Planet Ubuntu
Subscribe to Planet Ubuntu feed
Planet Ubuntu - http://planet.ubuntu.com/
Updated: 4 hours 22 min ago

Zygmunt Krynicki: PlainBox Providers for Everyone

Mon, 2014-03-31 20:16
With the imminent release of PlainBox 0.5.2 providers with native executables (read: compiled code) are a reality.

Have a look at https://github.com/plainbox-providers/ for two very simple examples. Fork them, star them, share them, edit them, break them.

The final release of PlainBox will be made to pypi, Debian synchronized to Ubuntu. Early builds are already available in our PPA (as soon as the recipe builds finish).

About PlainBox: PlainBox is a toolkit consisting of python3 library, development tools, documentation and examples. It is targeted at developers working on testing or certification applications and authors creating tests for such applications.

Serge Hallyn: Nested lxc

Mon, 2014-03-31 14:22

One of the core features of cgmanager is to easily, safely, and transparently support the cgroup requirements of container nesting. Processes can administer cgroups exactly the same way whether inside a container or not. This also makes nested lxc very easy.

To create a container in which you can use cgroups, first create a container as usual (note, do this on an Ubuntu 14.04 system, unless you have enabled all the pieces you need – which I am not covering here):

sudo lxc-create -t download -n t1 -- -d ubuntu -r trusty -a amd64

Now to bind the cgmanager socket inside the container,

echo "lxc.mount.auto = cgroup" | sudo tee -a /var/lib/lxc/t1/config

If you also want to be able to start nested containers, then you need to use an apparmor profile which allows lxc mounting:

echo "lxc.aa_profile = lxc-container-default-with-nesting" | \ sudo tee -a /var/lib/lxc/t1/config

Now, simply start the container

sudo lxc-start -n t1

You can run the cgmanager testsuite,

sudo apt-get -y install cgmanager-tests cd /usr/share/cgmanager/tests sudo ./runtests.sh

and use the cgm program to interact with cgmanager

cgm ping sudo cgm create all compile sudo cgm chown all compile 1000 1000 cgm movepid all compile $$

If you changed the aa_profile to permit nesting, then you can simply create and use containers inside the t1 container.

What I showed here is using privileged (root-owned) containers. In this case, the lxc-container-default-with-nesting profile is actually far less safe than the default profile. However, when using unprivileged containers (https://www.stgraber.org/2014/01/17/lxc-1-0-unprivileged-containers/) for at least the first layer, nesting works the exact same way, and the profile safety difference becomes moot.


Nicholas Skaggs: Time to test trusty!

Mon, 2014-03-31 12:00

Say that three times fast. Time to test trusty,
time to test trusty, time to test trusty!Ahh it's my favorite time of the cycle. This is the part were we all get serious, go a little bit crazy, and end super excited to release a new version of ubuntu into the world. This time it's even more special as the new version is a brand new LTS, which we look forward to supporting for the next 5 years.


The developers and early adopters have been working hard all cycle to put forth the best version of ubuntu to date. For you! For all of us! It's time to fix bugs, do last minute polish and prepare for the release candidate which will occur around April 11th.

We need you!
This is were you dear reader come in. You see despite their good looks and wonderful sense of humor and charm, the release team doesn't like to release final images of ubuntu that haven't been thoroughly tested.

The release team is ready to pounce on untested imagesWe need testing, and further, we need the results of that testing! We need to hear from you. Passing test results matter just as much as failures. The way to record these results is via the isotracker; we can't read your mind sadly!

How to help
Mark your calendars now for April 11th - April 16th. Pick a good date for you and plan to download and test the release candidate image. You'll see a new milestone on the tracker, and an announcement here as well when the image is ready. I won't let you forget, promise!

Execute the testcases for ubuntu and your favorite flavor images. Install or upgrade your machine and keep on the lookout for any issues you might find, however small.

I need a guide!
Sound scary? It's simpler than you might think. Checkout the guide and other links at the top of the tracker for help.

I got stuck!
Help is a simple email away, or for realtime help try #ubuntu-quality on freenode. Here's all the ways of getting ahold of the quality team who would love to help.

Community
Plan to help test and verify the images for trusty and take part in making ubuntu! You'll join a community of people who do there best everyday to ensure ubuntu is an amazing experience. Here's saying thanks, from me and everyone else in the community for your efforts. Happy testing!

Mark Shuttleworth: #10 Ubuntu is built on IAAS for IAAS users

Mon, 2014-03-31 11:44

Every detail matters, and building great software means taking time to remove the papercuts. Ubuntu has over the past 5 years been refined in many ways to feel amazingly comfortable on the cloud. In the very early days of EC2 growth the Ubuntu team recognised how many developers were enjoying fast access to infrastructure on demand, and we set about polishing up Ubuntu to be amazing on the cloud.

This was a big program of work; the Linux experience had many bad assumptions baked in – everything had been designed to be installed once on a server then left largely untouched for as long as possible, but cloud infrastructure was much more dynamic than that.

We encouraged our team to use the cloud as much as possible, which made the work practical and motivated people to get it right themselves. If you want to catch all the little scratchy bits, make it part of your everyday workflow. Today, we have added OpenStack clouds to the mix, as well as the major public clouds. Cloud vendors have taken diverse approaches to IAAS so we find ourselves encouraging developers to use all of them to get a holistic view, and also to address any cloud-specific issues that arise. But the key point is – if it’s great for us, that’s a good start on making it great for everybody.

Then we set about interviewing cloud users and engaging people who were deep into cloud infrastructure to advise on what they needed. We spent a lot of time immersing ourselves in the IAAS experience through the eyes of cloud users – startups and industrial titans, universities and mid-sized, everyday companies. We engaged the largest and fastest-moving cloud users like Netflix, who have said they enjoy Ubuntu as a platform on the cloud. And that in turn drove our prioritisation of paper-cuts and significant new features for cloud users.

We also looked at the places people actually spend time developing. Lots of them are on Ubuntu desktops, but Windows and MacOS are popular too, and it takes some care to make it very easy for folks there to have a great devops experience.

All of this is an industrial version of the user experience design process that also powers our work on desktop, tablet and phone – system interfaces and applications. Devops, sysadmins, developers and their managers are humans too, so human-centric design principles are just as important on the infrastructure as they are on consumer electronics and consumer software. Feeling great at the command line, being productive as an operator and a developer, are vital to our community and our ecosystem. We keep all the potency of Linux with the polish of a refined, designed environment.

Along the way we invented and designed a whole raft of key new pieces of Ubuntu. I’ll write about one of them, cloud-init, next. The net effect of that work makes Ubuntu really useful on every cloud. That’s why the majority of developers using IAAS do so on Ubuntu.

Benjamin Kerensa: Ubuntu Users Win Back Privacy

Mon, 2014-03-31 06:59

Ubuntu users and privacy advocates have won a big victory as Canonical’s Michael Hall announced yesterday that future versions of Unity will give users the option to opt-in to searches using online sources. Back in September 2012, I had reached out to both the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) and Free Software Foundation (FSF) and blogged about the new feature landing in Ubuntu 12.10 that would breach user privacy and leak desktop queries.

The EFF and FSF both responded by outlining why this new feature was a breach of user privacy and called on Canonical to fix the feature. For two releases, Canonical maintained that the online search feature was something users liked (apparently having done user studies) and that it respected user privacy.

Yesterday’s announcement clearly indicates that the feature was not something that users valued and that the feature did indeed raise privacy concerns. Later in 2013, Canonical went as far as to abuse Trademark Law by sending an employee of the Electronic Frontier Foundation a frivolous legal notice which had no validity.

For what its worth, this change in the Unity Desktop will address the issues that users, developers, and advocates have raised over the last two years and puts Ubuntu back in parity with other Linux Distros in terms of privacy.

I applaud the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Free Software Foundation, and Privacy International for championing the privacy and choice of Ubuntu Users.

Costales: Touchpad-indicator: A really useful app

Sun, 2014-03-30 09:12
Disable/enable the touchpad when you plug/unplug a mouse in your laptop:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:atareao/atareao
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install touchpad-indicator

An  atareao app.

Ubuntu GNOME: How Can I help Ubuntu GNOME with Testing?

Sun, 2014-03-30 08:17

Hi everyone,

While this post might be obvious for some of you, I feel it is not yet clear for some others and I thought it might be a good idea to clear some confusion and make life easier.

Introduction
My job within Ubuntu GNOME Team is not easy at all. One of the things that I like to do and I have to do (because of my commitments with Ubuntu GNOME) is being in touch with all the users of Ubuntu GNOME. This is alone is a huge burden if you ask me and I can assure you (from +3 years experience of doing that), it is very stressful and hard but I do like it. I’ve seen so many posts on our Social Media and Emails on our Mailing Lists. Most of those who would love to help Ubuntu GNOME to get better and better are confused and not sure what to do?
I don’t blame them simply because I do feel them. I’ve been there once and I know how frustrating it is when you want to do something you want badly but you can’t because of lack of information (for example) or lack of experience and/or lack of communications. There are really many reasons for that.

Today, I’d like to make life a lot easier for everyone and hopefully end that confusion with this post. I will give it a try. If I couldn’t make life easier then I didn’t fail, I just found 10,000 ways that didn’t work and will never give up nor surrender and will keep trying. Ubuntu GNOME as a team has many priorities, one of the most important among these are Our Users. However, to be logical here, we can’t please everyone as this is the key to failure. Not to mention, nothing is perfect.

So, are you ready?

How Can I help Ubuntu GNOME with Testing?

  • Step 1: Please read the Testing Wiki Page. It is really very easy to find it. It is almost on all our channels, not to mention you can only bookmark our OneStopPage to have access to each and every Wiki and/or Document that Ubuntu GNOME Team has.
  • Step 2: If the information on the Testing Wiki Page wasn’t enough, there is a link at the very bottom of the Testing Wiki Page called See Also. Click See Also and you will get more details about Testing.
  • Step 3: If and only if you did read the Testing Wiki Page and the Activities Wiki Page and got stuck somewhere or have any Question, please don’t hesitate to Contact Us . If we will be late in response to your email or post, that means real life got into our way. Otherwise, we shall get back to you ASAP.
  • Step 4: Done.

Yes indeed. That is all what you need to know.
Our Wiki Pages are organized and documented in a way that could help you at any time without the need to ask anything. But, just in case, we shall be always there waiting for you if you have any question in mind.

Summary
Now, you do have the first resource of information regarding testing, that is: Ubuntu GNOME Testing Wiki Page.

Also, your second resource of information which is actually a support resource more than just informational: Ubuntu GNOME Team – Just Contact Us.

I hope this is crystal clear now

As always, thank you for choosing, helping, supporting and testing Ubuntu GNOME!

The real power behind any Linux Distribution is not the Developers but the Testers. Without Testing, we would never know whether our system is rock solid or a buggy system.

Happy Testing!

Ali/amjjawad
Lead of Ubuntu GNOME QA Team

Ronnie Tucker: Full Circle #83 is here to make you feel guilty about your spending.

Fri, 2014-03-28 19:22

Full Circle
Issue #83

Full Circle - the independent magazine for the Ubuntu Linux community are proud to announce the release of our eighty-third issue.

This month:
* Command & Conquer
* How-To : Backup In Ubuntu, LibreOffice, and MultiSystem.
* Graphics : GIMP G’MIC and Inkscape.
* Review: HomeBank
* Security Q&A
* What Is: CryptoCurrency
* NEW! - Open Source Design
plus: Q&A, Linux Labs, Ask The New Guy, Ubuntu Games, and a competition!

Get it while it’s hot!
http://fullcirclemagazine.org/issue-83/

Colin King: Firmware Test Suite new features for the Ubuntu 14.04 LTS release

Fri, 2014-03-28 14:46
In the last 6 months the Firmware Test Suite (fwts) has seen a lot of development and bug fixing activity in preparation for the Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Trusty release.  It is timely to give a brief overview of new features and improvements that have landed in this busy development cycle:

UEFI uefidump, additional support for:
  • KEK, KEKDefault, PK, PKDefault global variables scan
  • db, dbx, dbt variables scan
  • messaging device path: add Fibre Channel Ex subtype-21, ATA subtype-18, Fibre Channel Ex subtype-21, USB WWID subtype-16, VLAN subtype-20, Device Logical Unit subtype-17, SAS Ex subtype-22, iSCSI subtype-19, NVM Express namespace subtype-23, Media Protocol subtype-5, PIWG Firmware File subtype-6, PIWG Firmware Volume subtype-7 and extend the Messaging Device Path type Vendor subtype-10.
ACPI related:
  • Update to ACPICA version 20140325 
  • Add S3 hybrid suspend / resume support with new --s3-hybrid option 
  • Improved reporting of errors on ACPI evaluation errors
  • New _PLD, _CRS and _PRS dump utilities
  • New General Purpose Events (GPE) dump utility
  • --disassemble-aml option accepts an output directory argument
  • Add DBG2, DBGP, SPCR and MCHI tables to acpidump utility 
  • Add -R, --rsdp option to specify the RSDP address
  • _IFT, _SRV, _PIC, _UDP, _UPP, _PMM, _MSG, _GAI, _CID, _CDM and _CBA checks added to method test
SMBIOS:
  • dmicheck: add more checks for invalid DMI fields
Architecture related:
  • Support for i386 amd64 armel armhf aarch64 ppc64 ppc64e.  fwts support for aarch64 was a notable achievement
Kernel Log Scanning:
  • Sync klog scanning with 3.13 kernel error messages
Miscellaneous:
  • Remove unused LaunchPad bug tagging
  • Add Ivybridge and Haswell MSRs to msr test
  • Check CPU maximum frequencies
The fwts regression tests have been incorporated into the fwts repository and can be run with "make check". These tests are automatically run at build time to catch regressions.  fwts is now being regularly checked with static code analysis tools smatch, cppcheck and Coverity Scan and this has helped find memory leaks and numerous corner case bugs.  We also exercise fwts with a database of ACPI tables from real hardware and synthetically generated broken tables to check for regressions. 

Contributors to fwts in the current release cycle are (in alphabetical order):  Alex Hung, Colin King, Ivan Hu, Jeffrey Bastian, Keng-Yu Lin, Matt Fleming.  Also, thanks to Naresh Bhat for testing and feedback for the aarch64 port and to Robert Moore for the on-going work with ACPICA.

As ever, all contributions are welcome, including bug reports and feature requests.  Visit the fwts wiki page for more details.

Paul Tagliamonte: Sundays (how they're going)

Fri, 2014-03-28 01:36

As some of you know, I’ve started to take Sundays off, and this is mostly a post to continue to hold myself accountable, and to assure everyone that yes! That’s still going on!

I’ve found my Saturdays to be more productive, and my Sundays to be much more enjoyable and stress-free.

For those that don’t know, I’m not even using any computer through my Sundays (hilariously dubbed “paul-tag” by my friends (only Germans would find this funny, though :) )), but my tablet and phone seem to be OK (but I actively avoid email)

If anyone’s on the fence, I highly recommend doing this, it’s really great.

The Fridge: Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) Final Beta released

Fri, 2014-03-28 00:00

The Ubuntu team is pleased to announce the final beta release of Ubuntu 14.04 LTS Desktop, Server, Cloud, and Core products.

Codenamed "Trusty Tahr", 14.04 LTS continues Ubuntu’s proud tradition of integrating the latest and greatest open source technologies into a high-quality, easy-to-use Linux distribution. The team has been hard at work through this cycle, introducing new features and fixing bugs.

This beta release includes images from not only the Ubuntu Desktop, Server, Cloud, and Core products, but also the Edubuntu, Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu GNOME, UbuntuKylin, Ubuntu Studio and Xubuntu flavours.

In addition to the above flavours, it’s expected that, despite missing the final beta, Mythbuntu will be participating in the final release.

This is a very exciting LTS (long term support) release for Ubuntu’s family of community flavours, as this is the first time that all of our flavours have applied and been approved for LTS status, some for the same five years as Ubuntu itself, and some for a shorter period of three years. This will be highlighted on a per-flavour basis in the final release announcement.

The beta images are known to be reasonably free of showstopper CD build or installer bugs, while representing a very recent snapshot of 14.04 that should be representative of the features intended to ship with the final release expected on April 17th, 2014.

Ubuntu, Ubuntu Server, Ubuntu Core, Cloud Images

Trusty Final Beta includes updated versions of most of our core set of packages, including a current 3.13.6 kernel, a new upstart, and many more.

To upgrade to Ubuntu 14.04 Final Beta from Ubuntu 13.10, follow these instructions:

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/TrustyUpgrades

The Ubuntu 14.04 Final Beta images can be downloaded at:

http://www.ubuntu.com/testing/download (Ubuntu and Ubuntu Server)

Additional images can be found at the following links:

The full release notes for Ubuntu 14.04 Final Beta can be found at:

https://wiki.ubuntu.com/TrustyTahr/ReleaseNotes

Edubuntu

Edubuntu is a flavor of Ubuntu designed as a free education oriented operating system for kids of all ages.

The Final Beta images can be downloaded at: http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/edubuntu/releases/14.04/beta-2/

More information on the Edubuntu Final Beta cand be found here: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/TrustyTahr/ReleaseNotes/Edubuntu

Kubuntu

Kubuntu is the KDE based flavour of Ubuntu. It uses the Plasma desktop and includes a wide selection of tools from the KDE project.

The Final Beta images can be downloaded at: http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/kubuntu/releases/14.04/beta-2/

More information on Kubuntu Final Beta can be found here:
https://wiki.ubuntu.com/TrustyTahr/Beta2/Kubuntu

Lubuntu

Lubuntu is a flavor of Ubuntu that targets to be lighter, less resource hungry and more energy-efficient by using lightweight applications and LXDE, The Lightweight X11 Desktop Environment, as its default GUI.

The Final Beta images can be downloaded at: http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/lubuntu/releases/14.04/beta-2/

More information on Lubuntu Final Beta can be found here: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/TrustyTahr/ReleaseNotes/Beta2/Lubuntu

Ubuntu GNOME

Ubuntu GNOME is a flavor of Ubuntu featuring the GNOME desktop environment.

The Final Beta images can be downloaded at: http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/ubuntu-gnome/releases/14.04/beta-2/

More information on Ubuntu GNOME Final Beta can be found here: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/TrustyTahr/Beta2/UbuntuGNOME

UbuntuKylin

UbuntuKylin is a flavor of Ubuntu that is more suitable for Chinese users.

The Final Beta images can be downloaded at: http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/ubuntukylin/releases/14.04/beta-2/

More information on UbuntuKylin Final Beta can be found here: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/UbuntuKylin/1404-beta-2-ReleaseNote

Ubuntu Studio

Ubuntu Studio is a flavor of Ubuntu that provides a full range of multimedia content creation applications for each key workflows: audio, graphics, video, photography and publishing.

The Final Beta images can be downloaded at: http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/ubuntustudio/releases/14.04/beta-2/

More information on Ubuntu Studio Final Beta can be found here: http://ubuntustudio.org/2014/03/ubuntu-studio-beta-2-is-out/

Xubuntu

Xubuntu is a flavor of Ubuntu that comes with Xfce, which is a stable, light and configurable desktop environment.

The Final Beta images can be downloaded at: http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/xubuntu/releases/14.04/beta-2/

More information on Xubuntu Final Beta can be found here: https://wiki.ubuntu.com/TrustyTahr/ReleaseNotes/Beta2/Xubuntu

Regular daily images for Ubuntu can be found at: http://cdimage.ubuntu.com

Ubuntu is a full-featured Linux distribution for clients, servers and clouds, with a fast and easy installation and regular releases. A tightly-integrated selection of excellent applications is included, and an incredible variety of add-on software is just a few clicks away.

Professional technical support is available from Canonical Limited and hundreds of other companies around the world. For more information about support, visit http://www.ubuntu.com/support

If you would like to help shape Ubuntu, take a look at the list of ways you can participate at: http://www.ubuntu.com/community/participate

Your comments, bug reports, patches and suggestions really help us to improve this and future releases of Ubuntu. Instructions can be found at: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/ReportingBugs

You can find out more about Ubuntu and about this beta release on our website, IRC channel and wiki.

To sign up for future Ubuntu announcements, please subscribe to Ubuntu’s very low volume announcement list at:

http://lists.ubuntu.com/mailman/listinfo/ubuntu-announce

On behalf of the entire Ubuntu Release Team,
Adam Conrad

Originally posted to the ubuntu-announce mailing list on Thu Mar 27 23:33:48 UTC 2014 by Adam Conrad

Xubuntu: Xubuntu 14.04 Final Beta

Thu, 2014-03-27 23:56

The Xubuntu team is pleased to announce the immediate release of Xubuntu 14.04 Beta 2. This is the last beta towards the final LTS release.

If this is the first time you’ve looked at a Beta this cycle then much has changed. Please see the notes from Beta 1 for more details on those.

The Beta 2 release is available for download by torrents and direct downloads from
http://cdimage.ubuntu.com/xubuntu/releases/trusty/beta-2/

Release notes can be found here.

Thanks to the 11 who tested the images and reported results for us

  • lyz
  • paulw2u
  • knome
  • elfy
  • texadactyl
  • scottbomb
  • irihapeti
  • slickymaster
  • toz
  • wkrekik
  • jibel
Known issues

Some of the known issues include:

  • Thunar doesn’t automatically mount removable devices and media (1210898)
  • Network shares aren’t shown on the desktop (1284914)
  • Wallpaper selection dialogue empty (1271713)
  • Wallpaper once installed is XFCE (1297170 )
  • Installed keyboard layout changes after boot (1284635 , 1231520 )

Thanks to everybody contributing to Xubuntu! As always, new contributors are always welcome to join us. There are various different tasks to do, from testing daily ISOs and new package versions to writing and translating documentation to fixing bugs. To learn more about contributing, read the Get Involved section on the Xubuntu website.

Kubuntu: Kubuntu 14.04 LTS Beta 2

Thu, 2014-03-27 23:46
Trusty Beta 2, now based on KDE SC 4.13 beta, is available for testing. Go straight to the download page or read up on what's new in the release announcement.

Lubuntu Blog: Trusty Tahr β2

Thu, 2014-03-27 21:05
Almost there! A new beta has been released at the mirrors, Lubuntu 14.04 Trusty Tahr beta 2. You already know all the stuff: a few improvements, updated packages, lots of fixes, etc. Look, we were busy: pcmanfm 1.2.0 (folder settings, dual pane view, menu editing) artwork (new icons, theme update, more compatibilities) new interface for lxsession-default-apps firefox fixings But still beta,

Luis de Bethencourt: snappy has arrived to 1.0

Thu, 2014-03-27 20:02
snappy is an open source media player that gathers the power and flexibility of GStreamer inside the comfort of a minimalistic Clutter interface.

The snappy development team is proud to announce it's 1.0 release.
Codename: "I'll be back", Terminator

We think the project has achieved the maturity worthy of a 1.0 release. It does one thing and it does it well.



Some of the changes you will notice are:
  • It’s been given some needed visual polish
  • Playback speed adjustable
  • Video and audio synchronization tweeking
  • Time left of stream viewer
  • Better drag and drop
  • Better media history handling
  • More features accessible from Clutter interface
  • Bug fixes


Features already included from previous releases:
  • Subtitle support
  • Desktop launcher
  • Video and audio synchronization tweeking.
  • Multi-screen full-screen
  • Media queues
  • History of played media
  • Seeking/muting/cycling through languages (audio streams)
  • Frame stepping
  • Much more


Download a tarball: xz
Clone the git repo
Packages in distributions will be updated soon

Thanks to all who helped in snappy's creation!


Disclaimer: No moose were harmed during the making of this release. One got homesick and an other disappeared for days in a Breaking Bad marathon, but that's about it.

Ubuntu GNOME: Ubuntu GNOME Trusty Tahr Final Beta has been released

Thu, 2014-03-27 19:36

Hi,

Ubuntu GNOME Team is happy to announce the release of Ubuntu GNOME Trusty Tahr Final Beta.

Please see the release notes.

We’re preparing Ubuntu GNOME 14.04 LTS, the Trusty Tahr, for distribution in 17th of April 2014. With this Beta 2 release, you can see what we are trying out in preparation for our next stable version. We have some interesting things happening, so read on for highlights and information.

NOTE:
This is a Beta 2 Release. Ubuntu GNOME Beta Releases are NOT recommended for:

  • Regular users who are not aware of pre-release issues
  • Anyone who needs a stable system
  • Anyone uncomfortable running a possibly frequently broken system
  • Anyone in a production environment with data or workflows that need to be reliable

Ubuntu GNOME Beta Releases are recommended for:

  • Regular users who want to help us test by finding, reporting, and/or fixing bugs
  • Ubuntu GNOME developers

To help with testing Ubuntu GNOME:
Please see Testing Ubuntu GNOME Wiki Page.

To contact Ubuntu GNOME:
Please see our full list of contact channels.

Thank you for choosing and testing Ubuntu GNOME!

Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: Season 7 is coming!

Thu, 2014-03-27 17:35

Just a quick note to say we’re coming back with a brand new season of the Ubuntu Podcast, Live on Wednesday 2nd April 2014. Listen to this episode to hear all about it!

 Download OGG  Download MP3 Play in Popup

Please send your comments and suggestions to: podcast@ubuntu-uk.org
Join us on IRC in #uupc on Freenode
Leave a voicemail via phone: +44 (0) 203 298 1600, sip: podcast@sip.ubuntu-uk.org and skype: ubuntuukpodcast
Follow our twitter feed http://twitter.com/uupc
Find our Facebook Fan Page
Follow us on Google Plus

Canonical Design Team: Latest from the web team — March 2014

Thu, 2014-03-27 15:16

Spring has officially (but not technically…) arrived, and we’re getting busier and busier in preparation for Ubuntu 14.04 LTS release next month.

In the last few weeks we’ve worked on:

  • Ubuntu Resources: we’ve just launched a new version of the site
  • Ubuntu.com: we’ve launched a localised Chinese homepage that highlights Ubuntu Kylin
  • Juju GUI: Matthieu has worked on a new icon set for charms which will be released in the next few weeks
  • Fenchurch: we completely rewrote the Juju charm that updates canonical.com
  • Landscape sprint: Carla has been to Rome for the Landscape team’s sprint, where she helped to wireframe changes for 14.04 and beyond

And we’re currently working on:

  • Ubuntu Resources: we’re now working on expanding the styles of the site to accommodate desktop screen sizes and adding even more features
  • Ubuntu 14.04 release: we’re reskinning the OpenStack Horizon dashboard for the OpenStack 14.04 release, and we’ve started working on updated images for the release
  • Responsive ubuntu.com: we’ve been testing on various devices and fixing lots of little rendering issues; we’ve also been tackling larger challenges like the navigation and footer; you can follow our progress in the series of posts we’re publishing on this blog!
  • Fenchurch: we’re currently updating the contributions and download pages so that it works on Fenchurch
  • Juju: we’re doing some user research to understand engineer workflows
  • Cloud section: we’ve finished wireframing and the first round of designs for the 14.04 refresh of www.ubuntu.com’s cloud section
  • Partners section of ubuntu.com: we’re at the wireframing stage of this project

This month we’ve also welcomed a new member of the team: Robin is our new back-end developer.

Testing Ubuntu Resources on a Kindle Fire HD

Have you got any questions or suggestions for us? Would you like to hear about any of these projects and tasks in more detail? Let us know your thoughts in the comments.

Sam Hewitt: Fish Tacos

Thu, 2014-03-27 15:00
Who doesn't love a fish taco?

I don't have a fancy name for these, they're just something I put together, but they were tasty, so here you go.

I'm using "~" in a lot of places here because they are my best guess to what I actually use as I eyeball things nearly always.

Cooking involves chemistry but it need not be exact, for me, that's part of the fun of cooking. You can play around with recipes, which is something few people do; a recipe is not set-in-stone, have fun and change things!

    Fish Ingredients
  • ~1 kg white fish fillet, such as cod, tilapia, etc.
  • ~1 cup all-p flour
  • salt & pepper
  • ~3 tablespoons butter
    Garlic-Chili-Lime Aioli Ingredients
  • ~1/4 cup mayonaisse
  • ~1/4 cup sour cream
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • ~1 tablespoon hot sauce (such as sriracha)
  • 1 lime, juice of
  • freshly ground black pepper
    Assembly Ingredients
  • flour tortillas
  • green cabbage, shredded
  • fresh cilantro, chopped
  • garlic-chili-lime aioli
  • guacamole
    Aioli Directions
  1. Place everything in a blender and blend.
  2. Transfer to a container or (food-safe squeeze bottle –I have a bunch myself).
  3. Refrigerate.
    Fish Directions
  1. Preheat a frying pan over medium-high heat.
  2. Salt and pepper both sides of the fish fillet.
  3. Dredge the fillet(s) in flour
  4. Melt the butter in the pan. When it begins to sizzle place the fillets in the pan.
  5. Let it brown on that initial side (perhaps ~4 minutes) & resist the urge to move it.
  6. Flip, brown the other side.
  7. Remove from the heat an set aside.
    Assembly
  1. On a tortilla, squirt/smear on some of the aioli.
  2. Place some of the shredded cabbage atop that, and next some of the pan-fried fish.
  3. Garnish with the chopped cilantro, and guacamole, and a squeeze of lime if you like.
  4. Enjoy. :-)

Canonical Design Team: Ubuntu Resources — beta 2!

Thu, 2014-03-27 09:16

A new version of the Ubuntu Resources site is now live, with many tweaks and layout improvements targeted mainly at visitors using medium-sized screens, such as tablets.

Ubuntu Resources homepage viewed on a Kindle Fire HD

Filtered search

If you search for a specific term, you can now filter the search results by topic (such as cloud, phone, support, etc.) or type (case study, white paper, event, etc.). Further down the line, we’d like to expand this so people are able to sort the results by date, popularity and more, and filter by date, language and other options.

Search results filters

Still on the subject of search, some users mentioned that their phones didn’t necessarily show a “Go” button in the keypad when typing inside the search box, so we’ve added a search icon which doubles as a “Go” button inside the input field but doesn’t get in the way if you have no need for it.

Search input field, viewed on a Nexus 7

Layout and font sizes

We’ve added a maximum width to text areas instead of the full width text blocks that were optimised for small screen view, so visitors to the site using tablets and other medium sized screens won’t have to deal with really long text lines. This can be seen in screens such as the homepage and topic landing pages, but most importantly in single article views, where we’ve also moved the content that followed the article text to the right hand side. In future versions of the site, we might review the order in which these right column elements appear and perhaps their content too.

A news page with sidebar viewed on an iPad

Following the typographic scale that we introduced in the new canonical.com website, the font sizes and spacing between elements in medium sized views have also been updated: everything is slightly larger, as there is more screen real estate and elements can have a little more breathing space.

We’ve made some tweaks to the spacing between elements, namely in the homepage and landing pages, like adding more space between articles to make lists clearer to understand.

‘Add to’

We’ve also added links to “Add to Instapaper” and “Add to Pocket” in single article view screens, which we hope will be useful for anyone that wants to save a resource for later.

Colour consistency

A hardly noticeable change, but one that we thought was important in order to keep consistency across different Ubuntu products and platforms was the update of the grey colour we were using in tags, labels and event details. The new grey now matches the new phone greys: we went from #AEA79F to a slightly darker and more readable #888888. If warm grey is used on dark aubergine, the HEX reference is now #B2B2B2.

Darker grey in event details

Even more changes

We’ve also fixed many other bugs and issues like 404 pages, incorrect tagging, elements’ positioning, incorrect title tags, errors in the email sharing default text, and more.

Next steps

In the next few weeks we’ll be focusing on extending our styles to accommodate larger screens nicely and improving the medium screen size layouts based on the feedback we’ll receive from users.

We hope you have a look at the updated site and let us know your thoughts on it. You can use the handy feedback link at the bottom of the site or just comment here!

Pages