.ko) or (kvm-amd.ko).
IBM says that hypervisors have had to better manage compute, network, and storage resources — and that this need that has been fulfilled by KVM.

Source:

http://www.drdobbs.com/open-source/ibm-now-is-the-time-for-kvm/240167057

Dustin Kirkland: Docker in Ubuntu, Ubuntu in Docker

Planet Ubuntu - Fri, 2014-04-18 19:11




This article is cross-posted on Docker's blog as well.
There is a design pattern, occasionally found in nature, when some of the most elegant and impressive solutions often seem so intuitive, in retrospect.


For me, Docker is just that sort of game changing, hyper-innovative technology, that, at its core,  somehow seems straightforward, beautiful, and obvious.



Linux containers, repositories of popular base images, snapshots using modern copy-on-write filesystem features.  Brilliant, yet so simple.  Docker.io for the win!


I clearly recall nine long months ago, intrigued by a fervor of HackerNews excitement pulsing around a nascent Docker technology.  I followed a set of instructions on a very well designed and tastefully manicured web page, in order to launch my first Docker container.  Something like: start with Ubuntu 13.04, downgrade the kernel, reboot, add an out-of-band package repository, install an oddly named package, import some images, perhaps debug or ignore some errors, and then launch.  In few moments, I could clearly see the beginnings of a brave new world of lightning fast, cleanly managed, incrementally saved, highly dense, operating system containers.

Ubuntu inside of Ubuntu, Inception style.  So.  Much.  Potential.


Fast forward to today -- April 18, 2014 -- and the combination of Docker and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS has raised the bar, introducing a new echelon of usability and convenience, and coupled with the trust and track record of enterprise grade Long Term Support from Canonical and the Ubuntu community.
Big thanks, by the way, to Paul Tagliamonte, upstream Debian packager of Docker.io, as well as all of the early testers and users of Docker during the Ubuntu development cycle.Docker is now officially in Ubuntu.  That makes Ubuntu 14.04 LTS the first enterprise grade Linux distribution to ship with Docker natively packaged, continuously tested, and instantly installable.  Millions of Ubuntu servers are now never more than three commands away from launching or managing Linux container sandboxes, thanks to Docker.


sudo apt-get install docker.io
sudo docker.io pull ubuntu
sudo docker.io run -i -t ubuntu /bin/bash


And after that last command, Ubuntu is now officially running within Docker, inside of a Linux container.

Brilliant.

Simple.

Elegant.

User friendly.

Just the way we like things in Ubuntu, thanks to our friends at Docker.io!

Cheers,:-Dustin

Ted Gould: HUD for the command line

Planet Ubuntu - Fri, 2014-04-18 17:46

Most expert users know how powerful the command line is on their Ubuntu system, but one of the common criticisms of it is that the commands themselves are hard to discover and remember the exact syntax for. To help a little bit with this I've created a small patch to the Ubuntu Terminal which adds entries into the HUD so that they can be searched by how people might think of the feature. Hopefully this will provide a way to introduce people to the command line, and provide experienced users with some commands that they might have not known about on their Ubuntu Phone. Let's look at one of the commands I added:

UnityActions.Action { text: i18n.tr("Networking Status") keywords: i18n.tr("Wireless;Ethernet;Access Points") onTriggered: ksession.sendText("\x03\nnm-tool\n") }

This command quite simply prints out the status of the networking on the device. But some folks probably don't think of it as networking, they just want to search for the wireless status. By using the HUD keywords feature we're able to add a list of other possible search strings for the command. Now someone can type wireless status into the HUD and figure out the command that they need. This is a powerful way to discover new functionality. Plus (and this is really important) these can all be translated into their local language.

It is tradition in my family to spend this weekend looking for brightly colored eggs that have been hidden. If you update your terminal application I hope you'll be able to enjoy the same tradition this weekend.

Stephan Adig: Thanks for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS

Planet Ubuntu - Fri, 2014-04-18 15:13

So at last it’s here. Ubuntu 14.04 LTS

And I have to say ‘Thank you’ for pushing this out.

I am running Trusty Tahr for a long time now, while it was still in development on my workstation. And it’s one of the best releases so far.

Even during development only some glitches were encountered, but were easily workarounded, and this is actually pretty amazing.

When you followed Ubuntu for some years now (and to some extend also invovled in pushing software to it), you know that this wasn’t always the case.

We had a couple of really serious hickups, but this release was very handsome. I think Canonicals push towards automated QA and the upload pocket behaviour change were the right things to do.

Thanks Guys, for delivering this amazing release. You really can celebrate and drink a lot of booze and have a good meal (well, now that Jono is the definitive Ubuntu Smoker King, he could serve some delicious pulled pork or whatever he is able to smoke ;))

Again, thank you, you all know who you are. You guys are amazing. Rock On!

Matthew Helmke: Seeing from Another Point of View

Planet Ubuntu - Fri, 2014-04-18 13:26

You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view — until you climb into his skin and walk around in it.
–To Kill a Mockingbird, Atticus Finch

These aren’t purely my thoughts. I’m sure I read something somewhere that sparked them, but I don’t have a link or citation, so I’m just being honest that I am not the source of all that I have written here, although I am using my words. Oh, and great book.

I’ve been thinking about this. I love the idea and I will always strive to learn about and understand other’s perspectives. But, I feel inadequate, like if I am to be honest, I really cannot do this. Not completely, anyway.

No matter how hard we try, we will each still see things with some skewing from your own perspective. We can never really know what it’s like to be that other person.

When you hear, see, or experience other people’s lives you may try to put yourself in their shoes and consider how you would deal with life as it has been dealt to them. That is noble.

However, it is impossible for us to actually do so. We hear, see, and experience things differently and our history and emotional, spiritual, mental, and intellectual makeup and status affect that. We each create our own reality based on our experiences filtered through all those layers of what we call self.

You can live with someone your/their whole life but that doesn’t mean you really understand their perspective. You may know intimate details or have a pretty good idea of what the other person is likely to think or do in certain situations based on past responses and patterns of behavior, but that is not really the same thing.

No matter how much we think we do, we are unable to climb fully into the mind and perspective of someone else. We are all made up of our perceptions, experiences of success and failures, societal programming, genders, and more. Humans are complex

To fully grasp another person’s perspective in its purest form we would have to wipe clear all of who we are and then copy over to ourselves who the other person is. It is not possible to eliminate our biases this way.

I’m starting to think that we can never really climb inside someone else’s skin, but we can hope to acquire a better understanding. The attempt is worth the effort, even if it can never be complete. We can learn to walk beside someone else. We can attempt to see things from their perspective. In doing so, we each hope we gave and gained something from it, drawing each of us a little bit closer to the other.

Rick Spencer: It's Easy and Fun to Write Map Based Apps

Planet Ubuntu - Fri, 2014-04-18 13:10
Yesterday I started work on an app that I personally want to use. I don't have a car, so I use services like Metro Bus, Metro Rail, Car2Go, and BikeShare around DC all the time. It's annoying to go to each different web page or app to get the information that I want, so I decided to write an app that combines it all for me in one place.

After asking around, I settled on a best practice for Ubuntu map apps, and I was pointed to this excellent code as a basis:
http://bazaar.launchpad.net/~yohanboniface/osmtouch/trunk/view/head:/OSMTouch.qml

It was so easy and fun once I got started, that I decided to show the world. So, here we go.

I started with a "Simple UI" project. Then I deleted the default column that it started with, and I set the title of the Page to an empty string. While I was at it, I changed the height and width to be more like a phone's dimensions to make testing a little easier. So my starter code for an emply Window looks like this: import QtQuick 2.0
import Ubuntu.Components 0.1
import "components"
MainView {
objectName: "mainView"
applicationName: "com.ubuntu.developer.rick-rickspencer3.MapExample"
width: units.gu(40)
height: units.gu(60)
Page
{
title: i18n.tr("")
}
}
So what's missing now is a map. First I need to import the parts of Qt where I get location and map information, so I add these imports:
import QtPositioning 5.2
import QtLocation 5.0
Then I can use the Map tag to add a Map to the MainView. I do four things in the Map to make it show up. First, I tell it to fill it's parent (normal for any component). Then I set it's center property. I choose to do this using a coordinate. Note that you can't make a coordinate in a declarative way, you have to construct it like below. The center property tells the map the latitude and longitude to be centered on. Then I choose the zoom level, which determines the scale of the map. Finally, I need to specify the plug in. For various reasons, I choose to use the Open Street Maps plugin, though feel free to experiment with others. So, a basic funcitonal map looks like this:
Page
{
title: i18n.tr("")
Map
{
anchors.fill: parent
center: QtPositioning.coordinate(38.87, -77.045)
zoomLevel: 13
plugin: Plugin { name: "osm"}
}
}
When I run it, I get a lot of functionality for free. On the desktop I can drag the map, and when I run the app on my phone or tablet, I can pinch to zoom in or out. All that functionality comes for free. Of course, you are free to add mapping controls as desired, but I find that map works well out of the box, at least on a device that supports pinch and zoom.


Typically, a map displays little pinpoints. These are often referred to as Points of Interest, or more typically "POI". It's delightfully easy to populate your map with POI using our old friend XmlListModel. First, you will need some XML that has location information. For this exmaple, I am going to use the Bike Share feed for Washington, DC. It's easy to get and to parse, so it makes a nice example. You can see the feed here:
https://www.capitalbikeshare.com/data/stations/bikeStations.xml

So let's use it to set up our XmlListModel. First, of course, we need to import the XmlListModel functionality.


import QtQuick.XmlListModel 2.0
Next, we'll make the list model, and use the query and Roles functionality to set up the model with the latitude and longitude of each POI inside the model. This is *exactly* like using the XmlListModel for a typical list view. Very cool.
XmlListModel
{
id: bikeStationModel
source: "https://www.capitalbikeshare.com/data/stations/bikeStations.xml"
query: "/stations/station"
XmlRole { name: "lat"; query: "lat/string()"; isKey: true }
XmlRole { name: "lng"; query: "long/string()"; isKey: true }
}
Now that I have my list model set up, it's time to display them on the Map. We don't do that with a ListView, but rather wtih a MapItemView. This works exactly the same as a ListView, except it displays items on a map instead of in a list. Just like a ListView I need a delegate that will translate use data from the each item in the XmlListModel to create a UI element. In this case, it's a MapQuickItem instead of a ListItem (or similar). A MapQuickItem needs to know 4 things.

  1. The model where it will get the data. In this case, it's my XmlListModel, but it could be a javascript list or other model as well.
  2. A latitude and longitude for the POI, which I set up as roles in the XmlListModel.
  3. An offset for whatever I am using for POI so that it is positioned properly. In this case I have made a little pushpin image out of the bikeshare logo (I know it's bad I'll make a better one later :) ). The offset is set by anchorPoint, so I make the anchorPoint the bottom and center of of the pushpin. 
  4. Something to use for the POI. In this case, I choose to use an image. Note that it is important to use grid units, or the POI may appear too small on some devices, and too large on others. Grid Units make them "just right" on all devices, and ensure that users can click them on any device. 


So, here is my MapItemView that goes *inside* the Map tag. It's a MapItemView for the map, after all.

MapItemView
{
model: bikeStationModel
delegate: MapQuickItem
{
id: poiItem
coordinate: QtPositioning.coordinate(lat,lng)
anchorPoint.x: poiImage.width * 0.5
anchorPoint.y: poiImage.height
sourceItem: Image
{
id: poiImage
width: units.gu(2)
height: units.gu(2)
source: "bike_poi.png"
}
}
}
Now when I run the app, the POI are displayed. As you would expect, when the user moves the Map, the MapItemView automatically displays the correct POI. It's really that easy.


If you want to add interactivity, that's easy, you can simply add a MouseArea to the Image and then use things like Ubuntu.Components.Popups to popup additional information about the POI. 


This sample code is here: http://bazaar.launchpad.net/~rick-rickspencer3/+junk/MapExample/view/head:/MapExample.qml

Kubuntu Wire: Kubuntu 14.04 LTS Feedback

Planet Ubuntu - Fri, 2014-04-18 11:50

Kubuntu 14.04 LTS was released yesterday along with the all new KDE SC 4.13.  Browsing around the internet this morning the feedback feels really good.  Here’s some of my favourite quotes.

spiros spiros on Google+

Thank you for this great release

César J. Pinto on Google+

My God… I’m very surprise with kubuntu… it feels more fast than unity and gnome. wow…. I just…. i have no words to describe my happiness

@srikrishnaholla on Twitter

Downloading #kubuntu 14.04 LTS. Man, I’ve missed #kde !

 

@gholmer on Twitter
 

Get it while it’s hot! Newest Ubuntu with the king of desktop environments, KDE! #kubuntu http://www.kubuntu.org

@apachelogger on Twitter [OK he's not entirely neutral]

This is the best release so far! Such awesome, so #Kubuntu 14.04 LTS! http://goo.gl/jQFdZJ  #bestreleaseever

@jotakinhan on Twitter

Using #kubuntu again after using other distros for long time and its great!

@LowEndGeek on Twitter

Re-visiting #kde on #kubuntu 14.04 Working much better than regular #ubuntu

One of the first reviews was on Tux Arena:

“It is a beautiful release and it will definitely be here to stay for quite some time”

And in my inbox:

From: Robert Kovacs

Subject: Excellent Release Kubuntu 14.04

Date: Fri, 18 Apr 2014 00:15:33 -0400

Thanks for all the hard work!. Kudos to the Kubuntu team. Just installed     Kubuntu 14.04 and everything is working fine. Was using Kubuntu 12.04.3,    which was also a great release.

Cheers!.
Bob Kovacs (USA)

Bryan Quigley: XP to Ubuntu Installfest worksheet

Planet Ubuntu - Fri, 2014-04-18 05:20

Just finished up the first draft of an Installfest worksheet.  Let me know what you think…

XP to Ubuntu Worksheet

Mythbuntu: Mythbuntu 14.04 Released! (Better late than never edition)

Planet Ubuntu - Fri, 2014-04-18 03:09
After some last minute critical fixes and ISO respins by the release team (thanks again Infinity, we owe you and the rest of the release team a beer), the Mythbuntu team is proud to announce we have removed our socks (see relevant post) and released Mythbuntu 14.04 LTS. This is the Mythbuntu team's second LTS release and is supported until shortly after the 16.04 release.With this release, we are providing mirroring on sponsored mirrors and torrents. It is very important to note that this release is only compatible with MythTV 0.27 systems. The MythTV component of previous Mythbuntu releases can be be upgraded to a compatible MythTV version by using the Mythbuntu Repos. For a more detailed explanation, see here.You can get the Mythbuntu 14.04 ISO from our downloads page.Highlights
  • MythTV 0.27 (2:0.27.0+fixes.20140324.8ee257c-0ubuntu3)
  • This is our second LTS release (the first being 12.04). See this page for more info.
Underlying system
  • Underlying Ubuntu updates are found here
MythTV
  • Recent snapshot of the MythTV 0.27 release is included (see 0.27 Release Notes)
  • Mythbuntu theme fixes
We appreciated all comments and would love to hear what you think. Please make comments to our mailing list, on the forums (with a tag indicating that this is from 14.04 or trusty), or in #ubuntu-mythtv on Freenode. As previously, if you encounter any issues with anything in this release, please file a bug using the Ubuntu bug tool (ubuntu-bug PACKAGENAME) which automatically collects logs and other important system information, or if that is not possible, directly open a ticket on Launchpad (http://bugs.launchpad.net/mythbuntu/14.04/).
Known issues
  • Upgraders should hold off until our first point (14.04.1) coming this summer. (See bugs #1307546 )
  • If upgrading and you have mythstream installed. Please remove mythstream before upgrading as mythstream is no longer supported.
  • If you have used Jamu in the past, you should run "mythmetadatalookup --refresh-all"
  • If you are upgrading and want to use the HTTP Live Streaming you need to create a Streaming storage group

Jono Bacon: Ubuntu 14.04 Is Out!

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 2014-04-17 22:58

My apologies in advance for the shorter blog post about this, but like many other Ubuntu folks, I am absolutely exhausted right now. Everyone, across the board, has been working their collective socks off to make Ubuntu 14.04 LTS a fantastic release on desktop, server, and cloud, and pull together our next iteration of Ubuntu for smart-phones and tablets. Consequently, when the trigger is pulled to share our final product with the world, release day is often less of a blistering and energetic woo-hoo, but more of an exhausted but satisfying oh-yeah (complete with beer firmly clenched in hand).

I am hugely proud of this release. The last six months have arguably been our busiest yet. No longer are we just working on desktop and server editions of Ubuntu, but we are building for the cloud and full convergence across the client. No longer are we “just” pulling together the fruits of upstream software projects but we are building our own platform too; the Ubuntu SDK, developer eco-system, charm store, image-based updates, push notifications, app lifecycle, and more. While the work has been intense and at times frantic, it has always been measured and carefully executed. Much of this has been thanks to many of our most under-thanked people; the members of our tremendous QA and CI teams.

Today, tomorrow, and for weeks to come our users, the press, the industry, and others will assess our work in Ubuntu 14.04 across these different platforms, and I am very confident they will love what they see. Ubuntu 14.04 embodies the true spirit of Ubuntu; innovation, openness, and people.

But as we wait to see the reviews let’s take a moment for each other. Now is a great time to reach out to each other and those Ubuntu folks you know (and don’t know) and share some kudos, some thanks, and some great stories. Until we get to the day where machines make software, today software is made by people and great software is built by great people.

Thanks everyone for every ounce of effort you fed into Ubuntu and our many flavors. We just took another big leap forward towards our future.

Jonathan Riddell: Trust in Trusty 14.04 LTS

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 2014-04-17 22:16
KDE Project:


Trust in Me

You've been waiting for it, we've been working hard on it.. it's the new Long Term Support release of Kubuntu!

This means we've been working hard on removing bugs, polishing features and not adding new ones. This will probably be the last release before KDE Frameworks 5 and Plasma Next gets introduced so for those who like to live life on the cautious side you'll be pleased to know the Long Term Support label means we'll have important bug fixes and security fixes for the next 5 years. It'll also get backports of important KDE software for the next couple of years.


But that doesn't mean there's nothing new. Take a look at the release announcement for a long list. For one thing we're the first distro to ship with KDE SC 4.13 fresh out today. It brings a much nicer desktop search capability that makes search fly.

Muon is slicker, all new Driver Manager means hardware works better, Gwenview plugins mean it's easier to upload to Facebook, KDE Connect makes your phone talk to your laptop.

All wrapped up with the safety of commercial support if you need it and plenty of community support if you need that.

I'd like to thank Harald who put in a lot of effort in this release, even writing up release notes which I've never found anyone to help with before. Rohan did crutial last minute bugfixes including at the last minute and nifty new features like the Driver Manager. Aurelien took care of Ubiquity to get your installs looking nice. We've all new documentation thanks to Aaron and Valerie and others. Scott kept the policy ticking over. Phillip got things packaged, debfx had bug fixes when it was needed most, Michal keeping an eye on the important packages, Scarlett being the Queen of packaging for KF5 and others. Really what a wonderful team effort.

And next? We'll be looking at making KDE Frameworks usable, Plasma 2014.6 may be the next desktop and who knows we may even get something working with Wayland. it's exiting! Come and join us, chat in #kubuntu-devel and join the kubuntu-devel mailing list.

James Page: OpenStack 2014.1 for Ubuntu 12.04 and 14.04 LTS

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 2014-04-17 21:51

I’m pleased to announce the general availability of OpenStack 2014.1 (Icehouse) in Ubuntu 14.04 LTS and in the Ubuntu Cloud Archive (UCA) for Ubuntu 12.04 LTS.

Users of Ubuntu 14.04 need take no further action other than follow their favourite install guide – but do take some time to checkout the release notes for Ubuntu 14.04.

Ubuntu 12.04 users can enable the Icehouse pocket of the UCA by running:

sudo add-apt-repository cloud-archive:icehouse

The Icehouse pocket of the UCA also includes updates for associated packages including Ceph 0.79 (which will be updated to the Ceph 0.80 Firefly stable release), Open vSwitch 2.0.1, qemu 2.0.0 and libvirt 1.2.2 – you can checkout the full list here.

Thanks goes to all of the people who have contributed to making OpenStack rock this release cycle – both upstream and in Ubuntu!

Remember that you can report bugs on packages from the UCA for Ubuntu 12.04 and from Ubuntu 14.04 using the ubuntu-bug tool – for example:

ubuntu-bug nova

will report the bug in the right place on launchpad and add some basic information about your installation.

The Juju charms for OpenStack have also been updated to support deployment of OpenStack Icehouse on Ubuntu 14.04 and Ubuntu 12.04.  Read the charm release notes for more details on the new features that have been enabled during this development cycle.

Canonical have a more concise install guide in the pipeline for deploying OpenStack using Juju and MAAS  – watch this space for more information…

EOM

 


Svetlana Belkin: 14.04 Release Today

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 2014-04-17 21:30

Stephen Michael Kellat asked me to post this:

Greetings Ohio.

As this is sent, the release announcement for Ubuntu and its many flavors is not up yet. Please take the time to download the 14.04 Long Term Support Release and to liberally seed torrents if you can. So far Xubuntu 14.04 has been wonderful and I am an “apt-get dist-upgrade” away from transitioning off beta to final on my installed base.

Discs for distribution have **not** been pre-ordered. If there is interest in doing a disc distribution campaign, please talk to the three Deputies about making a plan. I will not order discs to just have lay around gathering dust.

Have a great Thursday. Svetlana Belkin, James Gifford, Unit193…I leave the celebrations for you to lead. Svetlana, please post a copy of this message to your blog with such comment as you deem fit. My duties at work plus commute time prevent my celebrating much for this release on release day.

Stephen Michael Kellat
Point of Contact/Leader, Ubuntu Ohio
Member, LoCo Council

As for me, I have Ubuntu 14.04 32 bit on one of my laptops and I will have a review of Ubuntu 14.04 up soon.


Mythbuntu: Mythbuntu 14.04 is... coming later.

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 2014-04-17 20:15
While doing final QA testing of the image, the Mythbuntu team found a few release critical bugs. Despite our best efforts we were unable to resolve these issues in time so today we made the tough decision and decided to pull the ISO that was to be released.
We would like to congratulate the other Ubuntu Flavors on their 14.04 releases and have plans to join them with our 14.04 release in the next week. We would also like to thank all of our users for their patience and their continued support.
Critical Bugs

Ronnie Tucker: Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) released

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 2014-04-17 19:33

The Ubuntu team is very pleased to announce our fifth long-term support
release, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS for Desktop, Server, Cloud, and Core, as well
as Ubuntu 14.04 for Phone and Tablet products.

Codenamed “Trusty Tahr”, 14.04 LTS continues Ubuntu’s proud tradition
of integrating the latest and greatest open source technologies into a
high-quality, easy-to-use Linux distribution.  The team has been hard at
work through this cycle, introducing new features and fixing bugs.

Ubuntu 14.04 LTS is the first long-term support release with support
for the new “arm64″ architecture for 64-bit ARM systems, as well as the
“ppc64el” architecture for little-endian 64-bit POWER systems.  This
release also includes several subtle but welcome improvements to Unity,
AppArmor, and a host of other great software.

Ubuntu Server 14.04 LTS includes the Icehouse release of OpenStack,
alongside deployment and management tools that save devops teams time
when deploying distributed applications – whether on private clouds,
public clouds, x86 or ARM servers, or on developer laptops.  Several key
server technologies, from MAAS to Ceph, have been updated to new upstream
versions with a variety of new features.

The newest Kubuntu, Edubuntu, Xubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu GNOME, Ubuntu
Kylin, and Ubuntu Studio are also being released today.  More details
can be found for these at their individual release notes:

   https://wiki.ubuntu.com/TrustyTahr/ReleaseNotes#Official_flavours

Maintenance updates will be provided for 5 years for Ubuntu Desktop,
Ubuntu Server, Ubuntu Cloud, Ubuntu Core, Ubuntu Kylin, Edubuntu, and
Kubuntu.  All the remaining flavours will be supported for 3 years.

To get Ubuntu 14.04 LTS

In order to download Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, visit:

   http://www.ubuntu.com/download

Users of Ubuntu 12.10 and 13.10 will be offered an automatic upgrade to
14.04 LTS via Update Manager shortly. Users of 12.04 LTS will be
offered the automatic upgrade when 14.04.1 LTS is released, which is
scheduled for July 24th. For further information about upgrading, see:

   http://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop/upgrade

As always, upgrades to the latest version of Ubuntu are entirely free
of charge.

We recommend that all users read the release notes, which document
caveats, workarounds for known issues, as well as more in-depth notes
on the release itself. They are available at:

   http://wiki.ubuntu.com/TrustyTahr/ReleaseNotes

Find out what’s new in this release with a graphical overview:

   http://www.ubuntu.com/desktop
   http://www.ubuntu.com/desktop/features

Ubuntu GNOME: Ubuntu GNOME 14.04 LTS is released

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 2014-04-17 19:19

The Ubuntu GNOME Team is proud and happy to announce the release of Ubuntu GNOME 14.04 LTS.

Ubuntu GNOME is an official flavour of Ubuntu, featuring the GNOME desktop environment. Ubuntu GNOME is a mostly pure GNOME desktop experience built from the Ubuntu repositories. This is our very first Long Term Release (LTS) version.

Release Notes

Please read the Release Notes before Downloading Ubuntu GNOME 14.04 LTS:
https://wiki.ubuntu.com/TrustyTahr/ReleaseNotes/UbuntuGNOME

Get Ubuntu GNOME 14.04 LTS

There are important steps you need to be aware of before installing Ubuntu GNOME 14.04 LTS so please read carefully: Download Ubuntu GNOME 14.04 LTS

Ubuntu Announcement and Release Notes

Please see this link.

Contact Us

Please, see the full list of our communications channels

Thank you everyone

To each and everyone who participated, helped, supported and contributed to Ubuntu GNOME this cycle; big thanks to all of you.

Ubuntu GNOME Team has gone the extra miles by putting extraordinary efforts to the point, the team was ready to apply for the LTS Status. We have done all what we could to achieve that and indeed we have and therefore, we gained and deserved the LTS Status. Without a doubt, that is a huge achievement in our history.

Special thanks to our testers who did a unique great job to make Ubuntu GNOME better. As a result of all these efforts, we have a great LTS release to be proud of.

Thank you for choosing and using Ubuntu GNOME.

Ali/amjjawad
QA Lead of Ubuntu GNOME

The Fridge: Ubuntu 14.04 (Trusty Tahr) released

Planet Ubuntu - Thu, 2014-04-17 18:14

The Ubuntu team is very pleased to announce our fifth long-term support release, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS for Desktop, Server, Cloud, and Core, as well as Ubuntu 14.04 for Phone and Tablet products.

Codenamed "Trusty Tahr", 14.04 LTS continues Ubuntu’s proud tradition of integrating the latest and greatest open source technologies into a high-quality, easy-to-use Linux distribution. The team has been hard at work through this cycle, introducing new features and fixing bugs.

Ubuntu 14.04 LTS is the first long-term support release with support for the new "arm64" architecture for 64-bit ARM systems, as well as the "ppc64el" architecture for little-endian 64-bit POWER systems. This release also includes several subtle but welcome improvements to Unity, AppArmor, and a host of other great software.

Ubuntu Server 14.04 LTS includes the Icehouse release of OpenStack, alongside deployment and management tools that save devops teams time when deploying distributed applications – whether on private clouds, public clouds, x86 or ARM servers, or on developer laptops. Several key server technologies, from MAAS to Ceph, have been updated to new upstream versions with a variety of new features.

The newest Kubuntu, Edubuntu, Xubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu GNOME, Ubuntu Kylin, and Ubuntu Studio are also being released today. More details can be found for these at their individual release notes:

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/TrustyTahr/ReleaseNotes#Official_flavours

Maintenance updates will be provided for 5 years for Ubuntu Desktop, Ubuntu Server, Ubuntu Cloud, Ubuntu Core, Ubuntu Kylin, Edubuntu, and Kubuntu. All the remaining flavours will be supported for 3 years.

To get Ubuntu 14.04 LTS

In order to download Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, visit:

http://www.ubuntu.com/download

Users of Ubuntu 12.10 and 13.10 will be offered an automatic upgrade to 14.04 LTS via Update Manager shortly. Users of 12.04 LTS will be offered the automatic upgrade when 14.04.1 LTS is released, which is scheduled for July 24th. For further information about upgrading, see:

http://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop/upgrade

As always, upgrades to the latest version of Ubuntu are entirely free of charge.

We recommend that all users read the release notes, which document caveats, workarounds for known issues, as well as more in-depth notes on the release itself. They are available at:

http://wiki.ubuntu.com/TrustyTahr/ReleaseNotes

Find out what’s new in this release with a graphical overview:

http://www.ubuntu.com/desktop
http://www.ubuntu.com/desktop/features

If you have a question, or if you think you may have found a bug but aren’t sure, you can try asking in any of the following places:

#ubuntu on irc.freenode.net
http://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-users
http://www.ubuntuforums.org
http://askubuntu.com

Help Shape Ubuntu

If you would like to help shape Ubuntu, take a look at the list of ways you can participate at:

http://www.ubuntu.com/community/get-involved

About Ubuntu

Ubuntu is a full-featured Linux distribution for desktops, laptops, netbooks and servers, with a fast and easy installation and regular releases. A tightly-integrated selection of excellent applications is included, and an incredible variety of add-on software is just a few clicks away.

Professional services including support are available from Canonical and hundreds of other companies around the world. For more information about support, visit:

http://www.ubuntu.com/support

More Information

You can learn more about Ubuntu and about this release on our website listed below:

http://www.ubuntu.com

To sign up for future Ubuntu announcements, please subscribe to Ubuntu’s very low volume announcement list at:

http://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-announce

Originally posted to the ubuntu-announce mailing list on Thu Apr 17 17:09:54 UTC 2014 by Adam Conrad

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