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Ubuntu Server blog: OpenStack Continuous Integration on Ubuntu 101

Thu, 2014-04-10 00:39

We (the Canonical OIL dev team) are about to finish the production roll out of our OpenStack Interoperability Lab (OIL). It’s been an awesome time getting here so I thought I would take the opportunity to get everyone familiar, at a high level, with what OIL is and some of the cool technology behind it.

So what is OIL?

For starters, OIL is essentially continuous integration of the entire stack, from hardware preparation, to Operating System deployment, to orchestration of OpenStack and third party software, all while running specific tests at each point in the process. All test results and CI artifacts are centrally stored for analysis and monthly report generation.

Typically, setting up a cloud (particularly OpenStack) for the first time can be frustrating and time consuming. The potential combinations and permutations of hardware/software components and configurations can quickly become mind-numbing. To help ease the process and provide stability across options we sought to develop an interoperability test lab to vet as much of the ecosystem as possible.

To accomplish this we developed a CI process for building and tearing down entire OpenStack deployments in order to validate every step in the process and to make sure it is repeatable. The OIL lab is comprised of a pool of machines (including routers/switches, storage systems, and computer servers) from a large number of partners. We continually pull available nodes from the pool, setup the entire stack, go to town testing, and then tear it all back down again. We do this so many times that we are already deploying around 50 clouds a day and expect to scale this by a factor of 3-4 with our production roll-out. Generally, each cloud is composed of about 5-7 machines each but we have the ability to scale each test as well.

But that’s not all, in addition to testing we also do bug triage, defect analysis and work both internally and with our partners on fixing as many things as we can. All to ensure that deploying OpenStack on Ubuntu is as seamless a process as possible for both users and vendors alike.

Underlying Technology

We didn’t want to reinvent the wheel so, we are leveraging the latest Ubuntu technologies as well as some standard tools to do all of this. In fact the majority of the OIL infrastructure is public code you can get and start playing with right away!

Here is a small list of what we are using for all this CI goodness:

  • MaaS — to do the base OS install
  • Juju — for all the complicated OpenStack setup steps — and linking them together
  • Tempest — the standard test suite that pokes and prods OpenStack to ensure everything is working
  • Machine selections & random config generation code — to make sure we get a good hardware/software cross sections
  • Jenkins — gluing everything together

Using all of this we are able to manage our hardware effectively, and with a similar setup you can easily too. This is just a high-level overview so we will have to leave the in-depth technological discussions for another time.

More to come

We plan on having a few more blog posts cover some of the more interesting aspects (both results we are getting from OIL and some underlying technological discussions).

We are getting very close to OIL’s official debut and are excited to start publishing some really insightful data.

Ben Howard: Updated 12.04.4 LTS Cloud Images in response to Heartbleed OpenSSL bug

Wed, 2014-04-09 20:04
Many of our Cloud Image users have inquired about the availability of updated Ubuntu Cloud Images in response to the Heartbleed OpenSSL Vulnerability [1]. Ubuntu released update Ubuntu packages for OpenSSL yesterday, 08 April 2014 [2]. Due to the exceptional circumstances and severity of the Heartbleed OpenSSL bug, Canonical has released new 12.04.4 LTS images at [3]. In the coming days, new Cloud Images for Ubuntu 12.10 and Ubuntu 13.10 will be released.

Canonical is working with Amazon to get the Quickstart and the AWS Marketplace links updated. In the meantime, you can find new AMI ID's for 12.04.4 LTS at [3] and [4]. Also, the snapshot's for Amazon have the volume-create permission granted on the latest images.

Windows Azure [5], Joyent [6] and HP [7, 8, 9] all have updated 12.04.4 LTS images in their respective galleries.

If you are running an affected version of OpenSSL on 12.04 LTS, 12.10 or 13.10, you are strongly encouraged to update. For new instances, it is recommended to either use an image with a serial newer than 20140408, or update your OpenSSL  package immediately upon launch. Finally, if you need documentation on enabling unattended upgrades, please see [10].


[1] https://www.openssl.org/news/secadv_20140407.txt
[2] http://www.ubuntu.com/usn/usn-2165-1/
[3] http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/releases/precise/release-20140408/
[4] http://cloud-images.ubuntu.com/locator/ec2/
[5] Azure: Ubuntu-12_04_4-LTS-amd64-server-20140408-en-us-30GB
[6] Joyent Image "ubuntu-certified-12.04", fe5aa6c0-0f09-4b1f-9bad-83e453bb74f3
[7] HP US-West-1: 27be722e-d2d0-44f0-bebe-471c4af76039
[8] HP US-East-1: 8672f4c6-e33d-46f5-b6d8-ebbeba12fa02
[9] Waiting on HP for replication to legacy regions az-{1,2,3}
[10] https://help.ubuntu.com/community/AutomaticSecurityUpdates

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