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Adolfo Jayme Barrientos: Let’s fight for document freedom together!

Thu, 2014-04-03 13:21


Since its inception, the LibreOffice project has been pursuing the objective of freeing office computing from vendor lock-in. Now, some fellow Document Foundation members and LibreOffice developers have announced an umbrella project for all the file parsing libraries that are being developed to achieve this objective.

The new project is called Document Liberation, and will house the wide range of libraries that are already allowing LibreOffice users to have control on their own files. We want everyone to, for example, take their old files written in proprietary formats and have a way to recover the information, convert it over to a standard-compliant, modern format, and ensure the long-term preservation of the information they own – because you should own your data, not a specific version of a program.

Are you interested on this? Let’s make it happen! Head over the new Document Liberation website and read all about this effort.

Gerfried Fuchs: 2CELLOS

Thu, 2014-04-03 10:08

A good friend just yesterday sent me a link to a one and a half hour lasting live concert of 2CELLOS. And wow, I was deeply impressed. Terrific! Even Sir Elton John approves. Have to share them with you, too. :)

Enjoy!

P.S.: I sooo love them also for their pun in their second album title, In2ition. :D

/music | permanent link | Comments: 0 |

Ubuntu GNOME: Canonical is Shutting Down Ubuntu One File Services

Thu, 2014-04-03 09:35

Hi,

“No, unfortunately it’s not an April Fools joke.”

Said Jane Silber from Canonical.

Sad but true. Canonical is shutting down Ubuntu One file services.

“Today we are announcing plans to shut down the Ubuntu One file services. This is a tough decision, particularly when our users rely so heavily on the functionality that Ubuntu One provides. However, like any company, we want to focus our efforts on our most important strategic initiatives and ensure we are not spread too thin.”

However, the shutting down will not be over night but Ubuntu One will no longer be available on Ubuntu and its official variants.

“As of today, it will no longer be possible to purchase storage or music from the Ubuntu One store. The Ubuntu One file services will not be included in the upcoming Ubuntu 14.04 LTS release, and the Ubuntu One apps in older versions of Ubuntu and in the Ubuntu, Google, and Apple stores will be updated appropriately. The current services will be unavailable from 1 June 2014; user content will remain available for download until 31 July, at which time it will be deleted.”

This decision, as per Canonical, will not affect:

“The shutdown will not affect the Ubuntu One single sign on service, the Ubuntu One payment service, or the backend U1DB database service.”

For Full Details, please refer to this post.

Thank you!

Jono Bacon: Ubuntu Online Summit Dates

Wed, 2014-04-02 23:03

At the last Ubuntu Developer Summit we discussed the idea of making our regular online summit serve more than just developers. We are interested in showcasing not just the developer-orientated discussion sessions that we currently have, but also including content such as presentations, demos, tutorials, and other topics.

I just wanted to give everyone a heads up that the first Ubuntu Online Summit will happen from 10th – 12th June 2014. The website is not yet updated (we are going to keep everything on summit.ubuntu.com and uds.ubuntu.com can point there, and Michael is making the changes to bring over the static content).

We are really keen to get ideas for how the event can run so I am scheduling a hangout on Thurs 10th April at 5pm UTC on Ubuntu On Air where I would welcome ideas and input. I hope to see you there!

Lubuntu Blog: Ubuntu One shutting down

Wed, 2014-04-02 21:21
Ubuntu One is about to close. Canonical can't continue offering this service anymore. This is really annoying to all of us, who trusted in their (excellent, by the way) service, the high transfer ratio and the space. But for this blog this can be awful, because all the links in this site are pointing to files hosted in this service, and now I have to migrate all of them. I'd like to apologize

Ubuntu Kernel Team: Kernel Team Meeting Minutes – April 01, 2014

Wed, 2014-04-02 20:15
Meeting Minutes

IRC Log of the meeting.

Meeting minutes.

Agenda

20140402 Meeting Agenda


ARM Status

Nothing new to report this week


Release Metrics and Incoming Bugs

Release metrics and incoming bug data can be reviewed at the following link:

http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/reports/kt-meeting.txt


Milestone Targeted Work Items    apw    core-1311-kernel    4 work items          core-1311-cross-compilation    2 work items          core-1311-hwe-plans    1 work item       ogasawara    core-1311-kernel    1 work item          core-1403-hwe-stack-eol-notifications    2 work items       smb    servercloud-1311-openstack-virt    3 work items   


Status: Trusty Development Kernel

The 3.13.0-21.43 Trusty kernel has been uploaded to the archive. With
kernel freeze about to go into effect this Thurs Apr 3, I do not
anticipate another upload between now and then. After kernel freeze,
all patches are subject to our Ubuntu SRU policy and only critical bug
fixes will warrant an upload before release.
—–
Important upcoming dates:
Thurs Apr 03 – Kernel Freeze (~2 days away)
Thurs Apr 17 – Ubuntu 14.04 Final Release (~2 weeks away)


Status: CVE’s

The current CVE status can be reviewed at the following link:

http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/cve/pkg/ALL-linux.html


Status: Stable, Security, and Bugfix Kernel Updates -

Saucy/Raring/Quantal/Precise/Lucid (bjf/henrix/kamal)
Status for the main kernels, until today (Mar. 25):

  • Lucid – Prep week
  • Precise – Prep week
  • Quantal – Prep week
  • Saucy – Prep week

    Current opened tracking bugs details:

  • http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/reports/kernel-sru-workflow.html

    For SRUs, SRU report is a good source of information:

  • http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/reports/sru-report.html

    Schedule:

    cycle: 30-Mar through 26-Apr
    ====================================================================
    28-Mar Last day for kernel commits for this cycle
    30-Mar – 05-Apr Kernel prep week.
    06-Apr – 12-Apr Bug verification & Regression testing.
    17-Apr 14.04 Released
    13-Apr – 26-Apr Regression testing & Release to -updates.


Open Discussion or Questions? Raise your hand to be recognized

No open discussions.

Duncan McGreggor: Hash Maps in LFE: Request for Comment

Wed, 2014-04-02 17:33
As you may have heard, hash maps are coming to Erlang in R17. We're all pretty excited about this. The LFE community (yes, we have one... hey, being headquartered on Gutland keeps us lean!) has been abuzz with excitement: do we get some new syntax for Erlang maps? Or just record-like macros?

That's still an open question. There's a good chance that if we find an elegant solution, we'll get some new syntax.

In an effort to (re)start this conversation and get us thinking about the possibilities, I've drawn together some examples from various Lisps. At the end of the post, we'll review some related data structures in LFE... as a point of contrast and possible guidance.

Note that I've tried to keep the code grouped in larger gists, not split up with prose wedged between them. This should make it easier to compare and contrast whole examples at a glance.

Before we dive into the Lisps, let's take a look at maps in Erlang:

Erlang Maps

Common Lisp Hash Tables

Racket Hash Tables

Clojure Hash Maps

Shen Property Lists

OpenLisp Hash Tables

LFE Property Lists

LFE orddicts

I summarized some very basic usability and aesthetic thoughts on the LFE mail list, but I'll restate them here:
  • Erlang syntax really is quite powerful; I continue to be impressed.
  • Clojure was by far the most enjoyable to work with... however, doing something similar in LFE would require quite a bit of additions for language or macro infrastructure. My concern here is that we'd end up with a Clojure clone rather than something distinctly Erlang-Lispy.
  • Racket had the fullest and most useful set of hash functions (and best docs).
  • Chicken Scheme was probably second.
  • Common Lisp was probably (I hate to say it) the most awkward of the bunch). I'm hoping we can avoid pretty much everything the way it was done there :-/
One of the things that makes Clojure such a joy to work with is the unified aspect of core functions and how one uses these to manipulate data structures of different types. Most other implementations have functions/macros that are dedicated to working with just maps. While that's clean and definitely has a strong appeal, Clojure reflects a great deal of elegance.

That being said, I don't think today is the day to propose unifying features for LFE/Erlang data types ;-) (To be honest, though, it's certainly in the back of my mind... this is probably also true for many folks on the mail list.)

Given my positive experience with maps (hash tables) in Racket, and Robert's initial proposed functions like map-new, map-set, I'd encourage us to look to Racket for some inspiration:
Additional thoughts:
  • "map" has a specific meaning in FPs (: lists map), and there's a little bit of cognitive dissonance for me when I look at map-*
  • In my experience, applications generally don't have too many records; however, I've known apps with 100s and 1000s of instances of hash maps; as such, the idea of creating macros for each hash-map (e.g., my-map-get, my-map-set, ...) terrifies me a little. I don't believe this has been proposed, and I don't know enough about LFE's internals (much less, Erlang's) to be able to discuss this with any certainty.
  • The thought did occur that we could put all the map functions in a module e.g., (: maps new ... ), etc. I haven't actually looked at the Erlang source and don't know how maps are implemented in R17 yet (nor how that functionality is presented to the developer). Obviously, once I have, this point will be more clear for me.
With this done, I then did a thought experiment in potential syntax additions for LFE. Below are the series of gists that demonstrate this.

Looking at this Erlang syntax:

My fingers want to do something like this in LFE:

That feels pretty natural, from the LFE perspective. However, it looks like it might require hacking on the tuple-parsing logic (or splitting that into two code paths: one for regular tuple-parsing, and the other for maps...?).

The above syntax also lends itself nicely to these:

The question that arises for me is "how would we do this when calling functions?" Perhaps one of these:

Then, for Joe's other example:

We'd have this for LFE:

Before we pattern match on this, let's look at Erlang pattern matching for tuples:

Compare this with pattern matching elements of a tuple in LFE:

With that in our minds, we turn to Joe's matching example against a specific map element:

And we could do the same in LFE like this:

I'm really uncertain about add-pair and update-pair, both the need for them and the names. Interested to hear from others who know how map is implemented in Erlang and the best way to work with that in LFE...

Daniel Holbach: Got any plans for the weekend?

Wed, 2014-04-02 13:26

This weekend (4-6 April) the Ubuntu community is celebrating another Ubuntu Global Jam! The goal, as always, is to get together as a team and make Ubuntu better, get people involved and have fun. In the past we all focused on packaging, fixing bugs, translations, documentation and testing. The most recent addition to the mix are App Dev School events.

The goal of App Dev Schools is to have a look at developing apps for Ubuntu together. We made this a lot easier by providing presentation material and virtualbox images and instructions for how to run an event. If you have a bit of programming experience, it should be easy for you to run the sessions with just a bit of preparation time.

Why is this exciting and probably a good idea to discuss in the team? Simple: it has never been easier to write apps for Ubuntu and publish them. You can choose between Qt/QML apps and HTML5 apps – both are easy to put together and packaging/publishing an app is a matter of a couple of a clicks. Awesome!

Check out the Ubuntu Global Jam page and find out how have your own local event. If it’s just you and a couple of friends meeting up – don’t worry – it’s still a jam!

Have a great weekend everyone!

Lubuntu Blog: Box theme 0.45

Wed, 2014-04-02 11:26
Only two for the forthcoming Trusty Tahr release, and as I promised, I uploaded Box 0.45 with full support for dark panels, including icons for both panels, themes for dark and light panels, and a smaller version of the Openbox theme. Changes in this package: added dark panel gtk theme added matching white panel icons small and big versions of window controls complete set of stock and gnome

Canonical Design Team: Making ubuntu.com responsive: lessons learned (5)

Wed, 2014-04-02 09:11

This post is part of the series ‘Making ubuntu.com responsive‘.

At this point in time, once the pilot projects were either completed or underway, we had already:

We had a better understanding of what was involved in working on this type of project, with different constraints and work flows. With lots of ideas and questions floating in our minds, we decided that the best next step was for designers and front-end developers to spend two or three days right after the release of the new canonical.com website to discuss and capture the findings.

It’s important to take time to take in the pros and cons of certain approaches we try as a team, so that we can try to avoid repeating past mistakes and keep doing more of the things that make projects run smoothly and produce great results.

Developers sprinting and a wall of sticky notes

Things we learned Make sure you have a solid grid

Our new responsive grid seemed to adapt well from large to small screens (I will be publishing a post on this later in the series, so stay tuned!) and this was mostly because when we initially created the CSS and HTML we opted for using percentage and relative units rather than absolute units (like pixels).

Use Modernizr for feature detection

The introduction of Modernizr to our developer tools proved essential to easily detect features across browsers, such as SVG support, and provide adequate fallbacks and is something we’ll keep using in the future.

SVG icons and pictograms

We started the move from bitmap-based images to SVG for things like pictograms and UI elements. This was easy from a design perspective, as all of our icons and pictograms are already created as SVGs (as well as other formats). There were some hiccups when we tested the PNG fallback solution in some operating systems and browsers, like Opera Mini. But more on this in an upcoming post dedicated to images!

Things we had to work on Defining visual layout across screen sizes

We were used to creating large, desktop-focused visuals and we had the tools to do so quickly — our style guide. Because the deadlines were looming, we decided we wouldn’t create lots of different mockups for each page in canonical.com and instead create flat mockups for large screen and work alongside the developers on how that would scale and flow in small and medium sized screens.

The wireframes were kept as linear as possible — they were more of a content and hierarchy overview to guide the visual designers — , and the content was produced so that it wasn’t too long for small screens.

A wireframe created for canonical.com

The problem with this approach was that, even though we all agreed with the general ways in which the content and visual elements would reflow from small to large screens, by creating comps for the large screen problems invariably arose and reflows that sounded great in our own minds didn’t really work as easily or smoothly as we thought.

It’s important that you define how you’re going to tackle this issue: in this case, canonical.com was designed from scratch, so it was more difficult to visualise how a large design could adapt to a small screen across the team. In the case of ubuntu.com, though, the tight scope means we’re adapting existing designs, so it makes sense to work almost exclusively in the browser and test it at the same time.

Initial small screen canonical.com prototypes: ‘needs work’

In the future, when we need to produce mockups we will make sure they are created initially for smaller screens and then for larger screens. When mockups aren’t necessary — for example, if we’re creating pages based on existing patterns — we are already building directly in code, for small screens first, and enhancements are added as the available screen space gets bigger.

Animations

Even though the addition of CSS animations to our repertoire made for more interesting pages, making sure that they are designed to work well and look good across different screen sizes proved harder than expected.

In the future, we’ll need to carefully think about how having (or not having) an animation impacts small screens, how the animation should work from small to large screens, and what the fallback(s) should be, instead of assuming that the developers can simply rescale them.

The process going forward

As a final note, it’s important to mention that in a fast-paced project, where decisions need to be made quickly and several people are involved in the project, you should keep a register of those decisions in a central location, where everyone can access them. This could be anything from a solution for a bug to even the decision of not fixing an issue, along with the reasoning behind it.

Zygmunt Krynicki: PlainBox Target Device

Wed, 2014-04-02 08:43

The plainbox-0.6 milestone is full of content but one thing I want to point out is the CEP-4 blueprint. In short, you will be able to run PlainBox on a desktop or laptop computer but execute tests on a server or tablet device you can connect to over ssh or adb.

I'd like to solicit comments and feedback on the proposed design. Development has started but so far just in R&D mode, to check the limitations of adb and see how the proposed design really fits into the current architecture.

So, if you are interested in device or server testing, have a look at the specification (linked from the blueprint) and discuss this in checkbox-dev@lists.launchpad.net. Please help us help you better.

Tony Whitmore: Ubuntu Podcast – Season 7 starts tomorrow!

Tue, 2014-04-01 19:18

Tomorrow evening we’ll be bringing a brand new season of the Ubuntu Podcast to your ears. After an extended winter break, we’re ready to dust off our microphones and mixers, fire up our laptops and dive head first into the new season. We’ll be streaming the show live at 2030 BST so you can listen and even participate through the IRC channel. Visit the live page on the website to find out more.

As we did last year, we will be releasing new episodes for download every week. If you can’t wait for that, listen live on alternate Wednesday evenings for about an hour. You can check the recording dates on our website or add them to your Google calendar.

The show will be much as you know and hopefully love it: A mix of discussion, interviews, news, silliness and cake. It would be great if you could join us at 2030 BST tomorrow (Wednesday 2nd April) for the first live show of the season!

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